Dispatch

A man prays at the burial of a friend on January 16, 2018 in Nairobi, Kenya after al-Shabab militants stormed the Dusit hotel complex.

Al-Shabab Wants You To Know It’s Alive and Well

The brutal attack in Kenya is designed to show Washington and the world that the terrorist group is still a force to be reckoned with in East Africa.

A Chinese police officer takes his position by the road near what is officially called a “vocational education and training program” in Yining, in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Detainees Are Trickling Out of Xinjiang’s Camps

House arrest or forced labor awaits most of those released so far in what may be a public relations ploy.

Arab-Israelis—also known as Palestinian citizens in Israel—wave Palestinian flags at a Land Day demonstration in the village of Araba in the Galilee on March 30, 2018. (Jalaa Marey/AFP/Getty Images)

Palestinian in Israel

The population the government refers to as "Arab-Israeli" is increasingly embracing the term "Palestinian."

Vice-chairman of the Momentum party Anna Donath at a protest in downtown Budapest on Dec. 16, 2018. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)

Hungary Finally Has an Opposition Worth a Damn

The country’s youngest party has united the left and right against Viktor Orban.

A Moroccan draped in the Berber, or Amazigh, flag shouts slogans while marching during a protest against the jailing of Al-Hirak or "Popular Movement" activists in the capital Rabat on July 15, 2018.

Morocco’s Crackdown Won’t Silence Dissent

Across the country, protesters are increasingly willing to criticize the government and the monarchy—even in the face of repression.

Demonstrators during a march commemorating victims of Gambia's former regime, in Serekunda, on April 10, 2017.

Truth First, Reconciliation Later

After decades of dictatorship, Gambia has launched a truth commission. But in a country where some victims were also perpetrators, delivering justice to all won’t be easy.

Hanna Barczyk illustration for Foreign Policy

China’s #MeToo Activists Have Transformed a Generation

A small group of feminists has shifted attitudes—and prompted harsh pushback.

Protesters attend an anti-government demonstration in support of abortion rights in Warsaw on April 9, 2016.

Poland Is Trying to Make Abortion Dangerous, Illegal, and Impossible

Ireland voted to liberalize abortion laws. The far-right government in Warsaw is moving in the opposite direction.

A Greek Orthodox altar boy carries a cross before participating in a procession, during the community's Christmas celebrations, outside the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem on Jan. 6. (Musa al-Shaer/AFP/Getty Images)

Holy Land for Sale

The Greek Orthodox Patriarchate is selling church land that’s ending up in the hands of Israeli settler groups. Its Palestinian Christian congregants are furious.

A Nepalese woman prepares to sleep in a chhaupadi hut during her period in Surkhet District, 300 miles west of Kathmandu. Feb. 3, 2017.

In Nepal, Tradition Is Killing Women

The Hindu practice of chhaupadi is dangerous and deadly, but legislation is not enough to stop it.

More than 100,000 shared bikes are piled up in an open space in Xiamen, China, on Jan. 13. (Wang Dongming/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images)

The Rise and Fall of China’s Cycling Empires

China’s bike-sharing firms were supposed to be the next big thing. What happened?

A farmer carries a sack of coca leaves in a field in the Guaviare department, Colombia, on Sept. 25, 2017. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

Swapping Cocaine for Peace

A voluntary coca crop substitution initiative in Colombia is failing. It is still the country’s best option to address its cocaine production problem.

Michée Yolona Selenga of the Independent National Electoral Commission tests an electronic voting machine during a voter information session in Mbenzale near Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 21. (Holly Pickett for Foreign Policy)

Congo Wanted an Election. This Isn’t What It Meant.

The country will vote for a new government, and then brace for a violent aftermath.

Nikol Pashinyan casting his ballot during early parliamentary elections in Yerevan on Dec. 9, 2018. (Karen Minasayan/ AFP/Getty Images)

Armenia’s Revolution Will Not be Monopolized

An Armenian protest leader just secured the office of prime minister by a landslide—but, thanks to his own efforts, he’ll still face plenty of opposition.

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South Africans Are Taking the Law Into Their Own Hands

In a country where no one trusts the police, vigilante groups promising to stop gang violence were initially welcomed. Now, with extralegal justice on the rise, some citizens have had enough.

Far-right activists hold flares during a rally in support of martial law and cutting ties with Russia in front of the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev on Nov. 26. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Martial Law Is a Test. Will Ukraine’s Democracy Pass?

Ukraine’s parliament resisted President Petro Poroshenko’s call for an extended state of emergency—but the battle isn’t over yet.

Herto Hamrash Minut, 74, sits outside his house on Sinjar Mountain, where he lives with his two wives and 12 children. Four years ago, he was kidnapped and tortured by the Islamic State for eight months. (Sam Mednick for Foreign Policy)

ISIS May Be Gone, But Iraq’s Yazidis Are Still Suffering

The defeat of the Islamic State has created a power vacuum in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, leaving the Yazidi minority at the mercy of competing militias.

An election official sits in an empty polling station during local elections on October 30, 2018, in the Shuafat neighborhood of East Jerusalem.

Why There’s No Palestinian Protest Vote in Jerusalem

Candidates who ran for local office were subjected to violent threats by fellow Palestinians, but they have vowed to do it again.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Swedish Speaker of Parliament Andreas Norlen (L) meets with Moderate party leader Ulf Kristersson (R) at the Parliament in Stockholm on September 27, 2018.

Swedish Leaders Will Try Anything to Shut Out the Far-Right

No one wants to enter a coalition with the Sweden Democrats, so the country is resorting to desperate and untested measures to form a new government.

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