Economics

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

A loaded cargo ship sits in the Yangshan Deep-Water Port in China on Dec. 6, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Dangers of Trade Orthodoxy

By shoving the very idea of trade tensions under the table, models undermine coherent discussion of how to handle them.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He talk to reporters at the White House on April 4. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Win-Win U.S.-China Trade Deal Is Possible

Selling more goods is not enough. Trump’s trade agreement with Beijing must include real structural reforms.

Shinzo Abe speaks at his party's headquarters in Oct. 2017 (Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

How Japan Became the Adult at the Trade Table

While Washington withdraws from multilateral deals, Tokyo has been uncharacteristically leading efforts to save them.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party gestures during a roadshow in support of the party's state assembly election party candidates in Varanasi on March 4. (Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)

Is India’s Modi a Reformer or a Performer?

In the world’s biggest democracy, good politics often have nothing to do with good economics.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses trade policy with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at the White House on April 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

In Trump’s Economy, the Invisible Hand Belongs to the Government

The state’s role in the U.S. economy has expanded dramatically under President Trump, even as he pushes China to exert less control.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at the White House on March 15, 2018. (Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)

Trans-Atlantic Trade Is Headed Toward Disaster

Trump is mulling new auto tariffs that could send the global economy into a tailspin.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel stands among flags as she attends a signing ceremony after consultations between China and Germany in Berlin on July 9, 2018. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Europe Gets Its Competition With China All Wrong

Protecting the liberal order won’t be enough. The EU will also have to challenge China for influence around the world.

Algerian protesters gather during a mass demonstration against President Abdelaziz Bouteflika in Algiers on March 29. (AFP/Getty Images)

Algeria’s Bouteflika Is on His Way Out. Here’s What’s Next.

The longtime president may depart as soon as this week, but the country’s growing protest movement has not yet united behind one leader or policy platform.

Anti-Brexit activists demonstrate with a model of Theresa May outside the Houses of Parliament in London on April 1, 2019, as MPs debate alternative alternative options for Brexit

Britain’s Crisis Isn’t Constitutional. It’s Political.

A Remain Parliament is confronting a Brexit electorate—and none of the solutions on offer is likely to resolve the stalemate anytime soon.

A pro-Brexit activist holds a placard outside the Houses of Parliament in central London on March 20.

Why Europe Should Reject Theresa May’s Brexit Extension

If Britain remains in the European Union due to a botched Brexit, its demands for special treatment will end up wrecking the EU.

Three Boeing 737 Max 8 planes from Shanghai Airlines parked at Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport on March 11, 2019.

Boeing’s Crisis Strengthens Beijing’s Hand

In its trade standoff with the United States, China’s Ace could be the 737 Max.

Local fishermen’s boats moor at Berbera port, in the breakaway territory of Somaliland, on July 21, 2018. (Mustafa Saeed/AFP/Getty Images)

For Somaliland and Djibouti, Will New Friends Bring Benefits?

Interest in the Horn of Africa from foreign powers has always been a double-edged sword.

Several hundred white supremacists carrying tiki torches march through the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville on Aug. 11, 2017. (Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Neo-Nazis Bet Big on Bitcoin (And Lost)

How the far-right's failed cryptocurrency gamble became a bad joke for the Christchurch killer.

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