Photo Essays

Foreign Policy illustration/Dan Kitwood/ Pier Marco Tacca/Wiktor Szymanowicz/Amer Ghazzal/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Brexit Births Boris

Our top reads on Boris Johnson's unlikely route to 10 Downing Street.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media during a meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington on July 22.

Trump Does an About-Face on Pakistan—and Blunders Into the Kashmir Dispute

The U.S. president is desperate to salvage peace talks with the Taliban, even if it means cozying up to Pakistan at the expense of America’s newest partner in the Indo-Pacific.

Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a speech during the Victory Day military parade at Red Square in Moscow on May 9, 2018.

Putin’s Not Ready to Call It Quits

From annexing Belarus to reforming the constitution, speculation about how the Russian president will stay in power is rife. The question is whether any of the gambits will work.

A man receives a vaccine against Ebola from a nurse outside the Afia Himbi Health Center in Goma on July 15.

The World Bank Has the Money to Fight Ebola but Won’t Use It

In Congo, thousands of people have died due to a misguided finance-driven approach to fighting pandemics that puts investors before victims.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein listen to testimony during a committee hearing on the Foreign Agents Registration Act on July 26, 2017.

The Foreign Agents Registration Act Is Broken

Stepping up enforcement of FARA before reforming the act is a recipe for disaster.

A member of the U.S. military visits Section 60 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, on May 24. Section 60 is the final resting place for U.S. soldiers killed in the United States' most recent wars, especially Iraq and Afghanistan.

Restraint Isn’t Isolationism—and It Won’t Endanger America

Critics of offshore balancing claim a more restrained U.S. foreign policy will breed insecurity. They’re wrong, and their arguments are easily debunked.

Albanian opposition supporters wave their national flag and a U.S. flag during a protest demanding the resignation of the Albanian prime minister outside the government building in Tirana on Feb. 16.

The Trump Administration Is Helping Kill Albania’s Democracy

The State Department’s latest intervention in a European election served nobody’s interests at all.

A health worker waits to handle an unconfirmed Ebola patient at a newly built, Médecins Sans Frontières-supported Ebola treatment center in Bunia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Nov. 7, 2018.

In Fragile States, Disease Outbreaks Don’t Stay Local for Long

U.S. health aid can also promote stability, mitigate extremism, and avoid costly longer-term military interventions.

Pakistani residents read newspapers with coverage of Donald Trump's victory in the U.S. presidential election in Islamabad on Nov. 10, 2016.

Trump’s Hard Line on Pakistan Is All Bluster

U.S. needs in Afghanistan have overridden promises to get tough on Islamabad.

Turkmen President Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov presents a Alabai shepherd dog to his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, during a meeting in Sochi, Russia, on Oct. 11, 2017.

Weekend at Berdi’s

The president of Turkmenistan is probably alive. But as with so much else in the country, it’s hard to tell.

A investor monitors stock prices at a securities company in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on October 18, 2018.

The United States Is Going After China’s Banks

Using the financial 'death penalty' may be dangerous overreach.

Pakistani soldiers stand next to what Pakistan says is the wreckage of an Indian fighter jet shot down in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir near the Line of Control on Feb. 27.

Our Top Stories of 2019—So Far

From a trade war with China to women’s rights around the world, here’s what has captured our readers’ attention in the first half of the year.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands at the G20 Summit in Osaka on June 29.

The World This Weekend

Japan and South Korea continue a historic dispute while Turkey exits the F-35 program amid tensions with the United States.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

A wind farm in Jacobsdorf, Germany, on Feb. 27. PATRICK PLEUL/AFP/Getty Images

Climate Change Requires Big Solutions. But Baby Steps Are the Only Way to Go.

Dramatic projects to mitigate global warming often don’t work. Slow, quiet, incremental policies are the planet’s best hope.

Greta Thunberg attends the Youth for Climate march in Brussels on Feb. 21.  Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Who Will Save the Planet?

Meet five unlikely saviors of Earth's climate crisis.

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