Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

Relatives visit the tombs of Syrian Democratic Forces fighters in the northern Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani.

Turkey Advances on Kobani in Latest Broken Promise

Erdogan told Trump he would not attack the symbolically important Kurdish-held town in northern Syria.

Women wave a Lebanese national flag and Lebanese Shiite movement flags in front of portraits of Iran's Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah.

Iran’s Proxies Are More Powerful Than Ever

The Trump administration’s maximum pressure strategy is working—just not in the way that matters most.

U.S. Marine Corps Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr., the head of U.S. Central Command, and Lt. Gen. Fahd bin Turki bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, the commander of the Saudi-led coalition forces in Yemen, are shown reportedly Iranian weapons seized by Saudi forces in central Saudi Arabia on July 18.

Trump Is Sending More Troops to Saudi Arabia

They won’t make up for backing out of Syria and failing to stand up to Iran.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu presents U.S. President Donald Trump with a letter from Chinese President Xi Jinping after Trump announced a partial trade agreement with China on Oct. 11 in Washington.

Will the United States and China Ever Reach a Trade Deal?

Both sides face domestic pressure over the trade war, but they won’t make an agreement without mutual trust.

The chairwoman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, poses with a picture of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed in the Nobel Institute in Oslo on October 11, 2019.

Will Abiy Ahmed’s Nobel Prize Tilt Ethiopia’s Election?

Western leaders long saw the authoritarian Meles Zenawi as an indispensable ally. Now, they’ve found a new hero in Abiy Ahmed. But is the Nobel Prize an effort to make amends or influence Ethiopia’s political future?

A line of U.S. military vehicles in Syria's northern city of Manbij on Dec. 30, 2018 after U.S. President Donald Trump first announced in  that U.S. troops would depart Syria.

Kobani Today, Krakow Tomorrow 

Washington has abandoned the Kurds. If Europe doesn’t bolster its defenses, the Poles, Lithuanians, and Latvians could be next. 

A man looks at his phone near a giant image of the Chinese national flag on the side of a building in Beijing on Oct. 23, 2017.

China’s Record on Intellectual Property Rights Is Getting Better and Better

The country is making the transition from net importer of ideas to net innovator, and as it does, it is finding that good patent laws matter.

Galleries

Migrants wait to board in a bus as they transfer to a camp following a rescue operation by a Frontex patrol vessel at the port of Skala Sikamias on the Greek island of Lesbos on Oct. 2. ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Migrants in Greece, an election in Kosovo, and protests in Iraq, Ecuador, and Hong Kong.

A woman carries posters of presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah, Afghanistan's current chief executive officer, ahead of the presidential elections in Herat, Afghanistan on Sept. 23. HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Elections in Afghanistan, testimony in Washington, and a people’s party in China.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Lower Manhattan in New York City on Oct. 30, 2012, after Hurricane Sandy. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Why Central Banks Need to Step Up on Global Warming

A decade after the world bailed out finance, it’s time for finance to bail out the world.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Can ‘Supercharged’ Plants Solve the Climate Crisis?

Crops already suck up a lot of carbon dioxide. One scientist thinks they can do much more.

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