Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Released Taliban prisoners depart a government prison outside Kabul near Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on May 26.

As Cease-Fire Expires, Afghanistan Yearns for Peace

With new Taliban prisoner releases, the Afghan government hints at progress with peace talks.

A woman sits next to newborn babies who lost their mothers following an attack in a maternity hospital in Kabul on May 13.

Horrific Attack on Maternity Ward Threatens to Upend Afghan Truce

Kabul blames the Taliban for the killing of mothers and newborn babies but questions about the culprits remain.

Afghan security forces arrive at the site of a car bombing near Bagram Air Base in Parwan province, Afghanistan, on Dec. 11, 2019.

Is the Afghan Peace Deal Dead on Arrival?

The Trump administration’s push for an end to two decades of war may be slipping through its fingers.

Protesters at a vigil for murdered social leaders in Bogotá, Colombia, on July 6, 2018.

We Can Make the Post-Coronavirus World a Much Less Violent Place

The pandemic has decreased some kinds of crime and increased others. But the world is much safer than it used to be, and we know how to make it even safer.

Afghan Border Police officers guard an outpost in Nahr-e-Saraj, an oft-contested district in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Nov 20, 2019.

Waiting for Peace on the Front Lines

As political divisions hold up talks with the Taliban, Afghan forces are paying the price.

A Reaper drone used for missions in Afghanistan is seen in Nevada in 2009.

Death by Drone: America’s Vicious Legacy in Afghanistan

As the United States prepares to leave, thousands of killings remain unprobed, and Washington refuses to talk about them.

Security stands watch as a helicopter carries U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo back to his plane after meetings in Kabul, Afghanistan, on June 25, 2019.

Afghanistan’s Peace Deal Hangs in the Balance

Pompeo met with Afghan and Taliban leaders this week to salvage the fragile agreement. He came back empty-handed.

Galleries

Protesters—many of them armed—try to enter the Michigan House of Representatives chamber and are stopped by state police during a protest April 30 demanding that businesses be reopened. An “American Patriot Rally” organized by Michigan United for Liberty was held earlier in the day on the steps of the state Capitol in Lansing. JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images

The Week in World Photos

Global protests against government-imposed lockdowns, gang violence in El Salvador, and hat tips to medical staff.

Muslims offer prayers on April 23, the first night of Ramadan, in Bireuen, Indonesia. AMANDA JUFRIAN/AFP via Getty Images

The Week in World Photos

A prayerful start to Ramadan, medical workers on the front lines of a pandemic, and the annual Lyrids meteor shower.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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How to Save Global Capitalism From Itself

Decentralizing decision-making can help left-behind regions get back on track.

brexit-deglobalization-brian-stauffer-illustration

Britain’s Post-Brexit Identity Crisis

Boris Johnson has contradictory ideas for his country’s future—and no clear paths for getting there.

The Ugly End of Chimerica

The coronavirus pandemic has turned a conscious uncoupling into a messy breakup.

The 3 Most Polarizing Words in India

“Jai Shri Ram” was meant to be a celebration of a Hindu deity. But the phrase is turning into hate speech—and a dog whistle for attacks on Muslims.