Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Former FARC commander Luciano Marín, who goes by Iván Márquez, appears in a video calling for a return to armed conflict in Colombia on Aug 29.

Call to Rearm Threatens Colombia’s Peace Process

A FARC faction goes back to war, an Iranian rocket fails to launch, and other stories we’re following today.

Local Afghan militia and Afghan Army soldiers consult March 14, 2007 in Kajaki, Helmand province, Afghanistan. Afghan troops, along with British Marine trainers, patrol through the area near the Kajaki hydroelectric dam.

How to Partner With the Taliban

The Trump administration’s peace deal for Afghanistan needs a plan for the country’s most looming threat: international terrorists whom both sides oppose.

A statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his dog Fala are seen at the FDR Memorial September 20, 2012 in Washington, DC.

There Once Was a President Who Hated War

American elites used to see war as a tragic necessity. Now they’re completely addicted to it.

Palestinian demonstrators carry caricatures during a protest against the  U.S.-led peace plan in Ramallah on June 24.

Wedge Politics Won’t Bring Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Kushner’s plan aims to divide Palestinians from their leaders but fails to recognize that the people already resent their corrupt leadership—while failing to place any similar pressure on an Israeli prime minister under indictment.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt attend the opening session of a conference on the Middle East on Feb. 14, in Warsaw, Poland.

Don’t Dismiss the Bahrain Conference. It Can Help Palestinians.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt’s peace plan may not be the deal of the century, but there are interim steps that U.S. officials and Arab leaders could take to help stabilize the West Bank and Gaza.

Foreign Policy illustration

Only Women Can Stop the Apocalypse

Men make nuclear weapons more dangerous. So why do they still dominate the field?

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with Jared Kushner on June 21, 2017 in Jerusalem.

Trump Must Not Let Jared Kushner’s Peace Plan See the Light of Day

Releasing a U.S. proposal that is bound to fail would legitimize Israeli annexation, give Saudi Arabia leverage, and strengthen Iran and its allies.

Galleries

Lesotho's Mokhesi Tlholohelo, in blue, and South Sudan's Hal Hal compete during the men's light boxing competition in the African Games in Rabat, Morocco, on Aug. 21. FADEL SENNA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

A lockdown in Kashmir, a movement in Hong Kong, and flowers from Russian President Vladimir Putin in France.

A Hong Kong policeman falls backward during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters during ongoing demonstrations at Hong Kong's International Airport on Aug. 13. MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Conflict in Hong Kong, a lockdown in Kashmir, and wildfires in Indonesia and Greece.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Lower Manhattan in New York City on Oct. 30, 2012, after Hurricane Sandy. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Why Central Banks Need to Step Up on Global Warming

A decade after the world bailed out finance, it’s time for finance to bail out the world.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Can ‘Supercharged’ Plants Solve the Climate Crisis?

Crops already suck up a lot of carbon dioxide. One scientist thinks they can do much more.

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