Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe wearing a face mask attends a press conference at the prime minister's official residence on April 7 in Tokyo.

Japan Is Testing the Limits of Pandemic Economics

Can the world’s most indebted country afford a $1 trillion stimulus?

An aerial view shows the deserted main highway connecting the Saudi cities of Mecca and Jeddah with a monument representing an open Koran, on April 8, 2020, during the novel coronavirus pandemic crisis. (Photo by BANDAR ALDANDANI / AFP) (Photo by BANDAR ALDANDANI/AFP via Getty Images)

OPEC and Russia Talk Oil Price Truce

In the first of two meetings, Saudi Arabia and Russia will decide on oil production cuts as global demand plunges.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (center) and other cabinet ministers listen as Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during his first cabinet meeting after the general election, in London on Dec. 17, 2019.

Keep Calm, the British Government Will Carry On

Boris Johnson’s hospitalization has sparked fears of instability, but the U.K. government has functioned smoothly in the absence of prime ministers in the past and continues to do so today.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders at the Democratic presidential debate in Miami on June 27, 2019. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Republicans View a Biden-Trump Race

Our contributors weigh in on Bernie Sanders’s departure from the U.S. presidential race—and what it means for an election campaign overshadowed by the coronavirus.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Des Moines, Iowa, on Aug. 10, 2019.

Let the Referendum on Trump and Trumpism Begin

The November election isn’t just the most important political event of 2020 in the United States. It’s the most important political event in the world.

A fighter from the Security Belt Force, a separatist flag during clashes between southern separatists and Saudi-backed government forces at the Fayush-Alam crossroads near Aden in southern Yemen on Aug. 30, 2019.

Coronavirus Pandemic Forces a Cease-Fire in Yemen

The war-wracked country turns from one humanitarian disaster to face another.

Sanitation workers in Secunderabad, India

No Masks, No Gloves

With India on lockdown, hundreds of thousands of people are cleaning up trash, medical waste, and even sewage without any protective equipment.

Galleries

A Red Cross volunteer measures the temperature of a man before he is allowed to enter the Nakasero Market in Kampala, Uganda, on April 1. SUMY SADURNI/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Crackdowns to curb coronavirus, a dramatic volcano eruption, and wandering mountain goats.

The Rev. Giuseppe Corbari, a priest in the village of Robbiano, Italy, near Milan, celebrates Mass in front of photographs of his congregation attached to empty pews March 22. The priest appealed to his parishioners to send him selfies so he wouldn’t be alone when celebrating Mass. PIERO CRUCIATTI/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Overwhelmed hospitals, strictly enforced lockdowns, and creative approaches to social distancing.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

deglobalization-localization-lego-globe-ben-fearnley

How to Save Global Capitalism From Itself

Decentralizing decision-making can help left-behind regions get back on track.

brexit-deglobalization-brian-stauffer-illustration

Britain’s Post-Brexit Identity Crisis

Boris Johnson has contradictory ideas for his country’s future—and no clear paths for getting there.

The Ugly End of Chimerica

The coronavirus pandemic has turned a conscious uncoupling into a messy breakup.

The 3 Most Polarizing Words in India

“Jai Shri Ram” was meant to be a celebration of a Hindu deity. But the phrase is turning into hate speech—and a dog whistle for attacks on Muslims.