Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

A security official waits in front of the door of the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 17. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kingdom’s Hackers and Bots

Saudi Arabia is using cutting-edge technology to track dissidents and stifle dissent.

Geir Pedersen, right, then the U.N. special coordinator for Lebanon, and Michael Williams, the late U.N. troubleshooter, following a meeting with Lebanese Prime Minister Fuad Siniora in Beirut on Feb. 27, 2007. (Joseph Barrak/AFP/Getty Images)

Norwegian Diplomat Tops U.N. Shortlist For Syria Envoy

Geir Pedersen could be saddled with one of diplomacy’s most thankless tasks.

U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, left, shakes hands with South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo before their meeting in Seoul on June 28.

Few Signs of Progress on Denuclearization as U.S., South Korea Cancel Another Major Military Exercise

Current and former U.S. officials say North Korea is dragging its heels, but Seoul and Pyongyang are still talking.

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at the start of the second trilateral meeting with U.S. President Jimmy Carter at Camp David on Sept. 7, 1978. The talks led to the Camp David Accords.(Bettmann Archives via Getty Images)

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listens as State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert speaks to press at the State Department on May 29. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

State Department Considering Public Diplomacy Overhaul

The revamp comes as officials debate how to counter Russian and Chinese influence campaigns.

A truck transports a shipping container at a port in Zhangjiagang, China, on Aug. 7. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trade War Has Claimed Its First Victim

Tariffs from the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, and the EU may have damaged the WTO beyond repair.

Khoisan elders and activists prepare to honor the Khoisan activist Adam Mathysen at his grave on the outskirts of Johannesburg on April 27. (Nathan Siegel for Foreign Policy)

South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

As Pretoria prepares to confront the legacy of colonial and apartheid-era land theft, hardly anyone seems to care about the claims of the country’s earliest inhabitants—the Khoisan.

Galleries

A soldier from the Democratic Republic of the Congo is seen at a military base outside Oicha on Oct. 7. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rocket malfunction in Kazakhstan, and a human tower in Spain.

Displaced Yemeni children from the Hodeidah province shelter in a damaged house on Sept. 30 where they have been living with other displaced families in the southwestern Yemeni city of Taez. The conflict has triggered what the U.N. describes as the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with three-quarters of the population, or 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid. (Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Displaced children in Yemen, farmer protests in New Delhi, and a return to Earth in Kazakhstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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