Dispatch

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pictured.

Parliament Is Skeptical About Boris’s Brexit Deal

Still, if the new agreement fails to gain approval, the public may not blame Johnson at the polls.

Scottish National Party Member of Parliament Ian Blackford joins celebrations marking five years since Scotland's independence referendum.

Scotland Could Leave the United Kingdom Over Brexit—and Green Energy

The debate over how to best marshal the country's alternative energy sources may affect a new independence referendum.

A woman walks past campaign posters for candidates of the Law and Justice party in Warsaw, Poland, on Oct. 9.

A Tale of Two Polands

The Law and Justice party is tapping into divides that have split the country for centuries—and will probably win this weekend’s elections because of it.

Protesters hold a giant Polish national flag during a demonstration against a judicial reform pushed through by the right-wing government but criticised by the EU as a threat to judicial independence on July 24, 2018 in Warsaw.

Poland Is Purging Its Prosecutors

The PiS government is rooting out, relocating, and demoting political critics in the name of judicial reform.

Protesters hold signs against the ongoing restrictions of the internet and mobile phone networks at the Kashmir Press Club in Srinagar on Oct. 3.

For Kashmiri Graduates, India’s Clampdown Is ‘Like Death’

With the repeal of Article 370, India has opened the way for fierce competition over scarce government jobs.

Riot police protect a pride parade amid risks of disruption by far-right opponents in Plock, central Poland, on Aug. 10.

In Poland’s Upcoming Election, the Law and Justice Party Is Demonizing the LGBT Community to Win

The party is likely to win the vote, but it may eventually lose the broader cultural fight.

Iraqi protesters speak to police

Angry Iraqis Demand New Government

After 15 years of corruption, Iraqi protesters have finally reached a breaking point. Some even want military rule.

Workers at the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing

Does the World’s Longest Undersea Tunnel Have a China Problem?

A Chinese-financed project to connect the Estonian and Finnish capitals has hit a snag as Europe ponders how to deal with Beijing’s economic heft.

Seyil Eldos with his three younger brothers on the outskirts of Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, on May 17. Eldos’s biological father died of a heart attack, and his mother married her husband’s younger brother, as is traditional. Eldos’s three brothers were born to the second marriage.

A Family Stranded by China’s Camps

Repression in Xinjiang leaves tens of thousands of children without parents.

Jean Ghodjendji radios back to colleagues at an advance post during a foot patrol in Bamingui-Bangoran National Park in the Central African Republic while fellow rangers scan the forest on May 18.

Central Africa’s Rangers Are as Threatened as the Animals They Guard

Park staff struggle to protect the animals—and themselves—against poachers and militias.

Missing Ayotzinapa students' parents march on the fifth anniversary of their disappearance in Iguala, Mexico.

For Mexico’s President, Forced Disappearances Could Make or Break the Justice System

A new investigation into the 2014 Ayotzinapa case may bring more answers but doesn’t guarantee real changes.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Japan.

Xi Jinping Has Embraced Vladimir Putin—for Now

But the Russia-China flirtation may not last forever. As in the classic novel “Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” the Chinese can be calculating about alliances.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson following his keynote speech at the 2019 Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, on Oct. 2.

Johnson Shifts His Political Calculations on Brexit

The prime minister now expects there will be a delay, but he thinks voters will reward him at the polls for trying.

Ten-year-old Bilal Habibulla poses with his drawing of the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, Xinjiang, at his home in Istanbul on April 27. The Id Kah Mosque is a symbol for the Uighur culture.

The Capital of Xinjiang Is Now in Turkey

Ethnic cleansing of Uighurs in China has forced an exodus to Istanbul—and a desperate effort to keep their culture alive.

Security guards patrol outside the election headquarters of Afghan President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul on Sept. 24 as they prepare for the upcoming presidential election.

Risking Life and Limb to Vote in Afghanistan

Many Afghans say the threat of violence is too great to risk coming out to the polls.

A child walks through a Taliban-controlled area in Baghlan province, Afghanistan, in April.

In Afghanistan, It’s Brother Against Brother

How one family’s story illustrates the meaninglessness of Saturday’s election in the face of an endless civil war.

People stand in line to check their names on the final list of India's National Register of Citizens in a village some 40 miles from Guwahati, the largest city of the northeastern state of Assam, on Aug. 31.

All Are Stateless. Some Are Hopeless.

Hindus left stateless in Assam think Modi will save them. Muslims fear the worst.

An illustration picture shows pills, tablets, caplets, and capsules of medicine in Lille on May 7, 2017.

Addicted in Bhutan

The country’s substance use spike is undermining its focus on gross national happiness.

A Kashmiri muslim throws back a can of tear gas shot by Indian police on Feb. 05, 2010 in Srinagar, Kashmir, India.

Inside Kashmir’s New Anti-Indian Resistance

Cut off from the outside world, Kashmiris are digging trenches, starting strikes, and preparing for a long fight ahead.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives for a meeting with United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres at the U.N. General Assembly in New York on Sept. 24.

Now It’s Really ‘Do or Die’ for Boris Johnson

Following a high court ruling that his suspension of Parliament was unlawful, the lame-duck British prime minister will have to confront a hostile Commons.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left) greets Benny Gantz, the leader of Blue and White party, at a memorial ceremony for late Israeli President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem on Sept. 19.

Why Bibi’s on Borrowed Time

If the election hasn’t killed the Israeli leader’s political career, the indictments probably will.

A man suspected of belonging to the Islamic State group, who spoke to journalists in French, leans on the back of a truck as he waits to be searched by members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces just after leaving the Islamic State's last holdout of Baghouz, in the eastern Syrian province of Deir Ezzor on March 4.

They Left to Join ISIS. Now Europe Is Leaving Their Citizens to Die in Iraq.

A Belgian fighter captured in Syria was transported to Iraq to face trial. He's now on death row.

A Greenland ice melt lake atop the sheet, seen from 5,000 feet above, in August. Across Greenland’s massive ice sheet, blue pools of melted water, forming icy lakes, dot the landscape as far as the eye can see.

Greenland Is the Center of the World

The Arctic island offers a harrowing reminder of the environmental damage, and political dangers, already imposed by climate change.

Activists with green handkerchiefs, which symbolizes the abortion rights movement, demonstrate to mark the revival of their campaign to legalize abortion, in front of the National Congress in Buenos Aires, on May 28.

Young Voters Care About Abortion Policy. Argentine Politicians Are Ignoring Them.

The youth vote is becoming increasingly important in Argentina, but the leading presidential candidates are deliberately avoiding the issue that matters most to them.

Demonstrators demand the resignation of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Aug. 7

Honduran Protesters Have Little Cause for Hope

Even if President Juan Orlando Hernández were to leave office, the country’s problems would persist.

Indian security personnel walk on a street in Srinagar on August 9, 2019,

Kashmir’s Paramilitary Lockdown Traps Locals

Witnesses say travel is nearly impossible and communications have been severed.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper is presented a horse by Mongolia's defense minister, Nyamaagiin Enkhbold, in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, on Aug. 8.

In Rare Mongolia Stop, U.S. Defense Secretary Gets an Unusual Gift

Esper’s visit is designed to send a pointed signal to Mongolia’s neighbors: Russia and China.

From left, Ethiopian mediator Mahmoud Drir, protest leader Ahmed al-Rabie, and Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, Sudan's deputy head of the Transitional Military Council, celebrate after signing the constitutional declaration in Khartoum on Aug. 4.

How Sudan’s Military Overcame the Revolution

Sudan’s protesters wanted to overthrow their president and his regime. They were only half-successful.

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky looks on during a press conference after a meeting with president of the European Council at the European Council in Brussels on June 5.

Welcome to Ukraine’s Post-Post-Maidan Era

Ukraine’s president now has an unprecedented level of parliamentary support. What will he do with it?

Ukraine's then-president, Petro Poroshenko, listens to then-presidential candidate and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky during an election debate in Kiev on April 19.

Once Again, Ukraine Steps Into the Unknown

A comedian-turned-president, a rockstar-turned-party leader, and a sea of new faces in the parliament: Meet the new political reality in Ukraine.

Members of the army carry a coffin covered with the Ethiopian flag in Addis Ababa on June 25, in preparation for the funeral service of the Chief of Staff of the Ethiopian National Defense Force, Seare Mekonnen, who was assassinated on June 22.

Abiy Ahmed’s Reforms Have Unleashed Forces He Can No Longer Control

Ethiopia’s prime minister oversaw the chaotic release of thousands of prisoners, including many ethnonationalist militants. His amnesty may now be coming back to haunt him.

Han Kuo-yu at a rally in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on Nov. 24, 2018.

Chinese Cyber-Operatives Boosted Taiwan’s Insurgent Candidate

Han Kuo-yu came out of nowhere to win a critical election. But he had a little help from the mainland.

A protester wearing a red eye patch attends a rally in front of the Georgian Parliament building in Tbilisi on June 21.

In Georgia’s Parliament, One Russian Too Many

Following violent unrest, the speaker of the Georgian Parliament steps down after a Russian lawmaker sat in his chair.

Italian Deputy Prime Minister and Interior Minister Matteo Salvini delivers a speech holding a rosary during a rally of European nationalists ahead of European elections on May 18, in Milan.

Papa, Don’t Preach

Italy’s far-right deputy prime minister, Matteo Salvini, is publicly attacking the pope in a battle for the country’s soul.

Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of People in Beijing on April 25.

Big Brother Comes to Belgrade

Chinese facial recognition software has arrived in Serbia. It confirms the West’s worst fears about Huawei.

Policemen and residents demonstrate in the office of the main policy labor union in Tunis, Tunisia on Oct. 28, 2013.

Tunisia’s Authoritarians Learn to Love Liberalism

Police unions are using their country’s newfound freedoms to protect themselves—and attack freedom fighters.

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