EXCERPT

A Boeing B-29 Superfortress flies over the National Mall during the Arsenal of Democracy, a World War II flyover for the 70th anniversary of V-E Day, in Washington on May 8, 2015.

Wall Street Was America’s First Foe in World War II

Breaking up monopolies was the first step in fighting Hitler.

A tent orphanage for Jewish refugees in Tehran, 1942.

When Iran Welcomed Jewish Refugees

In the middle of World War II, Tehran became a haven for both Jewish and Catholic Polish refugees who were welcomed as they arrived from Soviet Central Asia.

A refugee camp near Suruc in southern Turkey, across the border from Kobani in February 2016. Many Kurds fled Kobani and other areas of Syria in 2014 to escape the Islamic State. Now, with a new war launched by Turkey near their homes, people are fleeing again.

Turkey’s War in Syria Was Not Inevitable

U.S. strategy in Syria has long been plagued by short-term thinking, while Russia, Turkey, and Iran played a long game. Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds is just the latest chapter in Washington’s bungled approach to the region.

Far-right activists carrying German and Saxon flags and chanting "Wir sind das Volk" (We are the people) cast shadows as they gather to protest against a planned refugee center on Nov. 14, 2013 in Roetha, Germany.

Putting Our Own People First

Defining “us” and “them” is crucial for the success of far-right parties, and the boundaries are constantly shifting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping attends a meeting in Beijing on Aug. 29.

The Chinese Communist Party Wants It All

China's use of sharp power could shatter East Asia.

Indian workers use boats to remove sand in Allahabad on March 16, 2018.

The Coming Sand Wars

Battles over mining sand in India are only the beginning.

Moshe Reuven Azman, the chief rabbi of Ukraine and Kiev, walks inside a synagogue in central Kiev on Apr. 22.

Russian Disinformation Distorted Reality in Ukraine. Americans Should Take Note.

Putin’s propaganda portrayed Ukraine as a fascist state filled with anti-Semites. Despite Ukrainians’ election of a Jewish president, the image has stuck.

A man carries South Sudan's national flag at Mangateen Internal Displaced persons (IDPs) center during the visit of South Sudan's vice president in Juba on Nov. 17, 2018.

The Old Guard Are Killing the World’s Youngest Country

South Sudan was born amid great hope but has since descended into war. It will take a new generation of leaders to make it a successful state.

An old billboard displaying a U.S. flag stands on the United States’ side of the U.S.-Mexico border in California on April 3.

The Age of Nostalgia

Liberals shouldn’t leave emotion to the right-wing populists.

Jacob Zuma (right), the then-president of South Africa, and Ace Magashule, the then-premier of the Free State, ready to release white doves during the unveiling of the Nelson Mandela statue in Bloemfontein, South Africa, on Dec. 13, 2012.

The Man Who Stole South Africa

Cyril Ramaphosa has pledged a new dawn as president, but the secretary-general of his own party has built a web of corruption that thrives on darkness.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party gestures during a roadshow in support of the party's state assembly election party candidates in Varanasi on March 4. (Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)

Is India’s Modi a Reformer or a Performer?

In the world’s biggest democracy, good politics often have nothing to do with good economics.

Construction of the Faisal Mosque in the foothills of Margalla Hills of Islamabad, Pakistan, began in 1976 after a grant from Saudi King Faisal, whose name the mosque bears. (Muhammed Semih Ugurlu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Extremism Is Riyadh’s Top Export

Saudi Arabia is fighting for a dangerous monopoly on Islamic thought.

A U.S. Army military policeman stands guard in front of the stage as the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders perform for American forces in Baghdad as part of their military USO tour on Sept. 15, 2007. (John Moore/Getty Images)

From Doughnut Girls to Den Mothers and Cheerleaders

The U.S. military has long relied on women to entertain the troops. Here’s how that’s slowly changing.

Two Chechen fighters warm by the fire burning next to a house destroyed by Russian artillery in the center of Grozny, Jan. 15, 1995. ( Michael Evsafiev/AFP/Getty Images)

The Making of a Chechen Hitman

Russia’s best killers learned their skills fighting Moscow.

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