Elephants in the Room

A Sudanese man holds bags to build a barricade amid flood waters in Tuti island, where the Blue and White Nile merge between the twin cities of Khartoum and Omdurman, on Sept. 3.

The White House Wants Peace With Sudan. Congress Wants Khartoum to Pay.

Normalizing ties with Israel could mean removal from the U.S. state sponsors of terrorism list, allowing the country to rebuild its shattered economy—but U.S. legislators are standing in the way.

Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu, U.S. President Donald Trump, and Foreign Affairs Minister of the United Arab Emirates Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan participate in the signing ceremony of the Abraham Accords on the South Lawn of the White House on Sept. 15.

Palestinians Can’t Stand In the Way of Israel’s Regional Integration

Deals with the UAE and Bahrain demonstrate the Palestinian issue is no longer a barrier to Israeli-Arab cooperation.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, on Jan. 27, 2017.

This Election Has Become Dangerous for the U.S. Military

Trump is losing support among the troops. That’s just one reason why the military risks getting sucked into the campaign.

U.S. President Donald Trump pauses during a press briefing at the White House, in Washington, DC on Aug. 19.

Why I, an Anti-Trump Republican, Didn’t Sign the Anti-Trump Letter

Many former Republican national security officials just endorsed Biden. They will be hobbled in the fight for the party’s post-Trump future.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware on July 28.

Why We Joined Over 70 Former Republican National Security Officials to Support Biden

A Trump empowered with a second term would be a threat to the United States, especially in Asia.

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas speaks at a UN Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters in New York on Feb. 26.

Don’t Let Iran Blow Up the U.N. Security Council

As a critical vote approaches, the fate of Iran nuclear sanctions—and decades of multilateralism—lies in the hands of Britain and France.

Headlines of the UAE-based The National and Gulf News newspapers reflect the agreement between the UAE and Israel to normalize relations, in Dubai on Aug. 14.

The Israel-UAE Deal Is Trump’s First Unambiguous Diplomatic Success

It’s a historic achievement that eluded other presidents. Trump will try to make the most of it.

Taiwanese sailors on the deck of a supply ship after taking part in military drills at the Tsoying naval base in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on Jan. 31, 2018.

Arm Taiwan—but Skip the Nukes

As the military balance of power shifts in China’s favor, Beijing may be increasingly tempted to act against Taiwan.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu points at a map of the Jordan Valley in Ramat Gan, on Sept. 10, 2019.

Europeans Pushing to Boycott Israel Over Annexation Should Think Twice

Calls for economic sanctions against Israel risk a costly collision with U.S. anti-boycott laws, as companies such as Airbnb can attest.

The U.S. Capitol at dusk in Washington on Feb. 6, 2018.

Congress Has Been AWOL on U.S. Coronavirus Diplomacy

The invisibility and silence of Congress is another reason for America’s shocking abdication of global leadership.

U.S. Army soldiers, part of the coalition against the Islamic State, at an air base northwest of Kirkuk, Iraq, before a planned pullout of U.S. forces, on March 29.

The Pentagon Tries to Pivot out of the Middle East—Again

Confusion over the removal of missiles and aircraft from Saudi Arabia could invite the aggression the United States is trying to avoid.

A Great Wall 236 submarine of the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the sea near Qingdao, China, on April 23, 2019.

Under Cover of Pandemic, China Steps Up Brinkmanship in South China Sea

Beijing has increased pressure on its nervous neighbors in its quest to dominate the entire South China Sea.

A young Iraqi protesting against corruption, unemployment, and failing public services in Baghdad, on Oct. 2, 2019.

The U.S.-Iraqi Relationship Is Coming to a Head—and That’s a Good Thing

After 17 years, there is little love left between Washington and Baghdad. Upcoming talks may be the last opportunity to save their dysfunctional partnership.

U.S. President Donald Trump (right) speaks alongside Vice President Mike Pence (left) and Navy Rear Adm. John Polowczyk during a press briefing in Washington on April 5.

6 Key Questions About the Trump Administration’s Firing of Captain Crozier

The affair surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak on the USS Theodore Roosevelt lays bare the dysfunction of civilian-military relations under Trump.

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