South Asia

About South Asia Channel

The South Asia Channel, a collaboration with New America and Johns Hopkins SAIS, features deep analysis of issues concerning Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, and covers everything from politics to business to culture.

Editor, Peter Bergen
Assistant Editor, David Sterman

A resident looks at a damaged home and shops following clashes in New Delhi on Feb. 26.

Uneasy Calm in Delhi After Days of Riots

More than 20 people have died in violence that began with protests over India’s controversial citizenship law.

Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah (center) arrives at a news conference after the announcement of the final presidential election results in Kabul on Feb. 18.

With Taliban Talks Soon to Start, Afghan Government Splits Apart

The Taliban gloat as Afghanistan’s chief executive refuses to accept the election outcome and vows to form his own “inclusive government.”

Left: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive at Hyderabad House in New Delhi on Feb. 25. Right: Police try to stop protesters during violent clashes between at Jaffarabad in New Delhi on Feb. 24.

How Trump’s Trade Strategy Met Its Match in India

The U.S. president departs New Delhi without delivering on an “incredible” trade deal despite years of high-level negotiations.

A demonstrator against India's new citizenship law

India’s Muslims Are Terrified of Being Deported

Many Indians lack the documents needed to prove citizenship—and Muslims are in the firing line.

Demonstrators hold placards and wave Indian flags.

India’s Economic Troubles Are Rooted in Politics

Economic models often fail to account for hidden assumptions. Ignoring the importance of trust and belonging in society may be hurting New Delhi more than policymakers understand.

Soldiers lift a coffin into a van during the dignified transfer of two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan

Why Afghanistan Is America’s Greatest Strategic Disaster

Pompeo's plan to make peace with the resurgent Taliban is a sad reminder of all that went wrong in Afghanistan—and how it could have been otherwise.

The Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai poses for a photograph at the all-boys Cadet College Swat in Gulibagh, near Mingora, Pakistan, on March 31, 2018.

Pakistan’s Success Story

How Swat Valley went from basket case to on the mend.

Galleries

A group of migrants travel on board a rescue boat on Feb. 10, one day after their rescue off the Libyan coast. Ninety-three migrants from Mali, Ivory Coast, and Cameroon were rescued by the Spanish NGO Maydayterraneo in the central Mediterranean. PABLO GARCIA/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Migrants in the Mediterranean, a mass masked wedding in South Korea, and a melting glacier in the French Alps.

People in traditional Korean hanbok dresses wear face masks as they jump for a souvenir picture at Gyeongbokgung palace in Seoul on Feb. 3. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Rebel fighters in Syria, protesters at the U.S.-Mexico border, and migrants in Greece.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Dan Saelinger illustration for Foreign Policy

Can Social Democrats Save the World (Again)?

Communism and democratic socialism won’t heal today’s political divisions. But social democracy—which helped ward off extremism following World War II—could.

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Why Socialism Won’t Work

Capitalism is still the best way to handle risk and boost innovation and productivity.

How Climate Change Has Supercharged the Left

Global warming could launch socialists to unprecedented power—and expose their movement’s deepest contradictions.

Why the Berlin Wall Still Matters

Fragments of the wall have become museum pieces. But with the rise of extremist parties in Germany, the debate over the barrier’s legacy is anything but history.