Review

Eliot Higgins, the founder and executive director of Bellingcat, speaks during the world’s biggest tech festival, Campus Party, in Utrecht, the Netherlands, on May 27, 2016.

The Mice Who Caught the Cat—and Rattled the Kremlin

“We Are Bellingcat” charts the rise of the digital sleuths who have used open-source investigations to foil Russia’s intelligence agencies.

Policemen inspect the facilities at a coal mine in Changji in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Feb. 21.

Meet Today’s Masters of the Universe

“The World for Sale” peels back the cover on the secretive—and sometimes shady—people who make the modern world go around.

A photo from the film Quo Vadis, Aida?

Oscar-Shortlisted Film Puts Bosnian Genocide on Silver Screen

“Quo Vadis, Aida?” could do for the Srebrenica massacre what “Schindler’s List” accomplished for the Holocaust.

From left: Reporter Kate Webb in 1968; reporter Frances Fitzgerald on May 1, 1973; and photographer Catherine Leroy about to jump with the 173rd Airborne during
Operation Junction City in South Vietnam on Feb. 22, 1967.
Bettmann Archive/Getty Images/Bob Cole/Catherine Leroy Fund

How 3 Women Broke Into the Uber-Macho World of War Reporting

“You Don’t Belong Here” tells the story of three trailblazers who cleared the way for generations of female journalists after them.

The U.S. Marine Corp’s Iwo Jima Memorial can be seen as sun begins to rise behind the U.S. Capitol and Washington Monument in Arlington, Virginia on Nov. 7, 2020.

A World Without War

A new book argues that America’s massive military is predicated on imaginary threats—and we’d all be better off without it.

Omar Roman and Michelle Chinos hang a poster in their search for family member Homero Roman Gómez in Brooks County, Texas.

The Rolling Tragedy of ‘Missing in Brooks County’

A new documentary reveals the human cost of a decadeslong deterrence policy at the southern U.S. border. Will President Biden do anything about it?

Members of the Kurdish Women's Protection Units arrive on the front lines in the eastern outskirts of Raqqa on July 18, 2017.

The Women Who Helped Topple the Caliphate

“The Daughters of Kobani” chronicles the female Kurdish fighters who battled terrorists, fought for equality, and then got stabbed in the back.

María Mercedes Coroy in Jayro Bustamante's "La Llorona"

The Dictator’s Ghost

Horror has always been political. In Jayro Bustamante’s “La Llorona,” the long shadow of genocide haunts the house.

The Charging Bull Statue is covered by snow in Lower Manhattan during a winter storm on Feb. 1, 2021 in New York City.

Social Welfare Is as American as Apple Pie

Mike Konczal’s ‘Freedom From the Market’ resurrects a lost U.S. tradition.

U.S. President Barack Obama meets in the Situation Room with his national security advisors to discuss strategy in Syria of the White House Aug. 31, 2013 in Washington.

Foreign-Policy Pragmatism Is Back. So Are Its Flaws.

A new book by a Biden administration official puts a spotlight on the wisdom—and limits—of diplomatic competence.

A protester holds a Trump flag inside the U.S. Capitol building near the Senate chamber in Washington on Jan. 6.

The Founding Fathers Didn’t See This Coming

The U.S. Constitution is breaking down in ways that its designers recognized from history—and thought they had guarded against.

Military guests in Beijing

China Is Both Weak and Dangerous

“The China Nightmare” lays out the risks of a surprisingly fragile state.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden

Why Liberal Internationalism Is Still Indispensable—and Fixable

G. John Ikenberry’s new book traces what went wrong. And Biden is listening.

Pakistani laborers work on a building in Lahore on Jan. 21, 2014.

Pakistan Has Its Problems, but It Won’t Perish

A new book offers riveting and memorable reporting, though it falls back on outdated narratives of a country that has moved on.

African infantrymen of the French Army in 1915

In the Trenches With the Colonizer

The French Senegalese writer David Diop revises the modernist archetype with a protagonist long excluded from World War I literature: the African soldier on the front lines.

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