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U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during the 2019 International Women of Courage awards ceremony.

State Department Misled Public, Congress About Revoking Journalist’s Award for Criticizing Trump

An inspector general’s report concludes that State officials nixed a high-profile award out of fear of offending higher-ups—then lied about it.

President Donald Trump speaks alongside Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The State Department’s Struggles to Diversify Just Got Harder

Trump’s executive order taking aim at diversity training could make it even harder to fix the State Department’s dismal record on inclusion.

A Lebanese woman draped in a national flag

‘We Have Nothing Here’: A Collapsing Lebanon Sparks an Exodus of Despair

A country that previously took in refugees could become an exporter of people as government ineptitude and an economic cataclysm destroy all hope.

Arman Omari, 25, sits in Nangarhar's Momand Dara district in Afghanistan on Sept. 19.

Feeling Abandoned by Kabul, Many Rural Afghans Flock to Join the Taliban

“My hope is with the Taliban,” said one new recruit who has known only war and broken promises.

Members of the South Korean Navy

North Korea Kills, Torches South Korean Civilian in Bizarre Maritime Incident

The confusing affair could make it even harder for South Korean President Moon Jae-in to continue warming up to the North.

Top U.S. arms negotiator Marshall Billingslea and Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere

U.S. Allies Worry Trump Administration Might Let Key Nuclear Treaty With Russia Die

Internal documents acknowledge concern among allies about the expiration of the Obama-era New START accord, but U.S. negotiators are still playing hardball.

Actor Charlie Sheen attends a charity softball game to benefit “California Strong” at Pepperdine University on January 13, 2019 in Malibu, California. (Rich Polk/Getty Images for California Strong)

How Russia Tried to Weaponize Charlie Sheen

What’s behind an odd, international campaign to free a Russian operative from a Libyan jail?

A view of a mostly deserted lapis lazuli mining encampment in the Afghan province of Badakhshan on Oct. 16, 2016.

The Taliban, at Least, Are Striking Gold in Afghanistan

The militant group mines almost half a billion dollars a year from Afghan soil—and wants more.

U.S. President Donald Trump sits with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

How Pompeo Blurs the Line Between Diplomacy and Politics

Pompeo's speeches in potential battleground states during official State Department trips have drawn fire from Democratic lawmakers.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a news conference to announce the Trump administration's restoration of sanctions on Iran, on September 21, 2020, at the US State Department in Washington, DC.

U.S. Isolated at U.N. as Push to Ramp Up Pressure on Iran Fails

“We don’t need a cheering section,” said Trump’s U.N ambassador. But Washington does need international compliance to make snapback sanctions work.

A migrant mother walks in front of a wall outside the Moria refugee camp in Lesbos, Greece, on Aug. 11, a month before the devastating September fire.

Europe’s Failed Migration Policy Caused Greece’s Latest Refugee Crisis

The burning of the Moria refugee camp in Lesbos has exposed the EU’s short-sighted, inhumane, and ineffective approach to asylum.

People pass a Huawei logo at a trade fair in Berlin

The Huawei Ban Could Crush U.S. Overseas Aid Efforts 

A new law meant to keep Chinese telecoms out of American networks threatens to make life impossible for diplomats, aid workers, and the military across much of Africa and Asia.

Bahrain Foreign Affairs Minister Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, U.S. President Donald Trump, and United Arab Emirates Foreign Affairs Minister Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan at the signing ceremony of the Abraham Accords at the White House on Sept. 15.

For Netanyahu, Normalization Deals Are a Long-Awaited Vindication

But the White House ceremony is marred by events back in Israel, including his mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga (R) leaves the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo on April 5, 2017, after his press conference announcing North Korea's ballistic missile launch into the Sea of Japan.

Japan’s Suga Will Struggle to Pull off Abe’s Defense Transformation

The new Japanese prime minister shares many of outgoing Shinzo Abe’s policies—but isn’t as wedded to Abe’s big overhaul.

Afghans use computers at the Park Residence Internet Cafe in Kabul on Jan. 20, 2003.

In Afghanistan, Social Media Is the Only Way to Talk Back to the Taliban

As the United States abandons demands for human rights, young Afghans are embracing free speech the only place they can—on the Internet.

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