Dispatch

A French woman, Djamila Boutoutaou, attends her trial at the Central Criminal Court in Baghdad on April 17, 2018. She was sentenced to life in prison for belonging to the Islamic State.

How Europe Is Handing Off Its ISIS Militants to Iraq

France is leading the way in washing its hands of its Islamic State fighters—whether they receive justice or not.

Policemen and residents demonstrate in the office of the main policy labor union in Tunis, Tunisia on Oct. 28, 2013.

Tunisia’s Authoritarians Learn to Love Liberalism

Police unions are using their country’s newfound freedoms to protect themselves—and attack freedom fighters.

Kazakh president-elect Kassym-Jomart Tokayev speaks to the media during a press conference at Ak Orda Presidential Palace in Nur-Sultan on June 10, 2019.

Kazakhstan’s Second-Ever President Can’t Tolerate Protest

Nazarbayev’s successor has an impressive foreign profile but a raft of domestic problems.

A child stands on the T-34 Soviet tank set as a monument in the center of Tiraspol, capital of self-proclaimed  Moldovan Republic of Transnistria on April 3, 2017.

Transnistria Isn’t the Smuggler’s Paradise It Used to Be

The separatist territory sandwiched between Moldova and Ukraine has long thrived on porous frontiers and Russian backing, but Kiev has changed its tune and might be dragging it back toward the West.

Serbian children play in the playground of the condominium where they live, on Nov. 24, 2007 in Mitrovica, Kosovo.

Playacting the Cold War in Kosovo

The Balkans are center stage for new tensions between Russia and the West—but how real is the action?

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with Jared Kushner in Jerusalem on June 21, 2017.

New Vote in Israel Puts Trump’s Deal of the Century on Ice

Parliament votes to dissolves itself after Netanyahu failed to form a majority coalition.

Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Javad Zarif and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov meet in Moscow on May 8.

Trump Is Driving Iran into Russia’s Arms

U.S. sanctions won’t necessarily isolate Tehran. They could spur new strategic alliances.

Sinjar city, seen in March 2017, remains severely damaged and largely deserted years after Islamic State militants were pushed out.

How ISIS Still Threatens Iraq

Roiled with internal divisions, Iraqi forces struggle to fully eliminate the Islamic State.

Two workers paint the European Union flag on the side of a building in Paris on May 23.

How European Politics Is Fracturing

Sunday’s vote shows that mainstream centrist parties are losing their traditional constituencies as voters hunger for new voices.

British Prime Minister Theresa May announces her resignation outside No. 10 Downing St. in London on May 24.

Theresa May’s Successor May Be Just as Doomed

Whoever takes over will face the same intractable Brexit dilemmas.

Sudanese protesters wave flags and flash victory signs as they protest outside the army complex in the capital Khartoum on April 17. OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

The Counterrevolution Begins in Sudan

Omar al-Bashir is gone, but his system is fighting back. The result is total stalemate—for now.

Asylum Seeker Rahaf al-Qanun smiles as she is introduced to the media at Toronto Pearson International Airport on Jan. 12, alongside Canadian minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland.

When Home Is a Prison, More Saudi Women Are Choosing to Flee

The latest refugees from the kingdom fled to Tbilisi, Georgia, and spoke to Foreign Policy before seeking asylum in the West.

Juma Khan gathers with neighbors on March 31 at the site of what appears to be a U.S. airstrike in which 13 members of an extended family, including his daughter, son-in-law, and numerous grandchildren, were killed in the village of Aqulabul, near Telawka, north of Kunduz, Afghanistan, on March 22.

U.S. Raises the Stakes in Afghanistan From the Air

Civilian deaths mount as Washington tries to pressure the Taliban in peace talks.

Ambazonia Military Forces General John, who says he commands thousands of rebel soldiers in Ambazonia, poses with his bodyguards in Borrere, Cameroon, the Ambazonian flag proudly hanging behind them, on Feb. 13.

Cameroon’s Separatist Movement Is Going International

Armed groups are slipping into Nigeria and appealing to the Cameroonian diaspora to fuel their fight for a breakaway state.

Venezuelans cross improvised walkways over the border at the Táchira River, between Cúcuta, Colombia, and San Antonio Del Táchira, Venezuela, on March 18. Some are refugees fleeing the country, others go to retrieve supplies that are scarce in Venezuela as a result of the ongoing political and economic crisis.

Venezuela’s Exile Economy

In Colombia, refugees are changing how cities work.

A Somali soldier at Sanguuni military base south of Mogadishu on June 13, 2018.

Does America Know Who Its Airstrike Victims Are?

A recent strike in Somalia raises questions about whether Africom investigates civilian casualties.

China's President Xi Jinping (second from left) and Panama's Juan Carlos Varela (second from right) wave flanked by first ladies Peng Liyuan (left) and Lorena Castillo (right) at the newly inaugurated Cocoli locks in the Panama Canal, on Dec. 3, 2018.

The Panama Canal Could Become the Center of the U.S.-China Trade War

Panama’s strategic and symbolic importance place it at the heart of growing trade tensions.

Members of Warduj’s Afghan Local Police unit in front of their main base in their exile in Bahorak on Aug. 24, 2018.

Beijing Eyes Afghanistan’s Intimate Wars

Afghan militia members driven from their homes square off against Uighur exiles.

Sudanese demonstrators gather in central Khartoum after the toppling of President Omar al-Bashir on April 11. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

A People Power Bid to Defy History in Sudan

As talks between the military junta and civilians stall, demonstrators thronging the streets say this won’t be just another Arab Spring outcome.

Spanish conservative People's Party leader  Pablo Casado (C), secretary general Teodoro García Egea (L), and the party's number two candidate Adolfo Suárez Illana (R) attend an election night gathering in Madrid after Spain held general elections on Apr. 28.

Pablo Casado Was Meant to Save Spain’s Center-Right. He Destroyed It.

Spain’s conservatives lost more than half their seats in parliament by trying to outbid the far-right.

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