Analysis

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Here’s How the 2020 U.S. Elections Resemble Those of Fragile Democracies

A veteran observer of elections in troubled countries describes the undeniable parallels.

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The Game That Ruins Friendships and Shapes Careers

For me, Diplomacy is an addictive quarantine hobby. For my high school frenemy, it was training for the Trump administration.

Early voters line up outside of the Vienna Community Building to cast their ballots for the Nov. 3 election, in Vienna, West Virginia, on Oct. 21, 2020.

There’s Still Time (Barely) for America to Have a Free and Fair Election

Some hard-won active advice for staging a national vote during a pandemic.

The South Korean Navy Aegis destroyer King Sejong the Great sails during a drill on the Dokdo/Takeshima islets on Aug. 25, 2019.

Trump, Not Biden, Wrecked American Power in the Pacific

The damage done to U.S. standing in Asia will take decades to repair.

In this photo illustration, a mobile phone displays the logos for the Chinese apps WeChat and TikTok in front of a monitor showing the flags of the United States and China in Beijing on Sept. 22.

The Era of Full-Spectrum War Is Here

China won round one, and round two went to Russia. Can the United States and its allies take the third?

An Agni-III nuclear-capable missile is paraded on Republic Day in New Delhi on Jan. 26, 2009.

Is India Overturning Decades of Nuclear Doctrine?

The country has good reason to want first-strike capabilities. But the actual state of its arsenal suggests that it won’t get them.

Tibetan flags are displayed as protesters gather in front of the Consulate General of China in Los Angeles on March 10, 2019, to mark the 60th Global Tibetan National Uprising Commemorations.

Beijing’s Human Rights Victims Shouldn’t Support Trump

Tough on China or not, a second term would only spell more misery for Tibetans and other communities victimized by Beijing.

U.S. President Donald Trump, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, and moderator Kristen Welker participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22.

Campaign Debates Are Democracy Theater

A once-meaningful event has been hollowed out. Here’s how to fix it.

Supporters of newly appointed Prime Minister Sadyr Japarov wave Kyrgyz flags during a rally in support of Japarov in Bishkek on Oct. 14.

Kyrgyzstan’s Protests Won’t Keep Corrupt Criminals Out of Politics

Members of the criminal underworld have long turned to politics to avoid prosecution. Ousting one set of corrupt leaders in favor of another won’t end the country’s crisis.

U.S. President Donald Trump kisses German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the annual G7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Aug. 25, 2019.

What Would a Less Europhobic Trump Look Like—if He Wins?

Transatlantic relations are at a low point. But there are reasons why even Trump might want to mend them.

An Islamic State billboard is seen destroyed in the middle of the road in Qaraqosh, Iraq, on Nov. 8, 2016.

Foreign Fighters’ Life After the Caliphate

In interviews with former Islamic State members in hiding, religious concerns have been replaced with more quotidian worries.

U.S. forces patrol the area of the town of Tel Tamer, in Syria's northeastern Hasakah province on Aug. 17.

The United States Can Counter Putin and Assad With a Light Footprint in Syria

Washington can reduce Moscow’s influence and support Kurdish allies without a large troop presence in the region.

South African police officers hold protesters back during the funeral procession for Nathaniel Julies—who was shot by police—in Eldorado Park, near Johannesburg, on Sept. 5.

In South Africa, Police Violence Isn’t Black and White

The killing of a coloured teenager in Johannesburg exposed the fraught state of race relations in South Africa—and how the racial hierarchies created by apartheid continue to plague the country.

oe Biden walks to a meeting of bipartisan members of Congress to begin work on a legislative framework for comprehensive deficit reduction at Blair House, across the street from the White House in Washington on May 5, 2011.

The Realist Case for the Non-Realist Biden

Trump's foreign-policy instincts might be more sound—but he has forfeited the chance to lead.

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