Shadow Gov’t

About Shadow Government

Shadow Government is a blog about U.S. foreign policy in the age of Trump, written by experienced policymakers, scholars, and practitioners from the loyal Democrat opposition. It is co-edited by Derek Chollet, Colin Kahl, and Julie Smith.

Meet the contributors 

A trompe l’oeil shows two workers painting the European Union flag on the side of a building in Paris on May 23.

Europe Is Back

Long deemed strategically irrelevant by the United States, the EU is poised to become a major geopolitical power. Washington should take note.

Saudi Minister of State Mohammed al-Shaikh arrives for the second day of a U.S.-sponsored Middle East economic conference in Bahrain on June 26.

Gulf-Israel Ties Might Not Survive Trump’s Peace Plan

A political program that does not envision statehood for the Palestinians could reverse the Gulf Arab states’ tentative warming toward Israel.

The stage for the first U.S. Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, on June 26,

Democrats Face a Defense Spending Conundrum

The U.S. foreign-policy establishment shouldn’t balk at pledges to roll back national security commitments.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Dec. 4, 2013.

How Democrats Can Get Tough on China—Without Imitating Trump

The current White House has legitimate concerns but counterproductive solutions.

U.S. President Donald Trump announces his intention to pull out of the Paris climate agreement, outside the White House on June 1, 2017.

Leaving the Paris Agreement Is a Bad Deal for the United States

Trump’s plan to quit the accord would provide serious cover for major emitters like China and India.

Galleries

A Hong Kong policeman falls backward during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters during ongoing demonstrations at Hong Kong's International Airport on Aug. 13. MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Conflict in Hong Kong, a lockdown in Kashmir, and wildfires in Indonesia and Greece.

Riot police officers detain a protester during an unauthorized rally demanding that independent and opposition candidates be allowed to run for office in local elections in September, at Moscow's Trubnaya Square on July 27. KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Floods in India and Pakistan, a symbolic sculpture in Syria, and protests in Moscow, Hong Kong, and Khartoum.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Lower Manhattan in New York City on Oct. 30, 2012, after Hurricane Sandy. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Why Central Banks Need to Step Up on Global Warming

A decade after the world bailed out finance, it’s time for finance to bail out the world.

CK: No caption, but leave a space in caption field to ensure it works right! NASA via Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Space Research Can Save the Planet—Again

The solutions to climate change lie far, far away.

Democracy Is the Planet’s Biggest Enemy

Young people care a lot about climate change—but most of them can’t vote. Here’s how governments can adapt to accommodate them.

Can ‘Supercharged’ Plants Solve the Climate Crisis?

Crops already suck up a lot of carbon dioxide. One scientist thinks they can do much more.

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