Economics

A worker presents a domestically developed chip at the stand of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. during the China International Semiconductor Expo in Shanghai on Oct. 14.

U.S. Plan to Save Semiconductors Misses the Mark, Defense Firms Say

Companies that make microelectronics for the Pentagon argue that the current bill could maintain U.S. defense dependency on China rather than fix it.

Then-Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 31, 2018.

The Canadian Women Who Changed Trump’s Mind on Tariffs

Chrystia Freeland, Mary Ng, and Kirsten Hillman got the White House to do something rare: back down.

Fishermen work aboard the Good Fellowship fishing trawler in the North Sea, off the coast of North Shields, in northeast England on Jan. 21.

Why Fishing Could Sink Britain’s Brexit Deal With Europe

Diplomatic battles over fish stocks—and the future of struggling coastal communities—threaten to drag the U.K.-EU relationship onto the rocks.

U.S. President Donald Trump exits Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on Oct. 1.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Trump is a pariah for top security experts, Biden won’t end U.S. trade wars, and Saudi Arabia’s bid to rejoin the U.N. Human Rights Council.

The German container ship Bremen Express prepares to dock in Miami on June 10, 2019.

No, Biden Will Not End Trade Wars

Biden has matched Trump’s rhetoric on trade soundbite for soundbite, and his economic plans are likely to make trade conflicts worse.

Israeli and United Arab Emirates flags line a road in the Israeli coastal city of Netanya on Aug. 16.

How ‘Free Zones’ Became the Middle Eastern Diplomacy Tool of Choice

The special economic zones are meant to quietly bring countries together before more public realignments. But do they?

Art for the Global Goals campaign at Liu Bolin Studio in Beijing on Aug. 28, 2015.

The World’s Sustainable Development Goals Aren’t Sustainable

There are big problems with the most important metric used to assess progress toward the U.N.'s environmental goals.

A demonstrator holds a U.S. dollar bill burned during a protest of the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 30, 2010.

Global Capital Is the Tail That Wags the U.S. Economic Dog

Economists have long imagined that the free movement of capital around the world benefits the U.S. economy. It doesn’t.

A commuter crosses a road by London Bridge in London on Sept. 15.

Brexit Is a Distraction from the United Kingdom’s Real Economic Woes

To rebuild its position as a powerhouse, the country will need to focus on its deeper problems.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (left) greets Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro before the opening ceremony in the Non-Aligned Movement summit in Venezuela, on Sept. 17, 2016.

Sanctions Are Driving Iran and Venezuela Into Each Other’s Arms

Maximum pressure has not destroyed the Iranian economy, and Tehran is now sharing its lessons in resilience with Nicolás Maduro’s beleaguered regime in Caracas.

People walk through the Myeongdong shopping district.

COVID-19 Has Crushed Everybody’s Economy—Except for South Korea’s

Seoul seems to have shown the way to mitigating both the health and the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic.

Japan’s chief cabinet secretary, Yoshihide Suga, reacts after he was elected as the new head of the Liberal Democratic Party in Tokyo on Sept. 14.

Suga Promises Continuity. But on Economics, He Can’t Possibly Deliver.

If the yen gets stronger, Japan’s new prime minister will have to come up with something new to protect exports.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is shown during a video meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Berlin on Sept. 14.

China Is Merkel’s Biggest Failure in Office

The German chancellor has put future deals over moral values, but she’s not alone.

Economy-pandemic-imf-feature-gita-gopinath-kristalina-georgieva

Emerging Stronger From the Great Lockdown

The managing director and the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund lay out a strategy for sustained recovery.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and European Council President Charles Michel bump elbows at the end of a news conference in Brussels on July 21.

The Pandemic Is Showing What the EU Is Good For

No longer sclerotic, Europe’s economy is bouncing back much faster than the United States’.

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