Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

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Only Women Can Stop the Apocalypse

Men make nuclear weapons more dangerous. So why do they still dominate the field?

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with Jared Kushner on June 21, 2017 in Jerusalem.

Trump Must Not Let Jared Kushner’s Peace Plan See the Light of Day

Releasing a U.S. proposal that is bound to fail would legitimize Israeli annexation, give Saudi Arabia leverage, and strengthen Iran and its allies.

Participants arrive to attend a two-day gathering of the Taliban and Afghan opposition representatives at the President Hotel in Moscow on Feb. 5.

The Afghan Government Can’t Make Peace With the Taliban on Its Own

Negotiations involving a broad group that represents all of Afghanistan—not just its senior politicians—are the only way to achieve a lasting settlement.

A man wearing a Make Korea Great Again hat stands near conservative pro-U.S. demonstrators during a rally denouncing government policies toward North Korea in Seoul on March 1. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Failure in Hanoi Doesn’t Mean Peace Is Dead

The foundations need to be laid for a long, hard route ahead.

A soldier puts a flower on a grave in a cemetery for soldiers during the 60th anniversary of the '823 bombardment' in Kinmen, Taiwan on August 23, 2018.   (SAM YEH/AFP/Getty Images)

No Smiles Across the Taiwan Strait

Wars of words leave peace a long way off — and more aggression on the table.

Armed Houthi separatists brandish their weapons as they gather in the capital Sanaa on Dec. 13.   (Photo credit: Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Yemen’s Torment Finally Ending?

The latest cease-fire raises hopes, but officials fear war could break out again.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Galleries

Protesters clash with police during a demonstration outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12. ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Protesters in Hong Kong, students in Yemen, and self defense in India.

Argentinian activists with green handkerchiefs, which symbolize the abortion rights movement, demonstrate to mark the revival of their campaign to legalize abortion in Buenos Aires on May 28. EMILIANO LASALVIA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Abortion-rights demonstrators in Argentina, marriage in Taiwan, and flooding in the American Midwest.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Chinese workers construct a shopping mall at a retail and office complex, part of 
a Chinese-backed building boom in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in November 2018. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Catching China by the Belt (and Road)

How Washington can beat Beijing’s global influence campaign.

A poster released by the Alberta Department of Public Health circa 1948. (A17202b/Provincial Archives of Alberta)

How Alberta Won the Rat Race

One Canadian province has virtually eliminated its vermin—and shows how others can too.

The Spycraft Revolution

Changes in technology, politics, and business are all transforming espionage. Intelligence agencies must adapt—or risk irrelevance.

The Spies Who Came In From the Continent

How Brexit could spell the end of Britain’s famed advantage in intelligence.

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