Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, chairs a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Sept. 17. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Can Nikki Haley Deliver One Last Time?

It’s not too late for Trump’s departing U.N. ambassador to cut Washington’s peacekeeping costs.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat shake hands before a meeting in Oslo to discuss the Mideast peace process on Nov. 2, 1999. (Lise Aserud/AFP/Getty Images)

If Trump Wants the Ultimate Deal, He Must Not Repeat These Mistakes

Israeli-Palestinian peace is elusive because both sides—and the United States—have made a series of damaging but preventable errors.

A United Nations  peacekeeper speaks to a child while on patrol through the streets Gao, Mali on August 3, 2018.

Peace Is the Best Investment

U.N. member states must renew their commitment to the vital peacekeeping operations that end wars, protect civilians, and save lives.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, center, prepares to give the opening address of the historic Israel-PLO Oslo Accords signing ceremony on Sept. 13, 1993 at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat at his side. (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

The Oslo Accords Are Dead, but There Is Still a Path to Peace

On the 25th anniversary of the landmark Israeli-Palestinian deal, activists and diplomats should focus on recreating the conditions that made it possible.

Sri Lankan women gather to demand peace talks between the government and Tamil Tiger rebels in Colombo on Dec. 10, 2004. (Sena Vidanagama/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Make Peace Stick

When only men sit at the negotiating table, cease-fires fall apart.

An engraving at the French National Library shows the ratification of the Peace of Westphalia in Nuremberg, Germany, on June 16, 1650. (Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

Meet the Middle East’s Peace of Westphalia Re-enactors

Can a series of far-flung, high-level conferences bring peace to the Middle East by applying lessons from 17th-century Europe?

Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed (R) walks with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (C) as an Eritrean delegation arrives for peace talks with Ethiopia at the international airport in Addis Ababa on June 26, 2018.

Ethiopia and Eritrea Have a Common Enemy

Abiy Ahmed and Isaias Afwerki are racing toward peace because they both face the same threat: hard-liners in the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front.

Galleries

A soldier from the Democratic Republic of the Congo is seen at a military base outside Oicha on Oct. 7. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rocket malfunction in Kazakhstan, and a human tower in Spain.

Displaced Yemeni children from the Hodeidah province shelter in a damaged house on Sept. 30 where they have been living with other displaced families in the southwestern Yemeni city of Taez. The conflict has triggered what the U.N. describes as the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with three-quarters of the population, or 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid. (Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Displaced children in Yemen, farmer protests in New Delhi, and a return to Earth in Kazakhstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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