Afghan Taliban

Ismail Khan, 14, at the juvenile rehabilitation center in Kabul on Aug. 11. He was caught during an operation to carry ammunition for Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, which he joined after his parent and sister were killed by rocket fire in 2014.

Afghanistan Is Trying to Save Its Child Bombers

In a Kabul clinic, staff struggle to help teenagers drafted by the Taliban.

Pakistani opposition leader Imran Khan (C) gestures from the stage during a by-election campaign event in Karachi on April 9, 2015. (RIZWAN TABASSUM/AFP/Getty Images)

Imran Khan Can’t Fix Pakistan’s Foreign Policy

The fiery electoral front-runner will be hemmed in on all sides if he wins.

Sikh community leader Rawail Singh lights the Diwali lamps with his daughter Komal on Oct. 18, 2017, in Kabul. (Ruchi Kumar for Foreign Policy)

‘We Belong to Afghanistan’

Rawail Singh believed in a peaceful future for Sikhs like him in his homeland — and died for it.

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Watchdog: United States Made Corruption in Afghanistan ‘Pervasive and Entrenched’

Billions of dollar the U.S. sent to Afghanistan made it a much more corrupt place.

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Reports: American University Of Afghanistan Under Attack

There are multiple reports of gunfire and explosions at the school.

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Watchdog Chief: Corruption Is An ‘Existential’ Threat to U.S. Efforts in Afghanistan

The watchdog for the Afghan war warns graft there could undermine the entire U.S. effort.

VENICE, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 6: (EDITORS NOTE: Image has been digitally altered) Director Tobias Lindholm is photographed for Self Assignment on September 6, 2015 in Venice, Italy. (Photo by Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

An FP Conversation: What Qualifies as War Crimes in the 21st Century?

Foreign Policy spoke with Oscar-nominated filmmaker Tobias Lindholm about war crimes in the 21st century, and who is responsible for them.

An Afghan security official holds his weapon ready as he walks next to the site of a suicide attack on the Afghan parliament building in Kabul on June 22, 2015. Taliban militants attacked the Afghan parliament on June 22, with gunfire and explosions rocking the building, sending lawmakers running for cover in chaotic scenes relayed live on television.The insurgents tried to storm the complex after triggering a car bomb but were repelled and have taken position in a partially-constructed building nearby, officials said about the ongoing attack. All MPs were safely evacuated after the attack, which came as the Afghan president's nominee for the crucial post of defence minister was to be introduced in parliament. AFP PHOTO / Wakil Kohsar        (Photo credit should read WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Mapped: The Taliban Surged in 2015, but ISIS Is Moving In on Its Turf

The U.S. drawdown has paved the way for the Taliban to brush aside Afghanistan’s security forces and take control of growing swaths of the country.

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Bergdahl to Be Court-Martialed for Desertion and Could Face Life in Prison

Bowe Bergdahl is to be court-martialed for deserting his post in Afghanistan.

WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01:   House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-TX) (C) delivers opening remarks during a hearing in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill December 1, 2015 in Washington, DC. Defense Secretary Ashton Carter and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr. testified before the committee about the U.S. strategy to combat the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS, in Syria and Iraq and its implications for the greater Middle East.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

House Republicans: Bergdahl Swap ‘Violated Several Laws’

Report on the 2014 prisoner swap elicits a strong response from Democrats.

TO GO WITH AFGHANISTAN-US-ARMY-CONFLICT-FOCUS BY GUILLAUME DECAMME
In this photograph taken on August 13, 2015, US army and Afghan National Army (ANA) soldiers walk as a NATO helicopter flies overhead at coalition force Forward Operating Base (FOB) Connelly in the Khogyani district in the eastern province of Nangarhar. From his watchtower in insurgency-wracked eastern Afghanistan, US army Specialist Josh Whitten doesn't have much to say about his Afghan colleagues. "They don't come up here anymore, because they used to mess around with our stuff. "Welcome to Forward Operating Base Connelly, where US troops are providing training and tactical advice to the 201st Afghan army corps as they take on the Taliban on the battlefield. AFP PHOTO / Wakil Kohsar        (Photo credit should read WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Obama, Dropping Pledge, to Keep Thousands of Troops in Afghanistan After 2016

Some 5,500 U.S. forces will remain in country to train the Afghan army and fight the Taliban, al Qaeda, and the Islamic State.

Pakistan members of Jamiat Nazriati party shout slogans in a rally to pay tribute to Afghanistan's deceased Taliban chief Mullah Omar, in Quetta on August 2, 2015. New Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour called for unity in the movement August 1, in his first audio message since becoming head of the group that faces deepening splits following the death of longtime chief Mullah Omar. AFP PHOTO / Banaras KHAN        (Photo credit should read BANARAS KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Afghan Taliban: Yes, We Did Cover Up Mullah Omar’s Death

Amid leadership struggle, Taliban leader's supporters back his experience.

Afghan police and security forces inspect the site of a car bomb in Kabul on August 22, 2015. A suicide car bomb apparently targeting a foreign forces convoy killed three people in downtown Kabul on August 22, officials said, underlining the precarious security situation in the Afghan capital following a recent wave of fatal bombings. AFP PHOTO / WAKIL KOHSAR        (Photo credit should read WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Afghanistan, Choose Your Enemies Wisely

The Taliban’s new leadership may be the last decent opportunity for a political solution to the conflict. Without one, the Islamic State will make Afghanistan the next Iraq or Syria.

TO GO WITH Afghanistan-unrest-militias,FOCUS by Anuj Chopra
This photograph taken on May 23, 2015, shows Afghan militia forces stand with their weapons in Kunduz. The commander known as Pakhsaparan, or the "wall breaker", barked out commands at his bandolier-draped fighters, part of a patchwork of anti-Taliban militias in northern Afghanistan seeking to augment hard-pressed Afghan forces in a strategy fraught with risk. AFP PHOTO / SHAH Marai        (Photo credit should read SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images)

Death Divides the Taliban

The death of Mullah Omar has caused rifts in succession, the peace process, and internal loyalties that signal dangerous times ahead for Afghanistan.

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Singing Omar’s Praises, Staying Silent on Mansour

Al Qaeda affiliates' silence is a sign that the fight to succeed Mullah Omar as Taliban leader is not yet over.

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China’s Man in the Taliban

Why the death of Mullah Omar is bad news for Beijing.

KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN:  TV grabs taken secretly by BBC Newsnight shows Taliban's one-eyed spiritual leader Mullah Mohammed Omar (C) during a rally of his troops in Kandahar before their victorious assault on Kabul in 1996. AFP PHOTO            MANDATORY CREDIT BBC NEWS/NEWSNIGHT (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)

Could Mullah Omar’s Death Help the Peace Process?

Why would Kabul announce the death of Mullah Omar at such a critical point in the peace process?

ALGIERS, ALGERIA - OCTOBER 28:  A man reads 28 October 2001 in Algiers the Algerian daily El Youm, with on its frontpage a picture presented by the newspaper as a portrait of Mullah Mohammed Omar. The leader of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban regime Mullah Mohammed Omar said in an interview with El Youm that the "real war" against the United States has not yet begun, and promised to give the US a "bitter lesson". AFP PHOTO HOCINE  (Photo credit should read HOCINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Who’s in Charge of the Taliban?

The newest round of rumors over Mullah Omar’s demise is spreading like wildfire. And if Omar really is dead, understanding Akhtar Mansour -- arguably the Taliban’s number two man -- is vital for the upcoming peace talks.

TO GO WITH Lifestyle-Pakistan-unrest-tourism,FEATURE by Sajjad Qayyum
In this photograph taken on June 9, 2013, shows a view of tourist huts in the mountainous Neelum valley in Pakistani controlled Kashmir. Success stories can be rare in Pakistan, but business is booming in a new holiday resort in Kashmir as the region rebuilds after a devastating earthquake and shrugs off associations with violence. AFP PHOTO / SAJJAD QAYYUM        (Photo credit should read SAJJAD QAYYUM/AFP/Getty Images)

The Camp David of Pakistan

Peace talks in Murree, Pakistan between Afghanistan and the Afghan Taliban may be a first tentative step, but they are the only step that can lead towards peace in Afghanistan.

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