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An aerial photo shows the explosion over Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945, shortly after the "Little Boy" atomic bomb was dropped.

The Hiroshima Effect

Seventy-five years after the first nuclear bomb fell, we are grateful it hasn’t happened again, mystified it didn’t, and terrified it still might.

A U.S. serviceman bids farewell to his friend prior to the departure of a detachment of U.S. military police by train from the Coleman Barracks in Mannheim, Germany to Bosnia via Hungary in 1995.

Auf Wiedersehen to a Mostly Successful, Sometimes Rocky Arranged Marriage

From economic woes to racial strife, America’s troop presence in Germany hasn’t always been easy. But it always made an impact.

Russian President Vladimir Putin talks to his Kazakh counterpart Nursultan Nazarbayev in Baku, Azerbaijan in December 2003.

Putin Is Ruling Russia Like a Central Asian Dictator

The Kremlin didn’t invent term limit resets and constitutional referendums. The autocratic leaders of Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan blazed the trail.

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The COVID-19 Global Response Index

From FP Analytics: A country-by-country assessment of government responses to the pandemic.

Indian schoolchildren prepare for their Central Board of Secondary Education senior school certificate examinations in New Delhi on March 1, 2012.

Modi’s Textbook Manipulations

Under cover of the pandemic, the administration has removed chapters on democracy, secularism, and citizenship from schoolbooks.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. President Donald Trump at the G-20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017.

Trump Has Alienated Allies—but Has Them Acting in America’s Interest (and Their Own)

Amidst the torrent of criticism, the administration's accomplishments are often forgotten.

The Qatar flag seen at the Opening Ceremony of the 15th Asian Games at the Khalifa stadium in Doha on Dec. 1, 2006.

How Israel Emerged as an Unlikely Peacemaker in the Middle East

By playing a productive role mediating between Qatar and its foes, the country has carved out a position as the one actor that could ease regional tensions.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu walks past then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden as he prepares to sign the guest book at the prime minister's residence in Jerusalem on March 9, 2010.

Biden Bucks Progressives, Won’t Denounce Israeli Occupation

The Sanders wing has scored a lot of victories in the Democratic platform—but didn’t get all it wanted on Israel.

An aerial view of Marathon Petroleum's refinery in Carson, California, on April 22.

How Biden Could Use Trump’s Trade War Thumbscrews to Fight Climate Change

Fortunately for supporters of aggressive action on global emissions, Trump has demonstrated a highly effective way to circumvent the legislative process.

Children talk with soldiers in a municipality of Chocó, Colombia, on June 9, 2017. The area has grown used to the sight of heavily armed soldiers and continues to see swarms of villagers displaced by clashes between armed groups.

In Colombia, the Pandemic Provides Fertile Ground for Illegal Armed Groups

Criminal bands and fighters are capitalizing on fear to expand their control in vulnerable communities.

A Lebanese couple inspect the damage to their house in an area overlooking the destroyed Beirut Port on Aug. 5, in the aftermath of a pair of massive explosions in the Lebanese capital.

The Beirut Blast Is Lebanon’s Chernobyl

Negligence and corruption have caused a devastating disaster.

A Kashmiri boy looks out from his damaged family house after cross border shelling.

Kashmiris Lament the Loss of Their Youth

While much of India opened up to the world after the country’s 1991 reforms, Kashmir instead became the world’s most militarized zone. A generation of young people have suffered.

Indian security forces stand guard at a roadblock.

Kashmir’s Year of Hopelessness

One year on from New Delhi’s decision to revoke Kashmir’s autonomous privileges, the region remains ignored and underinvested. It’s difficult to see what could change the status quo.

A US military vehicle patrols the oil fields in the town of Qahtaniyah in Syria's northeastern Hasakeh province near the Turkish border, on May 8.

U.S. Troops Really Are in Syria to Protect the Oil—for the Kurds

It’s the only way to get Trump to keep troops on the ground.

A picture shows the destruction at Beirut port in the aftermath of a massive explosion.

Beirut’s Deadly Blast Reignites Anger Against Lebanon’s Ruling Elite

Lebanese people, rocked by a massive port explosion, are fed up with incompetence.

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