Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

A woman holds white balloons during a demonstration to demand the endorsement of the peace agreement between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in Bogota on Nov. 30. (Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Are the Key to Peace

Cease-fire negotiations that exclude them are more likely to fall apart. Here’s how the U.N. can boost their participation at the bargaining table.

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at the start of the second trilateral meeting with U.S. President Jimmy Carter at Camp David on Sept. 7, 1978. The talks led to the Camp David Accords.(Bettmann Archives via Getty Images)

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, chairs a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Sept. 17. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Can Nikki Haley Deliver One Last Time?

It’s not too late for Trump’s departing U.N. ambassador to cut Washington’s peacekeeping costs.

A Kosovar police officer walks past burning logs as Kosovo Albanians gather around a barricade blocking access to a village due to be visited by the Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, on the main road between Mitrovica, in the north of Kosovo, and the village of Banje, a Serbian enclave on Sept. 9.

Partition in Kosovo Will Lead to Disaster

Ill-advised land swaps and population transfers won’t bring peace. They’re more likely to revive the bloodshed that plagued the Balkans during the 1990s.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner meet with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) at the King David Hotel May 22, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel.

For Palestinians, America Was Never an Honest Broker

The Trump administration’s policies don’t represent a radical shift. The White House has simply abandoned the facade of neutrality and rubber-stamped the Israeli government’s agenda.

U.S. President Bill Clinton, center, prepares to give the opening address of the historic Israel-PLO Oslo Accords signing ceremony on Sept. 13, 1993 at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat at his side. (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

The Oslo Accords Are Dead, but There Is Still a Path to Peace

On the 25th anniversary of the landmark Israeli-Palestinian deal, activists and diplomats should focus on recreating the conditions that made it possible.

Sri Lankan women gather to demand peace talks between the government and Tamil Tiger rebels in Colombo on Dec. 10, 2004. (Sena Vidanagama/AFP/Getty Images)

Women Make Peace Stick

When only men sit at the negotiating table, cease-fires fall apart.

Galleries

A Palestinian woman walks into a room damaged by an Israeli airstrike earlier this week in the Gaza Strip on Nov. 14. A ceasefire held began after the worst escalation between Israel and Gaza militants since a 2014 war, but the situation remained volatile and the deal provoked sharp disagreement within the Israeli government. MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Destruction in Gaza, snow in Ukraine, and sun worshippers in India.

A voter observes election counting at the end of the first round of the presidential elections at a polling station in Antananarivo, Madagascar, on Nov. 7. (MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Election watching in Madagascar, World War I remembrance in London, and Diwali celebrations in India.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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