Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Saudi Prince Khalid bin Salman

Can a Young Saudi Prince End the War in Yemen?

Khalid bin Salman is working full time to extricate Saudi Arabia from the disastrous conflict begun by his brother. Some regional and U.S. officials are cautiously optimistic. 

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listens before a meeting at the Palace Hotel during the 72nd United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 21, 2017.

What the United States Gets Wrong About Peace Talks

Even when the country wants a deal, at least four largely psychological impediments get in the way.

Bosnian women flee Jajce, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on Oct. 31, 1992.

For Bosnian Women, No Justice—and No Seats

In the Balkan wars, women were targets. In postwar governments, they’ve been pushed out of sight.

Former FARC commander Luciano Marín, who goes by Iván Márquez, appears in a video calling for a return to armed conflict in Colombia on Aug 29.

Call to Rearm Threatens Colombia’s Peace Process

A FARC faction goes back to war, an Iranian rocket fails to launch, and other stories we’re following today.

Local Afghan militia and Afghan Army soldiers consult March 14, 2007 in Kajaki, Helmand province, Afghanistan. Afghan troops, along with British Marine trainers, patrol through the area near the Kajaki hydroelectric dam.

How to Partner With the Taliban

The Trump administration’s peace deal for Afghanistan needs a plan for the country’s most looming threat: international terrorists whom both sides oppose.

A statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his dog Fala are seen at the FDR Memorial September 20, 2012 in Washington, DC.

There Once Was a President Who Hated War

American elites used to see war as a tragic necessity. Now they’re completely addicted to it.

Galleries

A Lebanese youth runs with a national flag as smoke billows from burning tires during a demonstration in Jal el-Dib area on the northern outskirts of Beirut on Jan. 14. JOSEPH EID/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Protests in Lebanon and Chile, cleanup in the Philippines and Puerto Rico, and impeachment in the United States.

Residents commute on a road through thick smoke from bushfires in Bemboka, in Australia's New South Wales state, on Jan. 5. SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images)

Otherworldly Photos of the Australian Bushfires

Deadly blazes have swept the country amid record heat, killing more than 20 people and millions of animals and leaving behind a charred, apocalyptic landscape.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Dan Saelinger illustration for Foreign Policy

Can Social Democrats Save the World (Again)?

Communism and democratic socialism won’t heal today’s political divisions. But social democracy—which helped ward off extremism following World War II—could.

socialism-why-it-wont-work-allison-schraeger-daniel-brokstad-illustration-foreign-policy-homepage

Why Socialism Won’t Work

Capitalism is still the best way to handle risk and boost innovation and productivity.

How Climate Change Has Supercharged the Left

Global warming could launch socialists to unprecedented power—and expose their movement’s deepest contradictions.

Why the Berlin Wall Still Matters

Fragments of the wall have become museum pieces. But with the rise of extremist parties in Germany, the debate over the barrier’s legacy is anything but history.