Podcast

Chef José Andrés stirs paella in a giant pan during the #ChefsForPuertoRico relief operation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October 2017. (World Central Kitchen)

Paellas for the People

On the podcast: How chef José Andrés feeds the needy around the world.

Afghan Taliban militants and residents stand on an armored vehicle of the Afghan National Army as they celebrate a ceasefire in Maiwand district of Kandahar province on June 17, 2018. (Javed Tanveer/AFP/Getty Images)

How the Taliban Won

On the podcast: Former Pakistani Ambassador Husain Haqqani on America’s endgame in Afghanistan.

People raise their hands during a mass opposition rally against President Nicolás Maduro, during which Juan Guaidó declared himself Venezuela's acting president, in Caracas on Jan. 23. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuela Unraveled

On the Podcast: A human rights activist describes life under Maduro.

The Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington on Jan. 8 before a hearing for his lawsuit against the government of Iran. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

An American Captive in Iran

On the podcast: The Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian recounts his grueling 18 months in an Iranian prison.

Protesters demonstrating against the right-wing government of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban hold a rally in Budapest, Hungary, on April 14, 2018. Demonstrators demanded a free press and independent public media and new laws to ensure fair elections. (Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images)

Budapest Blues

On the podcast: What it’s like to be a journalist in Orban’s Hungary.

Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe speaks at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas, on April 3, 2012. (Nellie Doneva/Abilene Reporter-News via AP)

Climate Change Prophet

On the podcast: A scientist who is also an evangelical Christian wants conservatives to understand the dangers of climate change.

(Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)

The China Syndrome

On the podcast: A former CIA analyst on Beijing’s interference in the affairs of other countries.

U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a signed presidential memorandum aimed at what he calls Chinese economic aggression at the White House on March 22. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Why Economists Hate Tariffs

On the podcast: How the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930 embroiled the U.S. in a trade war and prolonged the Great Depression.

Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Are Brazilians Ready for Bolsonaro?

On the podcast: The era of the strongman returns to Brazil.

A man protests against Brexit outside the Houses of Parliament in London on July 5. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The Brexit Rubik’s Cube

On the podcast: Inside the British campaign for a second vote on leaving Europe.

War correspondent Marie Colvin in Peeblesshire, Scotland, on Aug. 20, 2011. (Writer Pictures via AP Images)

Shot in Sri Lanka, Shelled in Syria

On the podcast: War correspondent Marie Colvin documented the horrors of war until one of them took her life.

Wind mills of the National Power and Light Company in Santa Ana, Costa Rica, on Oct. 23, 2015. (Ezequiel Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)

Costa Rica’s War on Climate Change

On the podcast: How a tiny Central American country became a leader in reducing carbon emissions.

A demonstrator attends a protest to denounce China's treatment of ethnic Uighur Muslims in front of the Chinese consulate in Istanbul on July 5. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Inside China’s Re-education Camps

On the podcast: A Uighur journalist describes the plight of her relatives interned in Xinjiang. 

Cumhuriyet editor in chief Can Dundar speaks to media as he arrives at a courthouse for trial in Istanbul on April 1, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

‘To Be a Journalist in Turkey Means You’re Ready to Sacrifice Everything’

On the podcast: the price one Turkish newspaper editor is paying for angering President Erdogan.

Benjamin Ferencz, a former chief prosecutor at the Nuremberg trials, at his home in Delray Beach, Florida, on March 10, 2016. (Brooks Kraft/Getty Images)

‘How Do You Balance a Million People Murdered Against 22 Defendants?’

On the podcast: The last living Nuremberg prosecutor describes the Allied trials against Nazi leaders.

A 10-year-old Yemeni boy, Ghazi Ali bin Ali, who suffers from severe malnutrition, rests on a bed at a hospital in Jabal Habashi on the outskirts of Taiz on Oct. 30. (Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

Not Just Bombs but Economic Warfare

On the podcast: How a Saudi-led campaign has starved Yemen’s children.

Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Flirting With Fascism

On the podcast: How Brazilians grew tired of democracy and rallied around a strongman.

FirstPerson_explain_article

Introducing First Person, Foreign Policy’s New Flagship Podcast

Weekly episodes will feature interviews with people who have participated in world events.

Manal al-Sharif reads from her book, Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman's Awakening, in Munich on Oct. 8, 2017. (Andreas Gebert/picture alliance via Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

‘They Took Them Quietly. All of Them Are in Jail Today.’

On the podcast: A woman who challenged the Saudi regime by getting behind the wheel of a car speaks out.

Wendy Sherman, the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs, sits next to (from left) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Robert Malley from the U.S. National Security Council, and European Union representative Helga Schmid during a negotiation session with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif over Iran's nuclear program in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

In Negotiations With Iran, ‘There’s Always One More Thing’

On the podcast: Wendy Sherman recounts the grueling path to the Iran nuclear deal.

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