Dispatch

Marian Kotleba, the leader of the right nationalist People's Party-Our Slovakia, walks to his seat during the introduction of delegates to the parliament in Bratislava on March 11, 2016.

Marian Kotleba Wants to Make Slovakia Fascist Again

A party of right-wing extremists is trying to ride a wave of youth support to reshape Slovakia’s government.

Israeli children accompany their father during Israel's parliamentary election at a polling station in Rosh Haayin on Sept. 17, 2019.

Why Israel’s Political System Is Broken and How It Can Be Fixed

Do-over elections and political paralysis are undermining faith in the system.

A man wearing a protective face mask walks in a nearly empty shopping mall, a few minutes after rush hour, in Beijing on Feb. 24.

How Do You Keep China’s Economy Running With 750 Million in Quarantine?

The “demon virus” threat has rattled the confidence of many Chinese in the regime’s ability to protect people’s lives and jobs.

A Soldier assigned to the United Kingdom specialized infantry trains Nigerian forces on refined weapon-reloading techniques during Flintlock 20 near Thies, Senegal, Feb. 17, 2020. (U.S. photo by Sgt. Steven Lewis)

In West Africa, U.S. Military Struggles for Scarce Resources as Terrorism Threat Grows

Tensions with Iran almost scuttled a major international training exercise in the Sahel.

A woman wears a protective mask as she walks by Chinese flags  during the Lunar New Year and Spring Festival holiday in Beijing on Jan. 28.

How Virus Lockdown Orders Went From Xi Jinping to My Neighborhood Auntie

Virus quarantine measures have left hundreds of millions of people trapped indoors.

Asylum seekers evacuated from Libya gather at the Gashora Emergency Transit Center during a visit by permanent representatives of the African Union in Bugesera district, southeast of Rwanda's capital, Kigali, on Oct. 23, 2019.

Europe’s Harsh Border Policies Are Pushing Refugees All the Way to Rwanda

EU funds for Libyan militias forced thousands of migrants into dangerous Libyan detention centers. Now, after being evacuated, some of them are stuck as far away as Rwanda—with no idea if they will ever be resettled.

The Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai poses for a photograph at the all-boys Cadet College Swat in Gulibagh, near Mingora, Pakistan, on March 31, 2018.

Pakistan’s Success Story

How Swat Valley went from basket case to on the mend.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivers a speech at the Munich Security Conference on Feb. 15.

The U.S. and Europe Are Speaking a Different Language on China

Dire American warnings about the threat from Beijing fall on deaf ears at the Munich Security Conference.

Filipinos wearing face masks attend Sunday Mass at a church in Paranaque, Metro Manila, on Feb. 9.

Filipinos Turn on Duterte as Coronavirus Fears Spread

Anti-Chinese and anti-American conspiracy theories have followed the first death.

The now-demolished Camel Youth Hostel in Kashgar, Xinjiang

Xinjiang’s Hui Muslims Were Swept Into Camps Alongside Uighurs

Testimonies and eyewitness accounts suggest the mass incarceration of ethnic Hui in China’s northwest.

Palace guards wear medical masks in Bangkok on Feb. 4.

Tourists Dwindle as Thailand Readies for Coronavirus Threat

Billions of dollars are at stake as Bangkok walks the line between closing borders and angering Beijing.

Mohammad Masoom Stanekzai (left), Afghanistan's acting defense minister at the time, speaks during a joint press conference with then-Interior Minister Noor-ul-haq Ulomi in Kabul on Dec. 23, 2015.

Is Afghan Intelligence Building a Regime of Terror With the CIA’s Help?

As dissidents are attacked and murdered, critics liken the National Directorate of Security to the brutal intelligence service of the Afghan communists in the 1980s.

Eldred Davis protests the New England Clean Energy Connect corridor

Canada’s Not-So-Green Green Energy

Hydropower may be the future of Canadian power, but it won’t bring the environmental benefits many proponents tout.

Palestinian demonstrators burn portraits of U.S. President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest against Trump’s proposed peace plan in Gaza’s Jabalia refugee camp on Jan. 31.

Trump’s Peace Plan Is Palestinians’ Worst Nightmare

Arab states might accept Trump’s one-sided initiative, but an increasingly vocal new generation of Palestinians won’t allow regional leaders to sign away their right to a sovereign homeland.

Migrants in a detention center in Libya

Italy’s Failed Migration Fix Has Led to Chaos in Libya

Despite pushing policies that are politically naive and disastrous for human rights in North Africa, Italian politicians keep getting promoted in Brussels.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson hosts African leaders and senior government representatives during the UK-Africa Investment Summit in London on Jan.20.

Boris Johnson’s New Scramble for Africa

The prime minister’s vision of a “Global Britain” after Brexit will only succeed if he abandons imperial nostalgia in favor of practical investment in the continent’s fast-growing economies.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence speaks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the Fifth World Holocaust Forum in Jerusalem on Jan. 23.

For Netanyahu, Trump’s White House Is the Gift That Keeps on Giving

A U.S. peace plan seems designed mainly to get Bibi reelected. The Palestinians aren’t even invited.

Afghan men walk along the highway between the Turkish cities of Dogubayazit and Agri, in eastern Turkey, near the border with Iran on April 22, 2019. After crossing the border, they were unable to obtain proper documentation that would allow them to ride public transportation, forcing them to walk for hours or days as they travel toward Istanbul on their way to Europe.

As America Shuts Its Doors, Afghan Refugees Are Stuck in Turkey

The Trump administration has made it nearly impossible for Afghans who aided U.S. troops to claim asylum in the United States. Instead, thousands who aided Americans on the battlefield are stranded in a country that doesn't want them.

People demonstrate in Lima on Oct. 3, 2019, after President Martin Vizcarra dissolved Peru's unicameral parliament.

Peru’s Vote for a New Congress Could Shape the President’s Legacy

After suspending the country’s Congress last fall, new legislative elections could give Martín Vizcarra the support he needs to confront corruption—or lead to renewed political gridlock.

Protesters take part in a pro-independence march on Jan. 11 in Glasgow, Scotland.

A New Scottish Independence Vote Seems All but Inevitable

With increasing support from voters, the Scottish National Party is unlikely to give up its fight for a second referendum despite the procedural obstacles it faces.

A ship spewing heavy smoke is pictured on the Bosphorus in Istanbul on April 21, 2009.

In Turkey, a Battle Over Infrastructure Could Shape the Next Presidential Race

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s drive to build a new canal to bypass the Bosphorus faces a formidable opponent: Istanbul mayor and likely presidential contender Ekrem Imamoglu.

tessa-fox-northeast-syria-looting

Who Exactly Is Turkey Resettling in Syria?

Ankara claims it’s helping displaced Syrians return home. Kurds and international observers accuse Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government of demographic engineering.

The shuttered Israeli embassy  in Moscow on Oct. 30, during an Israeli foreign ministry strike.

Benjamin Netanyahu Is Bleeding Israel’s Foreign Ministry to Death

Deep funding cuts and the gutting of Israel’s diplomatic service is undermining the prime minister’s ambitious foreign-policy agenda.

Alyn Smith, Scottish National Party candidate for Stirling, meets with voters on the streets of Stirling on Nov. 19 ahead of the general election.

In Scotland’s Swing Seats, Nationalists Are Selling Voters on Independence

Mired in the unpopular Brexit process, the Tories will have to convince voters that the union is worth it to keep hotly contested seats.

Ali Milani, the British Labour Party's parliamentary candidate in Uxbridge and South Ruislip, speaks to campaign volunteers before canvassing in the Eastcote area of London on Dec. 7.

The Biggest Threat to Boris Johnson Isn’t Jeremy Corbyn

The British prime minister isn’t afraid of the Labour party’s leader. To retain his parliamentary seat in an increasingly diverse west London district, Johnson is facing a tight race to fend off Ali Milani, a 25-year-old immigrant from Iran.

Sudanese people celebrate in the streets of Khartoum on July 5 after ruling generals and protest leaders announced they reached an agreement on the disputed issue of a new governing body.

The Enemies of Sudan’s Democracy Are Lurking Everywhere

The country successfully toppled a dictator. Now it's in an epic battle to secure freedom.

A migrant walks among tents at the Vucjak camp on the outskirts of Bihac in Bosnia and Herzegovinia on  Nov. 20.

Croatia Is Abusing Migrants While the EU Turns a Blind Eye

The evidence of Croatian police violence toward migrants is overwhelming, but Brussels continues to praise and fund Zagreb for patrolling the European Union’s longest external land border.

Leoluca Orlandoconfers honorary citizenship on foreign students

Can Culture, Not Blood, Make You Italian?

A new generation of students raised and schooled in Italy are pushing to reform outdated citizenship laws that reward those with Italian bloodlines rather than people who have lived in the country all their lives.

A man faces a member of the Canadian police as he carries baggage as he crosses the U.S.-Canada border on Feb. 26, 2017, in  Champlain, New York.

Is Canada Violating Its Constitution by Sending Refugees Back to the United States?

A federal court case could stop Ottawa from treating the United States as a safe third country due to the Trump administration’s harsh policies toward asylum-seekers.

Moldovan President Igor Dodon

Moldova’s Failed Revolution Is Not Over Yet

Explaining every political crisis in a former Soviet country as a tug of war between East and West misses the point. The problem is a system of nepotism, patronage, and entrenched corruption.

Former Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu

Erdogan’s Attacks on His Old Ally Could Backfire

The Turkish president is shutting down a university to punish former Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu for leaving the AKP and starting a new party, but he risks alienating precisely the voters he claims to champion.

Protesters link arms to hold the line at a roadblock on the Ring Bridge in Beirut on Oct. 26.

To the Barricades in Beirut

Lebanese protesters are reappropriating roadblocks—long a mark of civil war-era division—as a symbol of unity.

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