Europe

French President Emmanuel Macron runs to greet people, after the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2018. (PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)

Slow Down, Emmanuel Macron!

The French president is looking toward the future—but his country feels left behind.

Trucks stand ready to haul shipping containers at the Port of Los Angeles, the nation's busiest container port, on Sept. 18. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Trucking Is the Security Crisis You Never Noticed

Everything from food to oil depends on underpaid and overworked drivers.

A Kosovar police officer walks past burning logs as Kosovo Albanians gather around a barricade blocking access to a village due to be visited by the Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, on the main road between Mitrovica, in the north of Kosovo, and the village of Banje, a Serbian enclave on Sept. 9.

Partition in Kosovo Will Lead to Disaster

Ill-advised land swaps and population transfers won’t bring peace. They’re more likely to revive the bloodshed that plagued the Balkans during the 1990s.

Activists protest during an anti-corruption rally in front of the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev on Oct. 22, 2017. (SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images)

The Corrupt Shall Inherit Ukraine

In a country where even the anti-corruption prosecutors abuse their power, it's hard to say who the good guys are.

People attend a demonstration against Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Sept. 16 in Budapest as the European Commission considered disciplinary action against Orban's policies. (Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images)

The End of Viktor Orban’s Peacock Dance

As the European Union takes long overdue measures to punish the Hungarian regime, the prime minister appears to be moving from rhetorical to real repression.

A demonstrator holds a banner in front of the parliament building in Skopje on June 13, 2018 during a protest against an agreement with Greece to change Macedonia's name. (Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images)

For Macedonia, Is Joining NATO and the EU Worth the Trouble?

A referendum could decide whether the country will change its name to gain entrance. But those prizes have lost their shine.

Italys Interior Minister and deputy PM Matteo Salvini (R) and Italys Labor and Industry Minister and deputy PM Luigi Di Maio gesture during the swearing in ceremony of the new government led by Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte at Quirinale Palace in Rome on June 1, 2018. (ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Been 25 Years Since Anyone in Italy Trusted the Government

Italian populism is still fueled by corruption scandals that are over two decades old.

The “Founding Fathers” exhibit at the House of European History highlights key architects of European integration. (Dominique Hommel/European Union 2018 – EP)

Night at the Museum

Brussels’s new European history museum could put anyone to sleep.

A statue of King Augustus the Strong in Dresden, Germany. (Via Getty Images)

East Germany’s Far-Right Problem Is 300 Years Old

There are deep—very deep—historical reasons why far-right resentment has flourished in eastern Germany.

Viktor Orban gestures during a debate about Hungary as part of a plenary session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg on September 11, 2018. (Frederick Florian/AFP/Getty Images)

In Hungary, Social Conservatism and Authoritarianism Aren’t the Same

The European Parliament needs to start condemning Orban for the right reasons.

A photo taken on Sept. 10, 2018 in Stockholm shows a selection of front pages of Swedish newspapers in Stockholm a day after the general elections. (Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)

Sweden’s Far Right Has Won the War of Ideas

An election fought on the Sweden Democrats’ terms leaves the far-right party in control of the country’s agenda.

In this handout photo issued by the London Metropolitan Police, poisoning suspects Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov are shown on CCTV in Salisbury on March 4. (Metropolitan Police via Getty Images)

Russia’s Military Intelligence Agency Isn’t Stupid

Don’t let the reporting on the suspected Skripal attackers fool you: Moscow got what it wanted.

Susanne Engman illustration for Foreign Policy

Swedes Can’t Go Home Again

In the run-up to Sweden’s election, one word explains why the country used to feel like a family—and why it now feels adrift.

The dollar’s dominant role in the global financial system, and thus U.S. sanctions power, is driving the search for alternatives. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

The Buck Stops Here: Europe Seeks Alternative to U.S.-Dominated Financial System

Germany and France complain that the U.S. is abusing sanctions power to bully even its allies.

Kotryna Zukauskaite illustration for Foreign Policy

Germany’s Return of the Repressed 

The country’s far-right wants to revive ethnic nationalism. The left must come up with its own alternative.

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