Dispatch

Protesters chant and sing songs against French President Emmanuel Macron

A Besieged Macron Doubles Down on de Gaulle

To distract from runaway protests, the French president is making a show of independence on the world stage.

Soldiers of the Afghan National Army near Pul-e-Khumri, Baghlan province, Afghanistan

How Ordinary Afghans Are Living the ‘Afghanistan Papers’

The prospect of a revival of talks with the Taliban is persuading no one after two protracted civil wars that have taken up the lives of most Afghans.

Alyn Smith, Scottish National Party candidate for Stirling, meets with voters on the streets of Stirling on Nov. 19 ahead of the general election.

In Scotland’s Swing Seats, Nationalists Are Selling Voters on Independence

Mired in the unpopular Brexit process, the Tories will have to convince voters that the union is worth it to keep hotly contested seats.

Ali Milani, the British Labour Party's parliamentary candidate in Uxbridge and South Ruislip, speaks to campaign volunteers before canvassing in the Eastcote area of London on Dec. 7.

The Biggest Threat to Boris Johnson Isn’t Jeremy Corbyn

The British prime minister isn’t afraid of the Labour party’s leader. To retain his parliamentary seat in an increasingly diverse west London district, Johnson is facing a tight race to fend off Ali Milani, a 25-year-old immigrant from Iran.

Sudanese people celebrate in the streets of Khartoum on July 5 after ruling generals and protest leaders announced they reached an agreement on the disputed issue of a new governing body.

The Enemies of Sudan’s Democracy Are Lurking Everywhere

The country successfully toppled a dictator. Now it's in an epic battle to secure freedom.

A migrant walks among tents at the Vucjak camp on the outskirts of Bihac in Bosnia and Herzegovinia on  Nov. 20.

Croatia Is Abusing Migrants While the EU Turns a Blind Eye

The evidence of Croatian police violence toward migrants is overwhelming, but Brussels continues to praise and fund Zagreb for patrolling the European Union’s longest external land border.

Leoluca Orlandoconfers honorary citizenship on foreign students

Can Culture, Not Blood, Make You Italian?

A new generation of students raised and schooled in Italy are pushing to reform outdated citizenship laws that reward those with Italian bloodlines rather than people who have lived in the country all their lives.

A man faces a member of the Canadian police as he carries baggage as he crosses the U.S.-Canada border on Feb. 26, 2017, in  Champlain, New York.

Is Canada Violating Its Constitution by Sending Refugees Back to the United States?

A federal court case could stop Ottawa from treating the United States as a safe third country due to the Trump administration’s harsh policies toward asylum-seekers.

Turkish-backed Syrian Arab fighters man a checkpoint in the Kurdish-majority city of Afrin in northern Syria after seizing control of it from the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) on March 18, 2018.

The Fight for ISIS’s Old Territory Is Just Beginning

A host of forces including Turkish and Iranian proxies to Russian troops and Syrian government forces are jockeying for control of the lands that once were held by the Islamic State.

A Lebanese anti-government demonstrator waves a stick while confronting supporters of the Shiite groups Hezbollah and Amal in Beirut on Nov. 25.

Untouchable No More: Hezbollah’s Fading Reputation

As Hezbollah sides with Lebanon's political elite, protesters in Beirut are increasingly willing to criticize it.

Supporters of the Law and Justice party watch the announcement of the results of the Polish parliamentary elections on television screens in Warsaw on Oct. 13.

Poland’s State of the Media

How public television became an outlet for the Law and Justice party—and what it means for democracy.

A convoy of U.S. armored vehicles patrols the northeastern Syrian town of Qahtaniyah

No ‘End Date’ for U.S. Troops in Syria

Top general is confident he can keep pressure on the Islamic State, but a recent watchdog report says the group could reconstitute.

Demonstrators take cover as clashing with riot police during a protest against President Sebastian Piñera on November 19, 2019 in Santiago, Chile. (Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images)

From Model to Muddle: Chile’s Sad Slide Into Upheaval

Chile’s government has sought for years to fix inequality problems that date to free market reforms under Pinochet. It just wasn’t nearly enough.

Fatima Khode al-Shalla, 36, walks through her home in Malkef, Syria, on Nov. 6 as her family prepares to move to another village about 15 miles to the west to avoid the advancing war.

Life on the Front Lines in Northern Syria

With echoes of shelling from Turkish-allied forces nearby, families sheltering in abandoned villages wonder when they can go home.

Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, the commander of U.S. Central Command

Top U.S. General: It’s ‘Very Possible’ Iran Will Attack Again

The threat from Tehran continues to increase despite U.S. military buildup, U.S. Central Command’s Gen. Kenneth McKenzie says.

Moldovan President Igor Dodon

Moldova’s Failed Revolution Is Not Over Yet

Explaining every political crisis in a former Soviet country as a tug of war between East and West misses the point. The problem is a system of nepotism, patronage, and entrenched corruption.

People demonstrate under pouring rain in Bogotá on Nov. 21.

Colombia Joins Latin America’s Wave of Protests

After hundreds of thousands of anti-government demonstrators took to the streets, President Iván Duque’s administration faces calls to address a range of demands.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Back to the Wall, Netanyahu Fights for His Political Life

Even after a devastating indictment, it may be too soon to count out the Israeli prime minister known as “the magician.”

Former Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu

Erdogan’s Attacks on His Old Ally Could Backfire

The Turkish president is shutting down a university to punish former Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu for leaving the AKP and starting a new party, but he risks alienating precisely the voters he claims to champion.

Demonstrators march through Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 12.

Chile’s Protesters Have Won a Path to a New Constitution

Here’s why they want to replace the dictatorship-era document.

Protesters link arms to hold the line at a roadblock on the Ring Bridge in Beirut on Oct. 26.

To the Barricades in Beirut

Lebanese protesters are reappropriating roadblocks—long a mark of civil war-era division—as a symbol of unity.

A man waves an Indian flag near Chungking Mansions, a popular haunt among minority South Asians and Africans in Hong Kong, as police keep watch at a crosswalk during a pro-democracy rally in Tsim Sha Tsui district on Oct. 27.

Hong Kong’s Minorities Face Racism From Police and Protesters

Ethnic tensions are coming to the fore, but many minorities find solidarity with activists.

Left: Muhammad Naseer Sheikh covers the hole where an unexploded live shell is buried in Chakra, Indian-administered Kashmir, on Nov. 1. Right: The mortar fired from across the Line of Control hit the tin roof of Sheikh’s residence before getting buried in the ground near his house.

In the Line of Fire Along Kashmir’s Line of Control

Since India revoked Kashmiri autonomy in August, local villagers have been living in fear amid cross-border gunfire and unexploded shells.

Women chant slogans during the commemoration of the International Women's Day in Medellín, Colombia

Colombian Women Are Saying ‘Yes, We Can’

Colombia’s culture of machismo has created a backlash in the form of a new women’s political movement.

Members of the Azov movement protest in front of Ukraine’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Kyiv on Oct. 28 holding a banner that says "Defense of Ukraine Is Not Terrorism!"

U.S. Congress Accidentally Boosted Ukraine’s Far-Right

A member of Congress wrote to the State Department calling out Ukraine’s Azov movement as terrorists. It backfired.

A Russian military police armored personnel carrier drives past an equestrian statue of Bassel al-Assad, the late brother of President Bashar al-Assad, in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli on Oct. 24.

Russia Is the Only Winner in Syria

With Washington’s policy in chaos and Erdogan moving into Putin’s orbit, Moscow has come out on top.

Seyil Eldos with his three younger brothers on the outskirts of Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, on May 17. Eldos’s biological father died of a heart attack, and his mother married her husband’s younger brother, as is traditional. Eldos’s three brothers were born to the second marriage.

A Family Stranded by China’s Camps

Repression in Xinjiang leaves tens of thousands of children without parents.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 summit in Japan.

Xi Jinping Has Embraced Vladimir Putin—for Now

But the Russia-China flirtation may not last forever. As in the classic novel “Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” the Chinese can be calculating about alliances.

Ten-year-old Bilal Habibulla poses with his drawing of the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, Xinjiang, at his home in Istanbul on April 27. The Id Kah Mosque is a symbol for the Uighur culture.

The Capital of Xinjiang Is Now in Turkey

Ethnic cleansing of Uighurs in China has forced an exodus to Istanbul—and a desperate effort to keep their culture alive.

People stand in line to check their names on the final list of India's National Register of Citizens in a village some 40 miles from Guwahati, the largest city of the northeastern state of Assam, on Aug. 31.

All Are Stateless. Some Are Hopeless.

Hindus left stateless in Assam think Modi will save them. Muslims fear the worst.

A Kashmiri muslim throws back a can of tear gas shot by Indian police on Feb. 05, 2010 in Srinagar, Kashmir, India.

Inside Kashmir’s New Anti-Indian Resistance

Cut off from the outside world, Kashmiris are digging trenches, starting strikes, and preparing for a long fight ahead.

A man suspected of belonging to the Islamic State group, who spoke to journalists in French, leans on the back of a truck as he waits to be searched by members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces just after leaving the Islamic State's last holdout of Baghouz, in the eastern Syrian province of Deir Ezzor on March 4.

They Left to Join ISIS. Now Europe Is Leaving Their Citizens to Die in Iraq.

A Belgian fighter captured in Syria was transported to Iraq to face trial. He's now on death row.

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