slideshow

Then-Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping unveils the plaque at the opening of Australia's first Chinese Medicine Confucius Institute.

Chinese Propaganda Has No Place on Campus

Universities can’t handle Confucius Institutes responsibly. The state should step in.

U.S. President Donald Trump (from left), Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and China's President Xi Jinping attend a meeting at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

Trump Is Beijing’s Best Asset

Chinese officials want the U.S. president reelected—because he’s so weak.

Members of the German military wait to have their suits decontaminated after a search for dead birds in northern Germany, where swans infected with bird flu were found, on Feb. 22, 2006.

The Presidential Candidates Are Ignoring the World’s Biggest Looming Threat

Whoever sits in the White House come 2021 will likely have to confront a pandemic of some kind. He or she should start preparing now.

The United Nations emblem is seen in front of the United Nations Office in Geneva on June 8, 2008.

The End of Latin American Solidarity

The region once acted as a bloc in world affairs. But as Costa Rica’s bid to join the U.N. Human Rights Council shows, Venezuela’s ongoing disintegration is ripping it apart.

Yemeni supporters of the Houthi movement rally in Sanaa.

How to End the War in Yemen

Since the September attack on Saudi oil facilities, Riyadh and the Houthis have taken a step back from all-out war. All parties, including the United States, should seize this rare opportunity to resolve the conflict.

A Syrian Democratic Forces mortar team targets the Islamic State near Deir Ezzor, Syria.

Kurdish Fighters Mount Counterattack Using Network of Tunnels

The Syrian Democratic Forces have recaptured some territory from Turkish-backed forces.

A Syrian woman walks with a boy past a banner showing Russian President Vladimir Putin shaking hands with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, after arriving in a convoy carrying displaced people into government-controlled territory at Abu al-Zuhur checkpoint in the western countryside of Idlib province, on June 1, 2018.

The United States Still Needs a Syria Strategy

Leaving the refugee crisis unresolved while legitimizing the brutal Assad regime will only do further harm to U.S. interests in the Middle East.

us-woman-foreign-policy-her-power-index-top

The Her Power Index

How the U.S. government is failing women in foreign policy.

Turkey-backed Syrian fighters gather around a tank in the outskirts of Manbij near the Turkish border on Oct. 14 in northeastern Syria.

Turkey Faces Sanctions Over Syria Incursion

Plus: Police officers killed in Mexico, Mozambique heads to the polls, and the other stories we’re following today.

President Donald Trump speaks to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

Trump’s Weak Sanctions May Only Help Erdogan

Despite his vow to “destroy” Turkey’s economy, the U.S. president could help its leader escape the wrath of Congress.

Scottish National Party Member of Parliament Ian Blackford joins celebrations marking five years since Scotland's independence referendum.

Scotland Could Leave the United Kingdom Over Brexit—and Green Energy

The debate over how to best marshal the country's alternative energy sources may affect a new independence referendum.

Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran meets U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

The Secret Origins of the U.S.-Kurdish Relationship Explain Today’s Disaster

The seeds of Washington’s abandonment of the Kurds traces back to a classified document written in the 1970s by Henry Kissinger.

The Citgo gas station logo in Middletown, Delaware, on July 26.

If Citgo Is Lost, Maduro Will Win

If Maduro hands the refining company over to his creditors, it would be bad news for the opposition—and the United States.

Indian school students form the Chinese characters for the name of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The Leaders of the World’s Two Biggest Countries Meet—and Come Away With Little Progress

Flashy summits between Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi don’t achieve much because India has a weaker set of cards than China. To change the game, New Delhi needs to hew closer to Washington.

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