Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

French President Emmanuel Macron runs to greet people, after the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2018. (PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)

Slow Down, Emmanuel Macron!

The French president is looking toward the future—but his country feels left behind.

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One Small Step for Feminist Foreign Policy

This weekend’s meeting of female foreign ministers will be a historic achievement—and not nearly enough for the world’s women.

A gas flare burns on Norway's Sleipner gas platform on May 15, 2008. (Daniel Sannum-Lauten/AFP/Getty Images)

Norway’s Green Delusions

The country may seem a haven for clean energy, but that’s because it exports its pollution.

Russian President Vladimir Putin waits to greet the South Korean prime minister ahead of their meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok, Russia, on Sept. 12. (Sergei Chirikov/AFP/Getty Images)

Russians Don’t Like the Kremlin’s Election Interference Either

In one gubernatorial race, a scandal might be a sign of Putin’s decline.

Trucks stand ready to haul shipping containers at the Port of Los Angeles, the nation's busiest container port, on Sept. 18. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Trucking Is the Security Crisis You Never Noticed

Everything from food to oil depends on underpaid and overworked drivers.

A Chinese flag flies over a local mosque closed by authorities as an ethnic Uighur woman sells bread at her bakery in Kashgar, Xinjiang province, China, on June 28, 2017. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

China Has Chosen Cultural Genocide in Xinjiang—For Now

It’s expensive to destroy a people without killing them, but Beijing is willing to pay the price.

Galleries

Protesters clash with police during a demonstration against the agreement reached by Greece and Macedonia to resolve a dispute over the former Yugoslav republic's nam during the opening of the 83rd Thessaloniki International Fair in Thessaloniki on Sept. 8. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Protests in Greece, a propaganda extravaganza in North Korea, and a giant pumpkin in England.

Indian Hindu devotees take a vow before forming a human pyramid in a bid to reach and break a dahi handi (curd pot) suspended in the air during celebrations for the Janmashtami festival, which marks the birth of Hindu God Lord Krishna, in Mumbai on Sept. 3. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Gay rights in India, face paint in Kosovo, and camel races in Kenya.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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In Cyberwar, There are No Rules

Why the world desperately needs digital Geneva Conventions.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy.

A Million Mistakes a Second 

Ultrafast computing is critical to modern warfare. But it also ensures a lot could go very wrong, very quickly. 

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

The End of the Fighting General 

America’s top brass should abandon dreams of battlefield glory—and focus on paperwork instead.

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