Argument

An Indonesian health official monitors as passengers from an international flight have their temperature checked as they pass a thermal scanner monitor upon arrival at the Adisucipto International Airport on January 23, 2020 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Virus Travel Bans Are Inevitable But Ineffective

Experts can't stop restrictions, but they can mitigate them.

In this photo taken on February 6, 2020, a woman helps her daughter seen wearing a face mask in Pyongyang.

North Korea Isn’t Ready for Coronavirus Devastation

The country has sealed its borders — but an outbreak would be a chance for the United States to do good.

US ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell attends a new year's reception of the German President on January 14, 2019 in Berlin.

The Death of Truth to Power

Intelligence services do their job by staying out of politics. Donald Trump’s new intelligence chief could end all that.

ASEAN foreign ministers shake hands on stage at a summit about the coronavirus called by China in Vientiane, Laos, on Feb. 20.

Hun Sen Is More Worried About Beijing Than the Coronavirus

Cambodia’s autocrat is putting his own people at risk to court his Chinese backers.

Soldiers lift a coffin into a van during the dignified transfer of two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan

Why Afghanistan Is America’s Greatest Strategic Disaster

Pompeo's plan to make peace with the resurgent Taliban is a sad reminder of all that went wrong in Afghanistan—and how it could have been otherwise.

Demonstrators hold placards and wave Indian flags.

India’s Economic Troubles Are Rooted in Politics

Economic models often fail to account for hidden assumptions. Ignoring the importance of trust and belonging in society may be hurting New Delhi more than policymakers understand.

Sky Pizza in Seoul

‘Parasite’ Has a Hidden Backstory of Middle-Class Failure and Chicken Joints

In a few words, Bong Joon-ho conjured up a whole tale of economic insecurity.

A demonstrator against India's new citizenship law

India’s Muslims Are Terrified of Being Deported

Many Indians lack the documents needed to prove citizenship—and Muslims are in the firing line.

Migrant workers from Romania harvest daffodils near Holbeach in eastern England, on Feb. 25, 2019.

Boris Johnson’s New Immigration Rules Will Harm Britain’s Economy

The U.K.’s new points system will keep low-skilled non-English speakers out, pleasing pro-Brexit voters but devastating entire sectors—from agriculture to health care.

Participants check their messages on electronic devices during the World Economic Forum  annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 23.

Will American Firms Put America First?

The Davos-inspired era of unrestrained globalization is over, and companies should start putting the national interests of their home countries ahead of profits.

An Islamic State billboard is seen destroyed in the middle of a road in Qaraqosh, Iraq, on Nov. 8, 2016.

Reintegrating Terrorists

Entrepreneurship can help reintegrate former militants—and may be useful for other types of criminals, too.

Keir Starmer, Rebecca Long-Bailey and Lisa Nandy speaking at a campaign event for Labour Leader and Deputy Leader on February 16, 2020 in London, England.

When Social Justice Activism Becomes an Act of Self-Destruction

An overly strident campaign by Britain’s Labour party to protect transgender people is alienating potential allies across the country.

A student shows a letter from the Indonesian health ministry

Indonesian Screening May Be Missing Virus Carriers

The popular tourist destination has had no coronavirus cases. Is that good luck—or bad testing?

Afghan returnees after arriving from Iran

Iran’s Shifting Afghan Alliances Don’t Fit Easy Narratives

Tehran’s goals are pragmatic—and may be in line with Washington’s.

Anti-government demonstrators rally behind barbed wire.

Lebanon Is Broken. So Are Its Protests.

The country’s protest movement knows what it’s against—but it never figured out how to achieve what it’s for.

New trees planted in Yerevan, Armenia.

Make Armenia Green Again

Can planting 10 million trees shore up the country’s borders and save its environment?

Wallace Mazon holds a sign calling for the abolition of the Iowa caucuses outside the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters in Des Moines on Feb. 4.

If Iowa Were in Africa, International Observers Would Be Crying Foul

The process and results of the Iowa caucuses would be roundly denounced and challenged in the courts in most developing countries. So why are they allowed to stand in the United States?

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas speaks during a meeting with journalists in the Palestinian Authority headquarters in Ramallah on July 3, 2019.

The Oslo Accords Are Dead. Should the Palestinian Authority Live On?

Trump’s peace plan killed any hope of a negotiated settlement. Rather than empty rhetoric, Palestinian leaders owe their people a new approach—even if it means disbanding the PA.

Taiwanese soldiers run through colored smoke during an exercise at a military base in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan, on Jan. 15.

Taiwan’s Military Is a Hollow Shell

The end of conscription has left the army critically undermanned.

Workers at Youan Hospital in Beijing

How to Stop the Next Pandemic Before It Starts

It may be too late to contain the new coronavirus. But we can safeguard the world against the next one.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte

Duterte Terminates U.S. Defense Pact, Pleasing Trump but Few Others

Ending the Visiting Forces Agreement between the Philippines and the United States is a deeply unpopular move.

An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man walks past an electoral billboard bearing a portrait of Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in Jerusalem, on April 1, 2019.

Has the Israeli Right Peaked?

For decades, right-wing parties were on the rise. But as religious voters become more secular and a corruption scandal taints the Likud party, the country’s rightist bloc seems to have hit a ceiling.

A Mongolian woman walks along a road on the outskirts of Ulaanbaatar on July 13, 2016.

Living While Female in Mongolia

The country has some of the worst rates of sexual violence in Asia—and old attitudes are proving hard to change.

An Iranian flag flies in front of the Bushehr nuclear power plant during an official ceremony to kick-start work on a second reactor at the facility on Nov. 10, 2019.

Europe Puts What Remains of the JCPOA in Limbo

By triggering the Iran deal’s dispute resolution mechanism, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom are hoping to push the sides back to the negotiating table—but they may escalate instead.

Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg

No, Pete Buttigieg Is Not a CIA Asset

The agency’s history of bloody-handed bungling abroad has come back to haunt U.S. politics.

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