Review

A protester holds a Trump flag inside the U.S. Capitol building near the Senate chamber in Washington on Jan. 6.

The Founding Fathers Didn’t See This Coming

The U.S. Constitution is breaking down in ways that its designers recognized from history—and thought they had guarded against.

Military guests in Beijing

China Is Both Weak and Dangerous

“The China Nightmare” lays out the risks of a surprisingly fragile state.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden

Why Liberal Internationalism Is Still Indispensable—and Fixable

G. John Ikenberry’s new book traces what went wrong. And Biden is listening.

Pakistani laborers work on a building in Lahore on Jan. 21, 2014.

Pakistan Has Its Problems, but It Won’t Perish

A new book offers riveting and memorable reporting, though it falls back on outdated narratives of a country that has moved on.

African infantrymen of the French Army in 1915

In the Trenches With the Colonizer

The French Senegalese writer David Diop revises the modernist archetype with a protagonist long excluded from World War I literature: the African soldier on the front lines.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and then-U.S. President Barack Obama

In Memoir, Obama Calls Putin a ‘Ward Boss, Except With Nukes’

The former U.S. president frankly assesses foreign leaders he met—and many fail to earn his esteem.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi looks at sculptures of the terra-cotta army in China’s Shaanxi province on May 14, 2015.

What Is India’s Foreign-Policy Vision?

S. Jaishankar’s “The India Way” is a rare book by a sitting foreign minister.

A masked tourist looks out over New York City from the Edge sky deck  as it reopens to the public amid the coronavirus pandemic on Sept. 2.

Moving Beyond a Post-Pandemic World

In a new book, Fareed Zakaria draws some hard but unavoidable conclusions about dealing with future viruses.

John F. Kennedy feeds the pigeons at the Piazza San Marco in Venice circa 1937.

The 4 False Deathbeds of John F. Kennedy

The 35th president grew up wealthy, privileged, callow—and extremely sensitive to the weakness of others.

Niv Sultan in Tehran.

Israeli TV Spy Thriller ‘Tehran’ Flouts Stereotypes About Iran

Apple TV+ premieres series by the director of “Homeland” that captivated Israelis this summer.

Indian author Pankaj Mishra in 2006.

You Can Only See Liberalism From the Bottom

Why Pankaj Mishra sees the ideology’s limits more clearly than its most powerful fans.

ForeignPolicy__Caste2

Feeling Like an Outcast

The bestselling book “Caste” brilliantly frames racial hierarchies in the United States but largely ignores the horrors of India’s caste structure.

A promotional photo from the Turkish TV show Dirilis: Ertugrul.

How Turkey’s Soft Power Conquered Pakistan

The TV drama “Ertugrul” reveals how neo-Ottoman fantasies are finding an enthusiastic audience in a country that struggles with Saudi and Western influence.

Protesters march on the street chanting and carrying anti-China slogans on Nov. 20, 2018 in Makati, Philippines.

Southeast Asia is Ground Zero in the New U.S.-China Conflict—and Beijing Is Winning

‘Under Beijing’s Shadow’ lays out in compelling detail how China is working to dominate the region.

Imogen Kogge as Angela Merkel in Die Getriebenen. Volker Roloff/​carte blanche/​rbb

The Refugee Crisis Is Now a German Superhero Movie

The most persuasive portrait of Angela Merkel’s decision-making five years ago is featured in a new television film.

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