Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Cameroonians wait in line for food in a camp for internally displaced people in Kolofata, Cameroon, on Feb. 22, 2017.

Cameroon Must Make Concessions to End the Anglophone Crisis

President Paul Biya won’t get anywhere without engaging directly with separatist grievances.

Former FARC commander Luciano Marín, who goes by Iván Márquez, appears in a video calling for a return to armed conflict in Colombia on Aug 29.

How to Keep the Colombian Peace Deal Alive

In the wake of the announcement that a few ex-FARC commanders have rearmed, it's more important than ever for the government to uphold its development promises.

Former FARC commander Luciano Marín, who goes by Iván Márquez, appears in a video calling for a return to armed conflict in Colombia on Aug 29.

Call to Rearm Threatens Colombia’s Peace Process

A FARC faction goes back to war, an Iranian rocket fails to launch, and other stories we’re following today.

A member of the U.S. military visits Section 60 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, on May 24. Section 60 is the final resting place for U.S. soldiers killed in the United States' most recent wars, especially Iraq and Afghanistan.

Restraint Isn’t Isolationism—and It Won’t Endanger America

Critics of offshore balancing claim a more restrained U.S. foreign policy will breed insecurity. They’re wrong, and their arguments are easily debunked.

Palestinian demonstrators carry caricatures during a protest against the  U.S.-led peace plan in Ramallah on June 24.

Wedge Politics Won’t Bring Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Kushner’s plan aims to divide Palestinians from their leaders but fails to recognize that the people already resent their corrupt leadership—while failing to place any similar pressure on an Israeli prime minister under indictment.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt attend the opening session of a conference on the Middle East on Feb. 14, in Warsaw, Poland.

Don’t Dismiss the Bahrain Conference. It Can Help Palestinians.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt’s peace plan may not be the deal of the century, but there are interim steps that U.S. officials and Arab leaders could take to help stabilize the West Bank and Gaza.

Galleries

Migrants wait to board in a bus as they transfer to a camp following a rescue operation by a Frontex patrol vessel at the port of Skala Sikamias on the Greek island of Lesbos on Oct. 2. ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Migrants in Greece, an election in Kosovo, and protests in Iraq, Ecuador, and Hong Kong.

A woman carries posters of presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah, Afghanistan's current chief executive officer, ahead of the presidential elections in Herat, Afghanistan on Sept. 23. HOSHANG HASHIMI/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Elections in Afghanistan, testimony in Washington, and a people’s party in China.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Lower Manhattan in New York City on Oct. 30, 2012, after Hurricane Sandy. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Why Central Banks Need to Step Up on Global Warming

A decade after the world bailed out finance, it’s time for finance to bail out the world.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Can ‘Supercharged’ Plants Solve the Climate Crisis?

Crops already suck up a lot of carbon dioxide. One scientist thinks they can do much more.

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.