Middle East & Africa
Iran rials, pictured on April 11, 2011.

Iran Has a Bitcoin Strategy to Beat Trump

As the United States expands its sanctions, Iran has been ramping up its use of cryptocurrencies to get around them.

Brian Hook, the U.S. special representative on Iran

Pentagon Steps Up Cruise Missile Defenses as Iranian Threat Grows

U.S. to expand network of spy satellites to better detect and track cruise missiles, drones, and hypersonic weapons.

The tiny village of Kumzar on the northernmost tip of Oman's Musandam peninsula on March 14, 2012, overlooking the strategic Straits of Hormuz.

Oman’s Smooth Transition Doesn’t Mean Its Neighbors Won’t Stir Up Trouble

Regional rivals may see Sultan Qaboos’s death as an opportunity to pursue their expansionist ambitions.

Protesters hold posters showing Iranian commander Qassem Suleimani during a protest outside the U.S. Consulate in Istanbul on Jan. 5.

The U.S. Can Deter Iran but Not Its Proxies

Rash action by Tehran-connected groups could provoke an escalatory cycle.

A view of the damage at Ain al-Assad military air base

More U.S. Troops Treated for Concussion Symptoms as Trump Downplays ‘Headaches’

Veterans criticize president for dismissing possibility that U.S. personnel suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iran missile strike.

French President Emmanuel Macron is greeted by Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara at the Félix Houphouët-Boigny International Airport in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on Dec. 20, 2019.

The Rise and Fall of Another African Donor Darling

Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara has won plaudits for his economic successes, but there are cracks in his democratic facade.

Anti-government protesters and riot police clash following the announcement of a new Lebanese government in Beirut on Jan. 22.

Lebanon’s Halloween Government

Protesters are right—the extent to which the country’s new cabinet brings it closer to Iran is spooky.

Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed (R) and his wife, Zinash Tayachew, wave to the crowd from the balcony of the Grand Hotel in Oslo on Dec. 10, 2019

Will Abiy Ahmed’s Bet on Ethiopia’s Political Future Pay Off?

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning prime minister has disbanded Africa’s largest political party in an effort to reinvent the country’s politics—but some powerful players stand to lose, and they won’t go quietly.

American actor George Clooney takes part in a press conference in central London to present a report on atrocities in South Sudan on Sept. 19, 2019.

Satellite Surveillance Can Trace Atrocities but Not Stop Them

George Clooney’s pioneering data project documented horrors in Sudan, but that wasn’t enough.

Members of Code Pink protest as Former National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Committee Jan. 14, 2020 in Washington.

Outrage Culture Is Ruining Foreign Policy

As the 2020 presidential campaign heats up, U.S. politics is getting harder and harder to explain to the rest of the world.

Activists rally for climate action at Sydney Town Hall

Our Top Weekend Reads

Australia’s climate denialist media, a pro-independence mandate in Taiwan, and power-sharing returns to Northern Ireland.

Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias (right) meets with Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar (left) in Athens, Greece, on Jan. 17, 2020, ahead of a peace conference in Berlin aimed at ending the civil war in Libya.

Russia’s Role in the Libyan Civil War Gives It Leverage Over Europe

Russia has played all sides in the conflict to get a seat at the negotiating table. Now it wants an end to sanctions.

Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok arrives prior to a bilateral meeting with the European Union's minister for foreign affairs and security policy at the EU headquarters in Brussels on Nov. 11, 2019.

Sudan’s New Prime Minister Grapples With His Country’s Past

Abdalla Hamdok wasn't sure he wanted the job, but six months later there is reason to hope—despite the failed mutiny this week.

iran-us-plane-crash-1988-document-article

Anatomy of an Accidental Shootdown

Three decades ago, a perfect storm of miscommunication, miscalculation, and human error in the heat of battle caused the United States to make a mistake similar to the one Iran just did.

Iraqi mourners gather at the Shaheed Mohammed Baqir al-Sadr Bridge in Basra, Iraq, on Jan. 7, 2019, as they welcome the body of Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the slain chief of Hashed al-Shaabi, an Iraqi paramilitary force with close ties to Iran.

Qassem Suleimani Wanted U.S. Troops Out of Iraq. If They Go, ISIS Will Be Back.

The slain Iranian general helped defeat the Islamic State in Iraq, but his death is likely to unleash the sort of sectarian strife that Sunni extremists thrive on.

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