Valerie Hopkins


Valerie Hopkins is a journalist based in the Western Balkans. Follow her on Twitter @Valeriein140.
Articles by Valerie Hopkins
A man walks past a mural, vandalized with paint, depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and US President Donald Trump and bearing the Cyrillic letters reading "Kosovo is Serbia", in Belgrade on January 25, 2017.   / AFP / ANDREJ ISAKOVIC / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION        (Photo credit should read ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks past a mural, vandalized with paint, depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and US President Donald Trump and bearing the Cyrillic letters reading "Kosovo is Serbia", in Belgrade on January 25, 2017. / AFP / ANDREJ ISAKOVIC / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images)
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MOSTAR, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - JUNE 28:  A cat walks near the Old Bridge in front of a sign "Don't Forget" as the city of Mostar remembers the 1993 conflict on June 28, 2013 in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Siege of Mostar peaked in 1993 during the Croat-Bosniak conflict lasting eighteen months as fighting took place as Bosnia and Herzegovina declared independence from Yugoslavia. The city was divided in half between the two battling armies. Mostar, dating back over four hundred years, was mostly destroyed through the fighting. Although reconstruction has slowly commenced in the last decades, evidence of the war remains in bullet ravaged buildings still standing throughout the city.   (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images)
MOSTAR, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - JUNE 28: A cat walks near the Old Bridge in front of a sign "Don't Forget" as the city of Mostar remembers the 1993 conflict on June 28, 2013 in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Siege of Mostar peaked in 1993 during the Croat-Bosniak conflict lasting eighteen months as fighting took place as Bosnia and Herzegovina declared independence from Yugoslavia. The city was divided in half between the two battling armies. Mostar, dating back over four hundred years, was mostly destroyed through the fighting. Although reconstruction has slowly commenced in the last decades, evidence of the war remains in bullet ravaged buildings still standing throughout the city. (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images)
TOVARNIK, CROATIA - SEPTEMBER 23:  Migrants stand in line at Tovarnik station as they wait to board a train heading to Zagred as more migrants arrive from the Serbian border on September 23, 2015 in Tovarnik, Croatia. Croatia has built a refugee camp to control the transit of migrants to Hungary with a capacity of 4,000 people. EU leaders attended an extraordinary summit today in Brussels in an attempt to resolve the ongoing crisis. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
TOVARNIK, CROATIA - SEPTEMBER 23: Migrants stand in line at Tovarnik station as they wait to board a train heading to Zagred as more migrants arrive from the Serbian border on September 23, 2015 in Tovarnik, Croatia. Croatia has built a refugee camp to control the transit of migrants to Hungary with a capacity of 4,000 people. EU leaders attended an extraordinary summit today in Brussels in an attempt to resolve the ongoing crisis. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
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