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Demonstrators take part in the People's Vote march calling for a referendum on a final Brexit deal in central London on Oct. 20. (Nikilas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images)

Referendum Redux?

Two years after deciding to leave the European Union, many Brits want a second vote on Brexit.

Iran is trying to maintain oil exports in the face of U.S. sanctions. An oil tanker off the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 2, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

Honduran migrants, heading in a caravan toward the United States, walk in Metapa, Mexico, on Oct. 22. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s System for Resettling Refugees Benefits the United States

By dismantling it, Trump would leave the country—and refugees—worse off.

Portraits of Saudi King Salman bin Abdulazziz and his son Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are seen on October 18, 2018 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Jamal Khashoggi Had Skin in the Game. The Crown Prince’s Cheerleaders Didn’t.

Too often, Westerners treat courageous local experts like pawns in a political game. The journalist’s murder should serve as a reminder that, for some, writing an op-ed is a deadly risk.

Afghan women wait in line to vote at a polling center for the country’s legislative election in Herat province on Oct. 20. (Hoshang Hashimi/AFP/Getty Images)

Afghanistan’s Strongman Democracy

Flawed and messy as it was, the vote was still good for democracy.

Members of the Cameroonian Gendarmerie patrol in Omar Bongo Square in Buea, Cameroon’s majority-Anglophone southwestern province’s capital, during a political rally for incumbent President Paul Biya on Oct. 3. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

Cameroon’s Paul Biya Gives a Master Class in Fake Democracy

One of the world’s most experienced autocrats has clinched another seven-year term by bending the rules of the game in his direction in ways both old and new.

A protester dressed as Saudi Arabian crown prince Mohammed bin Salman and another dressed as U.S. President Donald Trump demonstrate outside the White House in Washington on Oct. 19. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Saudi Khashoggi Claims Fall Flat; Riyadh Blindsided; Bolton in Moscow

Everything you need to know about Saudi Arabia’s claim that Khashoggi was killed during a fight inside its Istanbul consulate, the Trump administration’s decision to pull out of a major arms treaty, a new strategy for the war in Syria, and more.

Kandahar Police Chief Abdul Raziq poses during a graduation ceremony at a police training center in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on Feb. 19, 2017. (Jawed Tanveer/AFP/Getty Images)

The Taliban Just Won a Key Battle for Afghanistan’s Future

The killing of a strongman police chief creates a dangerous power vacuum.

A security official waits in front of the door of the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 17. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kingdom’s Hackers and Bots

Saudi Arabia is using cutting-edge technology to track dissidents and stifle dissent.

Geir Pedersen, right, then the U.N. special coordinator for Lebanon, and Michael Williams, the late U.N. troubleshooter, following a meeting with Lebanese Prime Minister Fuad Siniora in Beirut on Feb. 27, 2007. (Joseph Barrak/AFP/Getty Images)

Norwegian Diplomat Tops U.N. Shortlist For Syria Envoy

Geir Pedersen could be saddled with one of diplomacy’s most thankless tasks.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, left, shakes hands with South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo before their meeting in Seoul on June 28.

Few Signs of Progress on Denuclearization as U.S., South Korea Cancel Another Major Military Exercise

Current and former U.S. officials say North Korea is dragging its heels, but Seoul and Pyongyang are still talking.

(Joan Wong for Foreign Policy)

The Tourism Curse

Like a wealth of oil, lots of visitors can become a development trap. Here’s how to avoid it.

Far-right Brazilian presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro on Oct 11. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at the start of the second trilateral meeting with U.S. President Jimmy Carter at Camp David on Sept. 7, 1978. The talks led to the Camp David Accords.(Bettmann Archives via Getty Images)

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listens as State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert speaks to press at the State Department on May 29. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

State Department Considering Public Diplomacy Overhaul

The revamp comes as officials debate how to counter Russian and Chinese influence campaigns.

A truck transports a shipping container at a port in Zhangjiagang, China, on Aug. 7. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trade War Has Claimed Its First Victim

Tariffs from the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, and the EU may have damaged the WTO beyond repair.

Khoisan elders and activists prepare to honor the Khoisan activist Adam Mathysen at his grave on the outskirts of Johannesburg on April 27. (Nathan Siegel for Foreign Policy)

South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

As Pretoria prepares to confront the legacy of colonial and apartheid-era land theft, hardly anyone seems to care about the claims of the country’s earliest inhabitants—the Khoisan.

A Japanese soldier walks past amphibious assault vehicles during an amphibious landing exercise at the beach of the navy training center in Zambales province, north of Manila, as a part of a joint military exercise with the United States and the Philippines on Oct. 6. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images)

The Quad Is Not Enough

Trump has revived a four-way security dialogue among the United States, India, Australia, and Japan, but if it's going to make China pay attention, it will need some new members.

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Introducing First Person, Foreign Policy’s New Flagship Podcast

Weekly episodes will feature interviews with people who have participated in world events.

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