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Heat of the Moment an FP Studios podcast, in partnership with the Climate Investment Funds

How Debt Relief Can Help Developing Countries Go Green

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Blue Bonds for a greener ocean.

At this year’s United Nations climate change conference in Glasgow, Scotland, developing countries were clear: Wealthier nations need to do more to help finance the world’s movement away from fossil fuels. Their argument is gaining traction. Debt is holding countries back from adapting to climate change.

Leading off this episode of Heat of the Moment, we hear from Mamadou Honadia, one of the lead climate negotiators for Burkina Faso, who shares how his countrys response to the climate crisis has been stymied by debt. We then hear from Julie Robinson, program director of the Nature Conservancy in Belize, on an innovative new debt-restructuring program called a Blue Bonds program, which will help Belize protect its oceans and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

About Heat of the Moment:  The climate change crisis can feel so formidable, so daunting, that instead of mobilizing people to action, it engenders paralysis. What could we mortals possibly do to prevent the calamity? A fair bit, it turns out. On Heat of the Moment, a 10-part podcast by FP Studios, in partnership with the Climate Investment Funds, we focus on ordinary people across the globe who have found ways to fight back.  Hosted by CNN contributor John D. Sutter, Heat of the Moment tells the stories of the people on the front lines of the fight against climate change.  See All Episodes

More Heat of the Moment episodes:

Youth Climate Activists Are Suing Big Oil—and Winning

Youth activists in the Netherlands joined lawsuit against Shell as part of a new strategy to hold fossil energy companies accountable for unsustainable carbon dioxide emissions.

The Godmother of Climate Security

Why the U.S. military is a key player in solving the climate crisis.

Climate Migrants: Destination Duluth

We are in the midst of one of the greatest moments of human migration in recent history. Wars and unrest in the Middle East, political tensions in Latin America, and ethnic clashes in places like Myanmar have caused millions of people to flee their homes looking for safety and security for themselves and their families. But there’s also another set of migrants: those who are fleeing because they’ve determined their homes are no longer safe from the massive forces of climate change. Today’s story involves someone who never expected to see herself as a climate migrant. In fact, as director of a climate-solution organization, Jamie Beck Alexander would often spend countless hours trying to help others in far-off places deal with the effects of climate change. But then a few years back, she realized her own living situation in California was no longer going to work.

Other Foreign Policy podcasts:

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Global Reboot

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Ones and Tooze

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