Energy

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How Venezuela Struck It Poor

The tragic — and totally avoidable — self-destruction of one of the world’s richest oil economies.

Mexican President Elect Andres Manuel López Obrador speaks after his electoral victory, Mexico City, Mexico, Jul. 1, 2018. (Pedro Mera/Getty Images)

Mexico’s Populist New President Unlikely to Derail Energy Reform

López Obrador won’t reverse the country’s historic oil opening — but he won’t expand it, either.

Family members shout slogans as they wait outside the Kobar prison in north Khartoum to welcome their loved ones after Sudan released dozens of opposition activists Feb. 18 who were arrested in January when authorities cracked down on protests against rising food prices. (Ebrahim Hamid/AFP/Getty Images)

Sanctions Against Sudan Didn’t Harm an Oppressive Government — They Helped It

The end of economic isolation hasn’t brought a financial windfall or more freedom. Instead, the regime is as strong as ever while ordinary people suffer.

An Iraqi worker at an oil refinery in Nasiriyah, Oct. 30, 2015. (Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Agrees to Boost Oil Output

The oil cartel vowed to add 1 million barrels a day to markets. It won’t add quite that much.

A Libyan fireman stands in front of smoke and flames rising from a storage tank at an oil facility in northern Libya's Ras Lanuf region on January 23, 2016, after it was set ablaze earlier in the week following attacks launched by Islamic State jihadists to seize key port terminals.

The West Is Letting Libya Tear Itself Apart

Calling for elections in the absence of stable institutions while competing for diplomatic and economic influence won’t rebuild the country — it will destroy it.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak at an OPEC meeting in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Close to Agreement to Open the Oil Taps

With or without Iranian cooperation, extra barrels of crude could help meet rising demand. But there’s still reason to fear a price spike later this year.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Galleries

Afghan pigeon fancier Abdul Ghani feeds his pigeons as they fly from the rooftop of his home in Herat province on June 30. HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

A pigeon fancier in Afghanistan, migrants in the Mediterranean, and a fire-breathing stuntman in India.

The full moon rises behind burning moorland as a large wildfire sweeps across the moors between Dovestones and Buckton Vale in Stalybridge, England.  (Anthony Devlin/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

A fiery moon over England, a chess champion in Nepal, and rhino relocation in Kenya.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

The Red Dress illustration for Foreign Policy

Learning to Work With Robots

AI will change everything. Workers must adapt — or else.

Print

Facing the Future of Work

How to adapt to robots, AI, trade wars, and an aging planet.

How Venezuela Struck It Poor

The tragic — and totally avoidable — self-destruction of one of the world’s richest oil economies.

The Occupation as Entertainment

The second season of the acclaimed TV thriller “Fauda” obscures the dark realities of Israeli rule in the West Bank.