RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by his godmother Sinthia on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Condemned to Life in Zikaland

Recife, Brazil, was called the epicenter of the Zika virus outbreak. Now, doctors and parents there must learn how to care for the town’s 1-year-olds — including Juan, David, Davi, and Joao — who were born with microcephaly.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Flavia Duran at a clinic on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on Dec. 4, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Flavia Duran at a clinic in Recife on Dec. 12.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by his godmother Sinthia while receiving a bandage treatment on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro is held by his godmother Sinthia while receiving a bandage treatment on Dec. 12.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned one-year-old on December 4, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Flavia Duran at a clinic on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one-year-old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition "Congenital Zika Syndrome". Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment on Dec. 12.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 14:  Davi Lucas, who was born with microcephaly, is held by his mother Eliane during a clinic visit on December 14, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies born with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many suffer a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Davi Lucas, who was born with microcephaly, is held by his mother, Eliane, during a clinic visit on Dec. 14 in Recife.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 13:  Joao Guilherme, who has microcephaly and turned one-year-old on October 28, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Karen Maciel at a clinic on December 13, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one-year-old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Joao Guilherme, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on Oct. 28, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment from Dr. Karen Maciel at a clinic in Recife on Dec. 13.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 13:  David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly, is held by his mother Mylene as she speaks on the phone on December 13, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies born with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many suffer a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly, is held by his mother, Mylene, as she speaks on the phone in Recife on Dec. 13.

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by Dr. Pepita Duran in the Pepita Duran clinic on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro, who turned 1 year old on Dec. 4, is held by Dr. Pepita Duran at her clinic in Recife on Dec. 12.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by his godmother Sinthia on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, is held by his godmother Sinthia on Dec. 12.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 13:  Joao Guilherme, who has microcephaly and turned one-year-old on October 28, receives a physiotherapy treatment from Dr. Pepita Duran in the Pepita Duran clinic on December 13, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one-year-old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Joao Guilherme receives a physiotherapy treatment from Dr. Pepita Duran on Dec. 13 in Recife.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, sits in a specially designed chair to keep him upright with his sister Jennifer Karine on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro sits next to his sister Jennifer Karine in a specially designed chair to keep him upright on Dec. 12 in Recife.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by Dr. Pepita Duran in the Pepita Duran clinic on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro is held by Dr. Pepita Duran on Dec. 12.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Flavia Duran at a clinic on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Juan Pedro receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment at a clinic in Recife on Dec. 12.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 13:  David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly, is held by his mother Mylene during a clinic visit on December 13, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies born with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many suffer a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

David Henrique Ferreira is held by his mother, Mylene, during a clinic visit on Dec. 13.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 13:  Joao Guilherme, who has microcephaly and turned one-year-old on October 28, receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment with Dr. Karen Maciel at a clinic on December 13, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one-year-old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Joao Guilherme receives aquatic physiotherapy treatment from Dr. Karen Maciel at a clinic in Recife on Dec. 13.

MARIO TAMA/Getty Images
RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 15:  David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly, is held his grandfather Severino in their home on December 15, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. The family constantly attempts a slew of methods to stimulate and play with David. As many of the babies born with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn one year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many suffer a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as Ôcongenital Zika syndromeÕ. Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

David Henrique Ferreira is held by his grandfather Severino in their home in Recife on Dec. 15.

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