Features

Wheelwrights at Work, circa 1890. (Photo by Past Pix/SSPL/Getty Images)

There’s No Such Thing as a Stable Career

Job insecurity has always been a fact of life. Just ask chimney sweeps, lectors, and telephone operators.

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How Conservation Became Colonialism

Indigenous people, not environmentalists, are the key to protecting the world’s most precious ecosystems.

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Facing the Future of Work

How to adapt to robots, AI, trade wars, and an aging planet.

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Longtime Neighbors

The hidden history of Poland’s Muslims.

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How Venezuela Struck It Poor

The tragic — and totally avoidable — self-destruction of one of the world’s richest oil economies.

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C. in December 1987. (AFP/Getty Images)

When Ronnie Met Mikhail​

On our podcast: As Trump sits down with Putin, we look back at a summit in Reykjavik that helped end the Cold War.

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Learning to Work With Robots

AI will change everything. Workers must adapt — or else.

Peruvian players huddle prior before the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between Australia and Peru at Fisht Stadium on June 26 in Sochi, Russia. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

Peru’s National Identity Was Bound Up With Conflict and Corruption for Decades — Then It Qualified for the World Cup.

On our podcast, how a country scores two goals in the soccer tournament and finds redemption.

A migrant child looks out the window of a bus as protesters try to block a bus carrying migrant children out of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection Detention Center on June 23 in McAllen, Texas.  (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

They Took the Children for a Bath and Never Brought Them Back

On our podcast: An immigration lawyer tells harrowing stories of asylum-seekers at the southern U.S. border.

Gina Haspel is sworn in during her confirmation hearing to become CIA director in Washington, D.C., on May 9. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

He Feared the CIA Would Delete a Document Detailing Its Torture Program. So He Took It.

On our podcast: A Senate investigator who exposed the agency’s torture secrets tells his story.

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State of the Trade Wars

Tracking U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariffs — and the retaliatory measures other countries are taking.

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Stalin Falsified the Data, Then Killed the Statisticians

How the Soviet Union facilitated the famine of the 1930s that killed millions of Ukrainians, then buried the evidence.

TOPSHOT - People watch a television news screen showing file footage of a North Korean missile launch, at a railway station in Seoul on August 29, 2017.
Nuclear-armed North Korea fired a ballistic missile over Japan and into the Pacific Ocean on August 29 in a major escalation by Pyongyang amid tensions over its weapons ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

This American Visited North Korea’s Most Sensitive Nuke Sites. What He Saw Blew His Mind.

North Koreans wanted the renowned scientist Siegfried Hecker to know they could hide their bomb material and the United States would never find it.

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Two Years Later, No Amnesty for the GOP’s Never Trump Camp

Many remain critical, others have repented, but all are shut out from the Trump State Department.

Rohingya refugees in Balukhali camp on January 13, 2018 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Rohingyas Were Shot, Hacked With Machetes, and Then They Made for the Border

Relief worker Pavlos Kolovos watched as one of the world’s worst refugee crises unfolded in real time.

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