Podcast

White supremacists demonstrate on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 11, 2017. (Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

He Didn’t Know the Klan Handshake. It Almost Cost Him His Life.

On our podcast: Journalist Vegas Tenold describes the six years he spent with white supremacists.

A man withdraws Iranian rials from an ATM in Tehran on July 31. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Ordinary Iranians Will Suffer, but Regime Insiders Will Profit

On our podcast: Journalist Jason Rezaian recalls life in Iran under sanctions.

U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a signed presidential memorandum aimed at what he calls Chinese economic aggression at the White House on March 22. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Smoot-Hawley

On the podcast: The United States’ last big trade war was in 1930. It did not end well.

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem on June 28. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

‘It Could Have Led to a Nuclear War in the Middle East’

On the podcast: When Israeli extremists plotted to blow up the Dome of the Rock.

Masih Alinejad outside her home in New York in May. (Jesse Dittmar for Foreign Policy)

The Woman Who Defied Iran

On the podcast: Masih Alinejad took off her headscarf and started a movement.

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C. in December 1987. (AFP/Getty Images)

When Ronnie Met Mikhail​

On our podcast: As Trump sits down with Putin, we look back at a summit in Reykjavik that helped end the Cold War.

Peruvian players huddle prior before the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between Australia and Peru at Fisht Stadium on June 26 in Sochi, Russia. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

Peru’s National Identity Was Bound Up With Conflict and Corruption for Decades — Then It Qualified for the World Cup.

On our podcast, how a country scores two goals in the soccer tournament and finds redemption.

A migrant child looks out the window of a bus as protesters try to block a bus carrying migrant children out of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection Detention Center on June 23 in McAllen, Texas.  (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

They Took the Children for a Bath and Never Brought Them Back

On our podcast: An immigration lawyer tells harrowing stories of asylum-seekers at the southern U.S. border.

Gina Haspel is sworn in during her confirmation hearing to become CIA director in Washington, D.C., on May 9. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

He Feared the CIA Would Delete a Document Detailing Its Torture Program. So He Took It.

On our podcast: A Senate investigator who exposed the agency’s torture secrets tells his story.

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Stalin Falsified the Data, Then Killed the Statisticians

How the Soviet Union facilitated the famine of the 1930s that killed millions of Ukrainians, then buried the evidence.

TOPSHOT - People watch a television news screen showing file footage of a North Korean missile launch, at a railway station in Seoul on August 29, 2017.
Nuclear-armed North Korea fired a ballistic missile over Japan and into the Pacific Ocean on August 29 in a major escalation by Pyongyang amid tensions over its weapons ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

This American Visited North Korea’s Most Sensitive Nuke Sites. What He Saw Blew His Mind.

North Koreans wanted the renowned scientist Siegfried Hecker to know they could hide their bomb material and the United States would never find it.

Rohingya refugees in Balukhali camp on January 13, 2018 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Rohingyas Were Shot, Hacked With Machetes, and Then They Made for the Border

Relief worker Pavlos Kolovos watched as one of the world’s worst refugee crises unfolded in real time.

Participants hold laptops at the Chaos Computer Club's annual congress in Hamburg, Germany, in December 2012. (Patrick Lux/Getty Images)

Why Was a Private Israeli Intel Firm Digging Up Dirt on This Former Obama Administration Official?

Colin Kahl was targeted by Black Cube, the same company Harvey Weinstein hired to discredit his accusers.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Panmunjom, South Korea, on April 27. (Korea Summit Press Pool/AFP/Getty Images)

How to Haggle With a Dictator

Bill Richardson has made eight missions to North Korea to negotiate the release of American captives. He sat down with Foreign Policy to explain how it’s done.

The Israeli flag flies in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem on Dec. 1, 2017. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

The Untold Story of the Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995

The weekly podcast: How a U.S. presidential candidate found common cause with Israelis opposed to the peace process to pass a law that could now doom it.

A South Korean soldier walks past a television displaying images of U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a railway station in Seoul on March 9. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

The Road Ahead With North Korea

The weekly podcast: What a potential summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un could look like.

Foto, Michael Melo

Reporter’s Notebook: Brazil’s Forgotten Children and Russia’s #MeToo Problem

FP’s April magazine: “The End of Human Rights” tackled issues from the Amazon to Vladivostok. On today’s E.R. episode, we talk to two contributors.

A Syrian man looks at a building fire following regime bombardment in Douma, one of the few remaining rebel-held pockets in Eastern Ghouta, on the outskirts of Damascus on March 23. (Hamza al-Ajweh/AFP/Getty Images)

What Comes Next in Syria?

With President Trump’s strikes on Assad’s regime, the Syrian civil war is at the forefront of the global political stage. But what happens when the strikes are over?

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Reporter’s Notebook: Germany’s Family Reunification Problem

FP contributor Vauhini Vara appears on The E.R. to discuss her story “Germany’s Family Feud.”

China's President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the opening session of the Chinese Communist Party's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Oct. 18.  (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

How Far Will China Go?

From buying influence at American universities to forcing Chinese nationals to return home, Beijing is expanding its political operations abroad.

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