Middle East & Africa
Former Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubeye Maiga (2L) is received in Mopti on his visit to Mali's central region on October 14, 2018. (Photo by Michele Cattani/ AFP/Getty Images)

Dumping One Government Won’t Fix Mali

March’s deadly massacre exposed the lack of progress since the country’s peace accords—and the many political and security reforms that are needed.

Document of the Week: Jared Kushner’s Mideast Peace Email

“Our goal can’t be to keep things stable and as they are, our goal had to be to make things significantly BETTER!”

Supporters of Yemen's Houthi rebels attend a rally  in Sanaa, Yemen, on March 26. (Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Yemen Veto Could Still Cost Saudis

Democratic lawmaker mulls sanctioning Saudis tied to the humanitarian blockade on the war-torn country.

A miner stands on a mound of dirt at an abandoned industrial mine March 28, 2006 in Mongbwalu, Congo. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Your Cell Phone Is Spreading Ebola

A deadly outbreak in Congo has become a global emergency because of a raging conflict over valuable minerals.

Cars drive on a new Israeli road divided by a wall to separate it for Palestinians (L) and the side to be used exclusively by Israelis and settlers (R) in East Jerusalem, on January 10, 2019. Route 4370 connects the settlement of Geva Binyamin to the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway. The road, which has been called the Apartheid Road, is divided in the middle by a 25-foot wall.

Separation and a Two-State Solution Aren’t the Same

Netanyahu is not the only one who opposes basic Palestinian rights. Almost all Israeli leaders reject the fundamental tenets of sovereignty that would make a Palestinian state genuine and viable.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, attend a ceremony marking the completion of the sea part of the TurkStream gas pipeline in Istanbul on Nov. 19, 2018. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s Gas Web Ensnares Europe

New pipeline projects throughout the Middle East could boost Russian influence there while also ensuring the country’s role as the prime supplier of energy to Europe.

An Ultra-Orthodox Israeli man, accompanied by his children, prepares to cast his ballot at a polling station in Bnei Brak, near the city of Tel Aviv, on March 17, 2015.

The Ultra-Orthodox Will Determine Israel’s Political Future

Netanyahu’s embrace and the left’s hostility have made the fast-growing Haredi Jewish population the right’s most reliable constituency.

The Israeli Arab politician Ahmed Tibi casts his vote during Israel's parliamentary elections in in the northern Israeli town of Taiyiba on April 9. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

How Israel Marginalizes Its Arab Citizens

Disaffection prompted the lowest voter turnout in years among Arab Israelis.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Sudanese demonstrators protest outside the army headquarters in Khartoum on April 12. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

FP’s latest on the turmoil in Sudan, Benjamin Netanyahu’s re-election, and Julian Assange’s arrest.

Supporters attend a pro-government rally for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv in in March 2015. (Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images)

How Israel’s Netanyahu Uses Fear and Loathing to Win Elections

On the podcast: The Israeli journalist Anshel Pfeffer looks back at Bibi’s first general election campaign in 1996.

Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards Corps march during the annual military parade marking the anniversary of the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq war in Tehran on Sept. 22, 2018. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

The Revolutionary Guards Are Ready to Strike Back

The Trump administration has labeled Iran’s most powerful military branch a terrorist organization—and put Americans around the world in danger.

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