Previous generations of Chinese leadership did not always so thoroughly eschew accessorizing. Some, such as Wu Bangguo, the second-ranking official on the Standing Committee (and due to step down this week), favored the huge square glasses that have had somewhat of a rebirth among young Chinese hipsters today.      Above, Wu in 2011.

Fashion Tips from the Politburo

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       Previous generations of Chinese leadership did not always so thoroughly eschew accessorizing. Some, such as Wu Bangguo, the second-ranking official on the Standing Committee (and due to step down this week), favored the huge square glasses that have had somewhat of a rebirth among young Chinese hipsters today.      Above, Wu in 2011.

 

Previous generations of Chinese leadership did not always so thoroughly eschew accessorizing. Some, such as Wu Bangguo, the second-ranking official on the Standing Committee (and due to step down this week), favored the huge square glasses that have had somewhat of a rebirth among young Chinese hipsters today.

Above, Wu in 2011.

       Li Peng, the leader most associated with the Tiananmen massacre, also shared Wu's penchant for sizeable browed eyewear. Above, Li in 1988.

 

Li Peng, the leader most associated with the Tiananmen massacre, also shared Wu's penchant for sizeable browed eyewear. Above, Li in 1988.

       But perhaps most memorable are the enormous tortoise-shell glasses of former President Jiang Zemin (right). When he retired in 2002, Chinese presidential eyewear was scaled-back: though outgoing President Hu Jintao wears large specs himself, they're a less visible wire frame. Above, Hu and Jiang at the opening session of the 18th Congress.

 

But perhaps most memorable are the enormous tortoise-shell glasses of former President Jiang Zemin (right). When he retired in 2002, Chinese presidential eyewear was scaled-back: though outgoing President Hu Jintao wears large specs himself, they're a less visible wire frame. Above, Hu and Jiang at the opening session of the 18th Congress.

       Now-disgraced Chongqing Party Secretary Bo Xilai favored well-cut suits and stylish ties that made him stand out against the boring backdrop of his colleagues. Bo would eventually fall out of favor in spectacular fashion -- no pun intended. Above, Bo Xilai at a press conference in 2005.

 

Now-disgraced Chongqing Party Secretary Bo Xilai favored well-cut suits and stylish ties that made him stand out against the boring backdrop of his colleagues. Bo would eventually fall out of favor in spectacular fashion -- no pun intended. Above, Bo Xilai at a press conference in 2005.

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