Middle East & Africa
Rafael Grossi, the new director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, on Sept. 20.

Rafael Grossi Isn’t America’s—or Iran’s, or North Korea’s—Man

The new head of the IAEA was the United States’ preferred candidate. But, as global tensions rise, he quickly needs to prove his independence.

Turkish-backed Syrian Arab fighters man a checkpoint in the Kurdish-majority city of Afrin in northern Syria after seizing control of it from the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) on March 18, 2018.

The Fight for ISIS’s Old Territory Is Just Beginning

A host of forces including Turkish and Iranian proxies to Russian troops and Syrian government forces are jockeying for control of the lands that once were held by the Islamic State.

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy

‘We Are Telegraphing Abandonment’

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy slams the Trump administration for withholding aid to Lebanon.

Nzeyimana Consolate arrives carrying her baby at the Nyabitara transit site, among other Burundian refugees, on Oct. 3, 2019 in Ruyigi, Burundi. Nearly 600 Burundians who fled political violence in their home country to Tanzania were repatriated voluntarily, the U.N. refugee agency  said.

Sending Refugees Back Makes the World More Dangerous

Repatriating refugees to dangerous countries violates international law and breeds conflict, instability, and future crises. Regional work visas and long-term integration into host countries are more promising solutions.

A convoy of U.S. armored vehicles patrols the northeastern Syrian town of Qahtaniyah

No ‘End Date’ for U.S. Troops in Syria

Top general is confident he can keep pressure on the Islamic State, but a recent watchdog report says the group could reconstitute.

Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, the commander of U.S. Central Command

Top U.S. General: It’s ‘Very Possible’ Iran Will Attack Again

The threat from Tehran continues to increase despite U.S. military buildup, U.S. Central Command’s Gen. Kenneth McKenzie says.

U.S. Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee Nov. 20, 2019 in Washington.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Impeachment drama on full display in Washington, fallout of the U.S. recognition of Israeli settlements, and the legacy of Bolivian President Evo Morales.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Back to the Wall, Netanyahu Fights for His Political Life

Even after a devastating indictment, it may be too soon to count out the Israeli prime minister known as “the magician.”

A sign shows a new neighborhood project near the Israeli settlement of Shavei Shomron on Nov. 19.

Recognizing Israeli Settlements Marks the Final Collapse of Pax Americana

From now on, the United States will have trouble fending off other territorial claims.

Rioters run in the streets of Tehran in August 1953.

Don’t Just Blame Washington for the 1953 Iran Coup

Declassified evidence shows that Iranians, including clerics, played a significant role in the events of Aug. 19, 1953—and that after an earlier failed coup attempt, the CIA was left in the dark.

A view of houses in the Israeli settlement of Kedumim in the West Bank.

U.S. Recognition of Settlements Will Harm Israel More Than It Helps

The Trump administration’s disdain for international consensus on the West Bank will encourage previously cautious governments to support BDS and Palestinian statehood.

Saudi Prince Khalid bin Salman

Can a Young Saudi Prince End the War in Yemen?

Khalid bin Salman is working full time to extricate Saudi Arabia from the disastrous conflict begun by his brother. Some regional and U.S. officials are cautiously optimistic. 

View of Tehran shops that were destroyed after nationwide demonstrations broke out in protest of fuel price hikes and led to widespread destruction of property, on Nov. 20.

Iran Protests Suggest Trump Sanctions Are Inflicting Serious Pain

The regime has survived uprisings in the past. But now it is starting to kill demonstrators in great numbers.

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