Argument

Former King Juan Carlos I attends a Mass in occasion of the 25th anniversary of death of his father on April 3, 2018 in El Escorial, Spain.

Is Spain’s Royal Family Finished?

Corruption charges against the former king forced him into exile—and the latest scandal could be the nail in the coffin for the monarchy.

A person wearing a QAnon T-shirt takes part in a rally in Brooklyn, New York, on Aug. 9.

QAnon Destroys Lives. Now It’s Coming for Congress.

It’s hard—but possible—to save people from the conspiracy theory’s grip.

An IBM worker walks inside the company’s 12-inch wafer chip fabricating plant in Fishkill, New York, on July 20, 2004. Mario Tama/Getty Images

In the New Cold War, Deindustrialization Means Disarmament

Chinese security threats offer the chance to rethink the U.S. economy.

U.S. President Donald Trump signs a document reinstating sanctions against Iran after announcing the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal at the White House in Washington on May 8, 2018.

Trump Misses Being Part of the Iran Deal

His administration wants to trigger the JCPOA’s snapback mechanism, but he probably can’t do that from the outside.

Then Vice President Joe Biden talks with Sen. Kamala Harris and her aunt, Sarala Gopalan, during a swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol on Jan. 3, 2016.

The Importance of Kamala Harris’s South Asian Heritage

The media often underplays the fact that Biden’s vice presidential pick has an Indian mother. Her heritage could play a crucial role in U.S. foreign policy.

U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris speaks to reporters after announcing her candidacy for president of the United States at Howard University in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 29, 2019.

Kamala Harris for the People

As vice president, Harris would be ready to go toe-to-toe with adversaries, both foreign and domestic.

The pro-democracy media tycoon and Apple Daily founder Jimmy Lai is escorted by police on Aug. 11, after being arrested in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Police Mix Colonial and Communist Brutality

As Beijing cracks down, it turns to familiar tools of repression.

Russian honor guards march during a military parade at Red Square in Moscow on Nov. 7, 2018.

No More Resets With Russia

Washington should not talk itself into accepting Moscow’s aggression—again.

An employee sorts Turkish lira banknotes at a bank in the town of Sarmada in Syria’s northwestern Idlib province on June 14.

Erdogan Has Hidden an Economic Disaster Deep in Turkish Banks

And he won’t be able to keep the game going for much longer.

A farm worker fertilizes wheat at Ivordale Farm outside Harare, Zimbabwe, on Aug. 1, 2018.

Don’t Give Zimbabwe’s Government Aid Until It Gets Serious About Land Reform

Land reform isn’t just about compensating white farmers whose land was expropriated. It must secure the property rights of Black farmers, too.

Sri Lanka Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa arrives at his swearing-in ceremony outside Colombo on Aug. 9.

Rajapaksa, in a Landslide

After a major victory, the family will be able to reshape Sri Lanka to ensure their control for the long term.

A picture taken on Aug. 9 shows graffiti on the wall of a bridge overlooking the port of Beirut, the site of the explosion which killed at least 154 people and devastated swathes of the capital.

Will Lebanon Rise From the Ashes?

After decades of living in denial, the country has hit rock bottom—but glimmers of a brighter future are starting to emerge.

A protester confronts security forces during an anti-government protest at Parliament on August 10 in Beirut, Lebanon.

Lebanon Needs Transformation, Not Another Corrupt Unity Government

If the United States lets France take the lead, the Lebanese people will get more political paralysis, cosmetic reforms, and Hezbollah control of state institutions.

People protest against corruption in Lima on January 3, 2019.

How to Tackle Coronavirus Corruption

Latin American governments have a chance to model a better version of the inspector general, with even greater autonomy, to address graft in the public health sector.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro

Under Cover of Coronavirus, Maduro Is Consolidating Control

As the pandemic continues to stress the country’s collapsing health system, Venezuela’s president has bolstered his political ground.

Police stands guard around the statue of Jan Pieterszoon Coen in Hoorn, the Netherlands, on June 19.

The Dutch Are Uncomfortable With Being History’s Villains, Not Victims

A refusal to confront colonial atrocities persists in the Netherlands.

Syrian police show seized drugs and Captagon pills in Damascus on Jan. 4, 2016.

The Islamic State Isn’t Behind Syria’s Amphetamine Trade

After a record seizure, Italian police blamed the terror group. It’s more likely the Syrian regime has a hand in production and trafficking.

A Chilean demonstrator holds a Mapuche Indigenous flag

Toppling Statues Isn’t Enough in Latin America

Rethinking the past is a tough challenge when colonial structures run deep.

Lebanese protesters clash with security forces in the vicinity of the Parliament in central Beirut on Aug. 10, following a huge chemical explosion days earlier that devastated large parts of the Lebanese capital.

Lebanon’s Government Has Resigned. That’s Not Nearly Enough.

The Lebanese public wants answers and accountability for last week’s port explosion—not scapegoats.

South Korean demonstrators hold banners during a rally to mark International Women's Day as part of the country's #MeToo movement in Seoul on March 8, 2018.

South Korea Needs to Contend With Sexual Violence

The failed extradition of a child pornographer highlights the Korean legal system’s laxity toward a certain kind of criminal.

Newly released child soldiers stand with rifles during their release ceremony in Yambio, South Sudan, on February 7, 2018.

The U.N. Secretary-General Is Letting Powerful Countries Get Away With Killing Kids

By removing Saudi Arabia and other serial violators of children’s human rights from the annual list of shame, António Guterres is weakening one of the U.N.’s most effective accountability mechanisms.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and China's President Xi Jinping attend a meeting in Shanghai on May 22, 2014.

Iran’s Pact With China Is Bad News for the West

Tehran’s new strategic partnership with Beijing will give the Chinese a strategic foothold and strengthen Iran’s economy and regional clout.

Crowds gather for an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus, on Aug. 6.

Europe Must Stand Up for Belarus

The crisis has come at the worst possible time, but red lines must be set.

Hassan Ayad sticks his hand through concrete blocks as he is congratulated by a friend on his recent engagement while the two Palestinian men stand on opposite sides of Israel's security wall in East Jerusalem on September 23, 2003.

Oslo Is Dead, the Two-State Solution Isn’t

A two-state solution remains the only politically viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—and, with the right Israeli and U.S. leaders, it can be achieved outside the Oslo framework.

A woman carries a small Russian flag with the lettering reading "Freedom for Sergei Furgal", during an unauthorised rally in support of Sergei Furgal in the Russian far eastern city of Khabarovsk on Aug. 1.

Normal Is Over for Russia’s Hinterland

The ongoing protests in Russia’s far east aren’t a one-off—they’re a preview of the future of the country’s periphery.

A man wearing a face mask walks along a street of Havana on July 29.

Coronavirus Victories May Not Be Enough for Cuba

Health care success could inspire economic change, but the future still looks bleak.

Russian President Vladimir Putin talks to his Kazakh counterpart Nursultan Nazarbayev in Baku, Azerbaijan in December 2003.

Putin Is Ruling Russia Like a Central Asian Dictator

The Kremlin didn’t invent term limit resets and constitutional referendums. The autocratic leaders of Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan blazed the trail.

A U.S. serviceman bids farewell to his friend prior to the departure of a detachment of U.S. military police by train from the Coleman Barracks in Mannheim, Germany to Bosnia via Hungary in 1995.

Auf Wiedersehen to a Mostly Successful, Sometimes Rocky Arranged Marriage

From economic woes to racial strife, America’s troop presence in Germany hasn’t always been easy. But it always made an impact.

A Lebanese couple inspect the damage to their house in an area overlooking the destroyed Beirut Port on Aug. 5, in the aftermath of a pair of massive explosions in the Lebanese capital.

The Beirut Blast Is Lebanon’s Chernobyl

Negligence and corruption have caused a devastating disaster.

Soviet Red Army soldiers march in downtown Kabul during a military parade in October 1986.

Russia Is Winning the Information War in Afghanistan

The country’s former occupier is using Kremlin-backed media to fuel anger toward the United States.

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