Africa

Khoisan elders and activists prepare to honor the Khoisan activist Adam Mathysen at his grave on the outskirts of Johannesburg on April 27. (Nathan Siegel for Foreign Policy)

South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

As Pretoria prepares to confront the legacy of colonial and apartheid-era land theft, hardly anyone seems to care about the claims of the country’s earliest inhabitants—the Khoisan.

Three Congolese ride a motorbike and carry a cross for a grave in Mangina, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 23. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the First War Zone Ebola Crisis

The world thought it knew how to deal with Ebola outbreaks—but it’s never dealt with one like this before.

Ships in the Port Louis harbor in Mauritius on Dec. 25, 2015. (T. Vale/Getty Images)

African Governments Are Paying for the World Bank’s Mauritius Miracle

Ghost offices on the small island provide legal but questionable means of siphoning tax dollars away from poor countries and into the pockets of the global elite.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks in Beijing on May 14, 2017. (Damir Sagolj/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Reaches for Checkbook Diplomacy to Counter China

Washington ramps up development finance to offer countries an alternative to Beijing’s deep pockets.

South Sudanese await the arrival of South Sudan's president, Salva Kiir, in Juba after peace talks in Ethiopia on June 22. (Akuot Chol/AFP/Getty Images)

Remember South Sudan? Washington Would Prefer Not to

Its freedom fighters have turned into brutal oppressors, and it is near to becoming another failed state, despondent U.S. supporters say.

Rescue workers carry a body on Aug. 9, 1998, in the aftermath of a bombing two days earlier that targeted the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. (AFP/Getty Images)

A Story of Leadership and Fatal Missed Opportunity

A review of Prudence Bushnell’s new book on the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings.

A South African student waits for the arrival of South African President Jacob Zuma for a speech at Tsinghua University in Beijing on Dec. 5, 2014. (Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images)

Forget Stanford, Tsinghua Beckons

America is losing African and Asian students to China.

Medical staff check each other's protective suits before entering the isolation unit at a hospital in Bundibugyo, western Uganda, during a suspected case of Ebola. Aug. 17. (Sumy Sadurni /AFP/Getty Images)

The Next Pandemic Will Be Arriving Shortly

Deadly diseases like Ebola and the avian flu are only one flight away. The U.S. government must start taking preparedness seriously.

South African President  Cyril Ramaphosa addresses the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 25.

‘Where There Has Been Wrongdoing There Will Be Accountability’

South Africa’s president tells Foreign Policy about his plans to tackle corruption, redistribute land, and restore the country’s moral leadership.

Rescuers work among the rubble after the bombing U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya on Aug. 7, 1998. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Bombings the World Forgot 

On the podcast: Ambassador Prudence Bushnell survived the 1998 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. Now she tells her story.

Soldiers of the 21st Motorized Infantry Brigade patrol in the streets of Buea, Cameroon on April 26, 2018.

The United States Can Stop Cameroon’s Brutal Crackdown

Washington must not ignore atrocities against the country’s Anglophones. It should use existing U.S. laws to force an end to the violence.

The managing editor of China Central Television Africa, Pang Xinhua, shows a local journalist in Nairobi how the organization has expanded in different parts of Africa on June 12, 2012. (Simon Maina/AFP/GettyImages)

China Is Buying African Media’s Silence

I wrote about Chinese oppression in a South African paper. Hours later, they cancelled my column.

Djiboutians hold a Chinese flag before the launch ceremony of a Chinese-funded construction project in Djibouti, on July 4, 2018. (YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Corruption Is Wasting Chinese Money in Africa

Beijing’s funding could do tremendous good—if Africans fight for their own real interests.

A French soldier involved in the regional anti-insurgent Operation Barkhane stands guard next to a Reaper drone at the French military air base in Niamey, Niger, on March 14, 2016. (Pascal Guyot/AFP/Getty Images)

Shadowy U.S. Drone War in Africa Set to Expand

Deployment of armed drones in Niger coincides with a new U.S. plan to withdraw some troops.

Seneglese and Chinese workers at the construction site for a new national theater in Dakar on Feb. 14, 2009. (Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese Aid and Investment Are Good for Africa

Increased interest in the continent’s real estate and resources will enhance the bargaining power of governments there—but they need to bargain for the right things.

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