Argument

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the Black Sea resort of Sochi on Feb. 14.

Russia Has Won the Information War in Turkey

The Kremlin doesn’t even need fake news to push its agenda on Turkish social media. Because domestic disinformation is rampant, Moscow has managed to infect both sides of the debate.

Actress Shefali Shah in “Delhi Crime.” (Golden Karavan/Netflix)

Delhi Crime and Punishment

Netflix’s hit show Delhi Crime documents the changes rocking Indian society—and not all of them are good.

Chinese workers construct a shopping mall at a retail and office complex, part of 
a Chinese-backed building boom in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in November 2018. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Catching China by the Belt (and Road)

How Washington can beat Beijing’s global influence campaign.

Former Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubeye Maiga (2L) is received in Mopti on his visit to Mali's central region on October 14, 2018. (Photo by Michele Cattani/ AFP/Getty Images)

Dumping One Government Won’t Fix Mali

March’s deadly massacre exposed the lack of progress since the country’s peace accords—and the many political and security reforms that are needed.

French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, and French President Emmanuel Macron near the entrance of the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris, as flames engulf its roof on April 15, 2019. (Philippe Wojazer/AFP/Getty Images)

Notre Dame Is Setting Macron’s Agenda Ablaze

A national catastrophe is ruining the French president’s plans for a revival.

People protesting against a new government measure to further restrict abortions in Poland gather as part of "Black Friday" demonstrations nationwide on March 23, 2018 in Poznan, Poland. The women's rights group Dziewuchy Dziewuchom, called on women across Poland to gather for protests in cities nationwide.

Politics Without Parties

From Poland to Iceland, citizens’ groups are taking matters into their own hands and bringing about genuine political change from outside the party system.

Donald Trump meets Vladimir Putin at the opening of the G20 summit on July 7, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. (Steffen Kugler/BPA via Getty Images)

Mueller’s Bombshells Are About Putin, Not Trump

The special counsel’s report reveals a disorganized government with unclear lines of authority—and not just in Washington.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) speaks  as Foxconn CEO Terry Gou (C) and U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) watch at the groundbreaking for a Foxconn plant on June 28, 2018 in Mt Pleasant, Wisconsin.  (Photo by Andy Manis/Getty Images)

The Billionaire and the Mayor Disrupting Taiwan’s Elections

Star politician Han Kuo-yu or Foxconn leader Terry Gou could lead the country — if they can convince people they don't work for China.

Ukrainian presidential candidate Volodymyr Zelensky enters a hall in Kiev on March 6, 2019. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Should Fear Ukraine’s Russia-Friendly Front-Runner

The Kremlin will soon wish it were still dealing with a Ukrainian president who so much resembled its own.

Rohingya refugees shout slogans at a protest against a disputed repatriation program at the Unchiprang refugee camp near Teknaf on Nov. 15, 2018. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Bureaucrats Just Want the Rohingya Off Their Plate

Dumping refugees on a doomed island in Bangladesh is as callous as it is predictable.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad  shakes hands with U.S. under secretary for political affairs William Burns ahead of their meeting in Damascus on Feb 17, 2010. (Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images)

The Long Rise and Sudden Fall of American Diplomacy

One of Washington's most accomplished diplomats has traced how U.S. foreign policy went astray over decades—and how it can get back on track.

Cars drive on a new Israeli road divided by a wall to separate it for Palestinians (L) and the side to be used exclusively by Israelis and settlers (R) in East Jerusalem, on January 10, 2019. Route 4370 connects the settlement of Geva Binyamin to the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway. The road, which has been called the Apartheid Road, is divided in the middle by a 25-foot wall.

Separation and a Two-State Solution Aren’t the Same

Netanyahu is not the only one who opposes basic Palestinian rights. Almost all Israeli leaders reject the fundamental tenets of sovereignty that would make a Palestinian state genuine and viable.

Indonesian incumbent Presidential candidate Joko Widodo and his vice presidential candidate Maruf Amin (R), wave during a press conference after the general election on April 17, 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Islam Is the Winning Ticket in Indonesia

Politics has turned religious in the world's biggest Muslim nation — but that's part of democracy too.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, attend a ceremony marking the completion of the sea part of the TurkStream gas pipeline in Istanbul on Nov. 19, 2018. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s Gas Web Ensnares Europe

New pipeline projects throughout the Middle East could boost Russian influence there while also ensuring the country’s role as the prime supplier of energy to Europe.

An Ultra-Orthodox Israeli man, accompanied by his children, prepares to cast his ballot at a polling station in Bnei Brak, near the city of Tel Aviv, on March 17, 2015.

The Ultra-Orthodox Will Determine Israel’s Political Future

Netanyahu’s embrace and the left’s hostility have made the fast-growing Haredi Jewish population the right’s most reliable constituency.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, and Zhihang Chi, Air China's vice president for North America, at Los Angeles International Airport on Feb. 19, 2015. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Cities Will Determine the Future of Diplomacy

Urban centers are taking international relations into their own hands.

A youth sleeps beside a campaign banner as people gather for an election campaign rally for Indonesian presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto and his running mate Sandiaga Uno outside the Gelora Bung Karno stadium in Jakarta on April 7, 2019. (Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Indonesians Fight for Their Right to Not Vote

It's an act of protest—but the government calls it terrorism.

A peatland forest burns to make way for a palm oil plantation on Nov. 1, 2015, on the outskirts of Palangkaraya, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Whoever Wins Indonesia’s Presidential Election, Indigenous People Will Lose

Millions of Indonesians lack basic protections. The presidential contenders don’t seem to care.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

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