Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner meet with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) at the King David Hotel May 22, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel.

For Palestinians, America Was Never an Honest Broker

The Trump administration’s policies don’t represent a radical shift. The White House has simply abandoned the facade of neutrality and rubber-stamped the Israeli government’s agenda.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, center, prepares to give the opening address of the historic Israel-PLO Oslo Accords signing ceremony on Sept. 13, 1993 at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat at his side. (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

The Oslo Accords Are Dead, but There Is Still a Path to Peace

On the 25th anniversary of the landmark Israeli-Palestinian deal, activists and diplomats should focus on recreating the conditions that made it possible.

Sri Lankan women gather to demand peace talks between the government and Tamil Tiger rebels in Colombo on Dec. 10, 2004. (Sena Vidanagama/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Make Peace Stick

When only men sit at the negotiating table, cease-fires fall apart.

A Muslim man walks by the "separation barrier" or "security fence" in East Jerusalem on November 27, 2014 in Jerusalem, Israel.

An Israeli-Palestinian Confederation Can Work

The two-state solution is dead. Most one-state solutions are unacceptable to the other side. There is, however, a viable peace plan that appeals to both.

Mahmoud Abbas waits to address the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, September 20, 2017 in New York City.

Mohammed bin Salman Has Thrown the Palestinians Under the Bus

The United States and Arab governments have abandoned the Palestinian cause and believe they can browbeat Mahmoud Abbas into submission.

Donald Trump sings the national anthem with a U.S. Army chorus during a "Celebration of America" event on the south lawn of the White House June 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Is Trump’s America the Safest Country in the World?

The world is less dangerous than it was a year ago — but the long-term trends, if you're not American, have gotten cloudier.

South Korean President Moon Jae-In and U.S. President Donald Trump    at the presidential Blue House on November 7, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea.

Trump Is Following, Not Leading

The United States has outsourced its foreign policy to regional allies. In South Korea, it might lead to peace — in Israel, it’s more likely leading to war.

Galleries

Protesters clash with police during a demonstration against the agreement reached by Greece and Macedonia to resolve a dispute over the former Yugoslav republic's nam during the opening of the 83rd Thessaloniki International Fair in Thessaloniki on Sept. 8. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Protests in Greece, a propaganda extravaganza in North Korea, and a giant pumpkin in England.

Indian Hindu devotees take a vow before forming a human pyramid in a bid to reach and break a dahi handi (curd pot) suspended in the air during celebrations for the Janmashtami festival, which marks the birth of Hindu God Lord Krishna, in Mumbai on Sept. 3. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Gay rights in India, face paint in Kosovo, and camel races in Kenya.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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In Cyberwar, There are No Rules

Why the world desperately needs digital Geneva Conventions.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy.

A Million Mistakes a Second 

Ultrafast computing is critical to modern warfare. But it also ensures a lot could go very wrong, very quickly. 

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

The End of the Fighting General 

America’s top brass should abandon dreams of battlefield glory—and focus on paperwork instead.

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