Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

People march as they take part in a strike to demand action on the global climate crisis on Sept. 20 in New York City.

U.N. Summit Opens With Dire Warnings on Climate Change

The U.N. General Assembly begins today with a major climate summit. Over 100 world leaders will attend, but there’s one glaring absence.

Visitors gather at Tehran's Islamic Revolution and Holy Defense museum during the unveiling of an exhibition of what Iran says are U.S. and other drones captured in its territory, in the capital Tehran on Sept. 21, 2019.

Security Brief: Trump Weighs Cyberattack on Iran

But Pentagon planners caution such a strike could prompt damaging retaliation.

The Hungarian-born author Arthur Koestler, best known for his novel "Darkness At Noon," at his home in Alpbach, Austria.

‘Darkness at Noon’ Revisited

A new translation of Arthur Koestler’s classic dystopian novel reveals what’s relevant to our age—and what isn’t.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference at the Canadian Consulate General in New York City on May 17, 2018.

Our Top Weekend Reads

India-Pakistan tensions escalate, the United States accuses Iran of being behind attacks on Saudi Arabia, and the results of Israel’s election remain uncertain.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi embrace while delivering joint statements in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 26, 2017.

In Texas, Trump Hitches His Wagon to Modi’s Star

Why the U.S. president is befriending the beleaguered prime minister.

Schoolchildren attend a protest march as part of the worlds largest climate strike in Sydney, Australia on Sept. 20, 2019.

Worldwide Climate Strikes Begin

Plus: Rouhani cleared for U.N. visit, Trudeau's troubles deepen, and the other stories we’re following today.

A man holds a picture with Macedonian national hero Goce Delcev in front of the parliament building in Skopje on June 23, 2018 during a protest against the new name of the country, the Republic of North Macedonia.

Refighting the Balkan Wars Won’t Lead to a Seat at the Table in Brussels

Historical feuds still threaten to stop Eastern European countries from joining the EU.

Galleries

Lesotho's Mokhesi Tlholohelo, in blue, and South Sudan's Hal Hal compete during the men's light boxing competition in the African Games in Rabat, Morocco, on Aug. 21. FADEL SENNA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

A lockdown in Kashmir, a movement in Hong Kong, and flowers from Russian President Vladimir Putin in France.

A Hong Kong policeman falls backward during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters during ongoing demonstrations at Hong Kong's International Airport on Aug. 13. MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Conflict in Hong Kong, a lockdown in Kashmir, and wildfires in Indonesia and Greece.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Lower Manhattan in New York City on Oct. 30, 2012, after Hurricane Sandy. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Why Central Banks Need to Step Up on Global Warming

A decade after the world bailed out finance, it’s time for finance to bail out the world.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Can ‘Supercharged’ Plants Solve the Climate Crisis?

Crops already suck up a lot of carbon dioxide. One scientist thinks they can do much more.

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