Africa

A man prays at the burial of a friend on January 16, 2018 in Nairobi, Kenya after al-Shabab militants stormed the Dusit hotel complex.

Al-Shabab Wants You To Know It’s Alive and Well

The brutal attack in Kenya is designed to show Washington and the world that the terrorist group is still a force to be reckoned with in East Africa.

A police officer removes tires set by protesters during a demonstration in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Jan. 14. (Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images)

Zimbabwe Crackdown Saps Hopes of Reform

The violence is a blow to Zimbabweans who hoped for greater freedom of expression in the post-Mugabe era.

A participant holds a banner with photos of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban in front of the presidential palace during a demonstration on Dec. 21, 2018.

Defenders of Human Rights Are Making a Comeback

With larger powers in retreat, small countries and civil society groups have stepped up—and they have won some significant victories.

A member of the medical staff of the Ebola Treatment Unit at the Bwera General Hospital in western Uganda on Dec. 12, 2018. (Isaac Kasmani/AFP/Getty Images)

Ebola Has Gotten So Bad, It’s Normal

Africa isn’t just dealing with an outbreak anymore—and that’s bad news for everyone.

People gather to celebrate the return of the formerly banned anti-government group the Oromo Liberation Front at Mesquel Square in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Sept. 15, 2018.

Don’t Let Ethiopia Become the Next Yugoslavia

Federations of ethnonational states can become explosive during moments of political liberalization. Abiy Ahmed must tread carefully to avoid a Balkan nightmare.

Demonstrators during a march commemorating victims of Gambia's former regime, in Serekunda, on April 10, 2017.

Truth First, Reconciliation Later

After decades of dictatorship, Gambia has launched a truth commission. But in a country where some victims were also perpetrators, delivering justice to all won’t be easy.

President Omar al-Bashir appears at a rally with his supporters in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is the Uprising Sudan’s Genocidal Dictator Always Feared

The country’s current protests include all sections of society—and may soon topple Omar al-Bashir’s entire regime.

Opposition candidates Felix Tshisekedi (right), Martin Fayulu (second from right), and the head of the African Union Election Observation Mission, former interim Malian President Dioncounda Traoré (second from left), leave after a joint meeting on Jan. 2 in Kinshasa. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

African Leaders Must Act to Stop Electoral Fraud in Congo

South Africa and Angola have influence. They must use it to ensure that the Congolese government respects the will of voters.

Potential U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Webb, pictured here in his first year as a U.S. senator, takes questions during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 18, 2007. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Why Jim Webb Might Be Trump’s Ideal Secretary of Defense

His many controversial comments often align with the president’s views.

Zain (Zain Al Rafeea), right, cares for Rahil’s son, Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole), after 
Rahil is detained in Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum. (Fares Sokhon/Sony Pictures Classics)

Broke in Beirut

In Capernaum, Nadine Labaki finds a new way for film to deal with poverty.

(Musonda Kabwe for Foreign Policy)

Street Smart

Why South Africa’s formerly segregated townships are still central to its imagination.

Turkish-backed Syrian fighters train in a camp in the Aleppo countryside, northern Syria, on Dec. 16. (Aref Tammawi/AFP/Getty Images)

10 Conflicts to Watch in 2019

As U.S. leadership fades, authoritarian leaders are competing to see how much they can get away with.

The scene on the main road of Nawa-i-Barakzai district center in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Aug. 2. The Taliban held the area from October 2016 to July 2017.

This Year’s Essential Deep Dives

Five Reads: The best Foreign Policy long-form stories in 2018.

Michée Yolona Selenga of the Independent National Electoral Commission tests an electronic voting machine during a voter information session in Mbenzale near Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 21. (Holly Pickett for Foreign Policy)

Congo Wanted an Election. This Isn’t What It Meant.

The country will vote for a new government, and then brace for a violent aftermath.

Zaida Catalán at work with U.N. colleague Michael Sharp. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Morseby)

U.N. Report Links Congolese Government to Murder of American and Swede

Suspect’s death in prison suggests authorities might be suppressing evidence.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.