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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

India and Japan Eye the Dragon in the Room

An upcoming 2+2 meeting can help cement the new special relationship.

A protective blast wall painted by a U.S. military unit stands at an air base in the Persian Gulf on Jan. 8, 2016.

In Future Wars, the U.S. Military Will Have Nowhere to Hide

New technologies enable Russia and China to destroy U.S. bases and logistics networks—including those on the homeland.

Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks at the Environmental Justice Presidential Candidate Forum at South Carolina State University on November 8, 2019 in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Warren’s Plan to Rebuild the State Department Doesn’t Go Far Enough

Adding 8,000 foreign service officers won’t solve America’s diplomatic problems. State needs to prioritize data science, expand strategic planning, and encourage mid-career training, too.

View of a burnt area of the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, the capital of the Brazilian state of Rondônia, on Aug. 26.

After Brazil’s Summer of Fire, the Militarization of the Amazon Remains

Bolsonaro sent the troops to put out the flames, but now they may be looking to other enemies.

A protester holds up an umbrella at Prince Edward MTR station as he and other protesters take a vote on which location to proceed to next in Hong Kong on Aug. 10.

Hong Kong’s Silent Majority Can Speak at the Ballot Box

The upcoming vote is a prime test of public opinion—if the government lets it happen.

An Indian technician inspects components on an assembly line at Highly Electrical Appliances India Pvt. Ltd. outside of Ahmedabad on Dec. 8, 2016.

Modi Was Right. India Isn’t Ready for Free Trade.

Until the country can address its own economic problems, agreements like the RCEP may do more harm than good.

Sri Lanka's new president Gotabaya Rajapaksa

The Rajapaksas Own Sri Lanka Now

Victory for the hard-line political dynasty spells dark times for democracy.

Swedish Commander in Chief Sverker Goranson talks to media after a nearly two-hour-long meeting with the Swedish parliament defense committee in Stockholm on their fifth day of searching for a suspected foreign vessel in the Stockholm archipelago on Oct. 21, 2014.

Loose Lips Sink Democracies?

Russia has started using the West’s own reporting against it. Here’s how to respond.

A crowd gathering for a demonstration organized by the Campaign Against Antisemitism outside the head office of the British opposition Labour Party

The Hard Left Is Hurting Palestine

When real solutions are left out because of hatred of Israel, Palestinians lose.

Russian troops raise a national flag on top of their armored personnel vehicle while on patrol with Turkish forces in Syria’s northeastern Hasakah province on Nov. 1.

Don’t Believe the Hype. Russia Is Losing in the Middle East—and Around the World.

Putin’s apparent victories in spreading Russian influence are mirages, some of which have come at a great cost.

People take pictures during the opening ceremony for the Shanghai Stock Exchange's Sci-Tech Innovation Board in Shanghai on July 22, 2019.

If the United States Doesn’t Make The Rules, China Will

Progressives need to learn how to use American market power for good.

At least three barges and one ship, the Courier, ran aground after they broke free from their moorings during Hurricane Gustav in New Orleans on Sept. 2, 2008.

Climate Change Is Coming for Global Trade

As sea levels rise and storms become fiercer, container shipping could be in for major disruptions.

Santiago Abascal, the leader of Spain's far-right Vox party, delivers a speech during a rally southwest of Barcelona on Oct. 31.

The Left Will Govern Spain, but the Far-Right Is the Real Winner

Spain used to be seen as Europe’s exception due to its lack of an ultranationalist xenophobic party. Now the upstart Vox holds more than 50 seats in the parliament.

An armed Libyan coast guardsman stands on a boat after the interception of 147 migrants attempting to reach Europe near the coastal town of Zawiyah on June 27, 2017.

The West’s Obsession With Border Security Is Breeding Instability

In the name of fighting illegal immigration, the EU, the United States, and Australia are emboldening authoritarian regimes, fueling abuses and corruption, and stoking intolerance at home.

Smoke billows from a fire that broke out at the North Oil Company installations in the disputed oil-rich province of Kirkuk, north of Baghdad, on Aug. 29.

The Future of Iraq’s Oil Is Russian

With ongoing protests making other investors nervous, Moscow is charging ahead.

Ethiopian builders work on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam near the Sudanese-Ethiopian border on March 31, 2015.

River of the Dammed

Ethiopia’s continued efforts to dam the Nile could end in war with Egypt. Here’s how to stop that from happening.

Visitors check out 5G smart city technology at the China Mobile booth

China’s Surveillance State Has Eyes on Central Asia

Autocrats are handing their citizens’ data to Beijing under so-called smart city programs.

Indigenous leaders listen to Sonia Guajajara, the head of Brazil’s Indigenous People Articulation, as she speaks during a press conference on November 12 in Paris, as part of a tour calling on EU lawmakers to exert pressure on the Brazilian government to better protect the rights of indigenous communities, and scrutinize companies profiting from deforestation in the Amazon.

Brazil’s Amazon—and Its Defenders—Are Under Attack From Illegal Loggers

The killing of an indigenous forest guardian is only the latest incident in a pattern of impunity with consequences far beyond Brazil’s borders.

A woman walks past a television showing file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watching a missile launch, in Seoul on July 31.

New U.S. Missiles in Asia Could Increase the North Korean Nuclear Threat

After withdrawing from the INF Treaty, U.S. officials have been worrying about Beijing, but as Washington starts to deploy previously banned missiles in the Pacific, the real risk will come from Pyongyang.

Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra (right) shakes hands with his Bolivian counterpart, Evo Morales, during their fifth joint staff meeting in Peru on June 25.

Latin America Is Too Polarized to Help Stabilize Bolivia

Riven by ideological divisions and facing a lack of adequate regional mechanisms, neighboring countries cannot even agree on whether Evo Morales’s ouster constitutes a coup.

Japanese women dressed in kimonos take a ride on a roller coaster

Japan’s Topsy-Turvy Economy Is the United States’ Economic Future

The Japanese economy has been living in a fantasy world for decades, and the U.S. economy could soon be joining it there.

Workers line up to sing communist "red" songs at an instant noodle factory run by Nanjie village in China's central Henan province.

Chinese Firms Can’t Avoid Being Party Tools

The sale of British Steel is a dangerous foothold for Chinese Communist Party power in the U.K.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley hold a news conference at the Pentagon on Oct. 28.

The United States Can’t Have It All

The debacle over Syria shows that neither party understands the country’s real goals in the Middle East—or what it would take to achieve them.

A picture on display shows a Nike missile at one of the facilities that were used to store and potentially launch both conventional and nuclear-tipped Nike missiles in reaction to any Russian attack in Florida on April 8, 2010.

The United States’ Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Weapons Are Dangerously Entangled

New evidence from the Yom Kippur War shows how such knots can lead to nuclear annihilation.

An Iranian woman walks past a new mural painted on the walls of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran

Tehran Paints Over Its Anti-American Murals

The city’s old public art showed a United States to be feared. The new ones depict a country that is weaker, more laughable, and riddled with its own problems.

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