Ideas

A pedestrian lights a cigarette as he walks past in banners with portraits of Turrkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) and the leader of Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) Devlet Bahceli in Istanbul on June 19, 2018. - Turkey is preparing for tight presidential and parliamentary elections on June 24, while many analysts say President Erdogan wants a major foreign policy success to give him a final boost. (Photo by Aris MESSINIS / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of Sunday’s Elections in Turkey

Turks will vote to elect not only a president but also a parliament—a first in the country’s history.

Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wave the Turkish national flag during a pre-election rally in Sarajevo, on May 20. (Oliver Bunic/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan Is Making the Ottoman Empire Great Again

Turkey is leveraging tradition to expand its power in Europe — but the history cuts both ways.

An F-35A gets ready to drop a weapon over the Sea Test Range in Point Mugu, California, on Aug. 12, 2016. (Chad Bellay/Lockheed Martin)

The Countries Where F-35 Sales Are Taking Off

Tracking the growing global fleet of stealth fighters.

Gina Haspel is sworn in during her confirmation hearing to become CIA director in Washington, D.C., on May 9. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

He Feared the CIA Would Delete a Document Detailing Its Torture Program. So He Took It.

On our podcast: A Senate investigator who exposed the agency’s torture secrets tells his story.

Outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson makes a statement on his departure from the State Department March 13. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The Quiet Death of Tillerson’s ‘Redesign’ of State

Overhauling Foggy Bottom was once a centerpiece of the Trump administration’s reforms. Where did those plans go?

Brazilian congressman and presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, waves to the crowd during a military event in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 3, 2018.

Latin America’s Center Cannot Hold If It Doesn’t Exist

Mainstream establishment parties across the continent have been replaced by populists offering easy and empty answers.

A television broadcast of a meeting between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Chinese President Xi Jinping in Seoul, South Korea on March 28.  (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Xi and Kim’s Marriage of Convenience

The Chinese president is briefed on the Singapore summit during the North Korean leader’s third state visit.

The Egyptian national team's star striker Mohamed Salah, left, and Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov pose in Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, on June 10, ahead of the 2018 World Cup in Russia. (Karim Jaafar/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s Muslim Strongman Is Winning the World Cup

Ramzan Kadyrov is using sports diplomacy to bolster his image.

A large flag of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a campaign rally on June 19, 2018 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Don’t Trust Anybody About Turkey’s Elections

The one thing that's clear about Erdogan's re-election bid is that everything is unclear.

An Iraqi worker at an oil refinery in Nasiriyah, Oct. 30, 2015. (Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Agrees to Boost Oil Output

The oil cartel vowed to add 1 million barrels a day to markets. It won’t add quite that much.

A Libyan fireman stands in front of smoke and flames rising from a storage tank at an oil facility in northern Libya's Ras Lanuf region on January 23, 2016, after it was set ablaze earlier in the week following attacks launched by Islamic State jihadists to seize key port terminals.

The West Is Letting Libya Tear Itself Apart

Calling for elections in the absence of stable institutions while competing for diplomatic and economic influence won’t rebuild the country — it will destroy it.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak at an OPEC meeting in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

OPEC Close to Agreement to Open the Oil Taps

With or without Iranian cooperation, extra barrels of crude could help meet rising demand. But there’s still reason to fear a price spike later this year.

U.S. President Donald Trump and National Security Advisor John Bolton during a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House on May 22. (Oliver Contreras-Pool/Getty Images)

Singapore Was John Bolton’s Worst Nightmare

U.S. President Donald Trump’s national security advisor was marginalized at the summit, but his hard-nosed approach will be essential to dismantling North Korea’s nukes.

Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

State of the Trade Wars

Tracking U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariffs — and the retaliatory measures other countries are taking.

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