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Crises Only Sometimes Lead to Change. Here’s Why.

The coronavirus pandemic won’t automatically lead to reforms. Great upheavals only bring systemic change when reformers have a plan—and the power to implement it.

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Margrethe Vestager Is Still Coming for Big Tech

The coronavirus pandemic has made the world more reliant on technology. The EU’s competition commissioner says that makes her fight more urgent.

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Welcome to the Post-Leader World

The United States has abdicated its dominant role. Here’s how to fill the gap.

A team of dressmakers works in a factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Nov. 22, 2012.

This Is What the Future of Globalization Will Look Like

The pandemic proved, once and for all, that the world can’t be flat. But global trade can recover—if we rewrite the rules.

People wait in line to receive food in Queens, New York, on May 11.

To Fight Inequality, the United States Needs an FDR. Can Biden Deliver?

The COVID-19 crisis could lead to a modern-day New Deal—but only if Democrats have the courage to replace failed economic policies with radical reforms.

Illustrations depicting smallpox from  the Imperially Commissioned Golden Mirror of Medical Learning, published in 1742.

Empire’s Little Helper

Chinese history shows that where soldiers march, plague follows.

Civil Rights activists carrying “I Am a Man” placards are blocked by National Guardsmen during a protest in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1968.

Our Top Weekend Reads

America’s founders missed an opportunity to abolish slavery, attacks on the press are increasing in democratic societies, and Trump’s maximum pressure campaign against Iran isn’t working.

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Books in Brief

Read Foreign Policy staffers’ reviews of recent releases on America in the world, English piracy in the Indian Ocean, and mass murder in Indonesia.

George Washington and some of the more than 300 enslaved people who worked at Mount Vernon

How America’s Founding Fathers Missed a Chance to Abolish Slavery

They swept the issue under the rug, and even Thomas Jefferson realized that civil war was inevitable before he died on July 4, 1826. But history could have taken a different direction.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi speaks during a news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on June 3, 2015 in Berlin, Germany.

Lawmakers Allege Egyptian Interference in Torture Suit

A House letter calls the arrests of an Egyptian American human rights advocate’s family a bid to “undermine” the U.S. judicial process.

US Defense Secretary Mark Esper, with US President Donald Trump, speaks on vaccine development on May 15 in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC.

White House to Interview Defense Officials in Perceived Loyalty Test

Interviews with political appointees at the Pentagon raise fears of another purge.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi leaves after a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

IMF Loans Will Further Entrench Corruption in Egypt

Recently disbursed IMF funding will only help the Sisi regime and entrench its rule.

Judges sit in the courtroom at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, The Netherlands, on July 8, 2019.

The United States Has Nothing to Fear From the ICC

The Trump administration’s crusade against the International Criminal Court is misguided and will harm long-term U.S. interests.

Police in riot gear stand in formation during protests on May 29 in Louisville, Kentucky.

These Countries Reformed Their Brutal, Biased Police. The U.S. Can,Too.

Well-meaning reforms are often blocked and rarely succeed. But there are ways to make them stick.

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