Africa

U.S. President Donald Trump visits China.

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African nations are fighting to repatriate their artifacts, Washington imposes sanctions on a Chinese paramilitary group, and the United States has a new opportunity to rethink its visa policies.

Activists and others gather outside the Roodepoort Magistrate’s Court in Johannesburg on June 24.

After Lockdown, Femicide Rises in South Africa

Pandemic measures focus anger on crimes against women.

Hundreds of thousands of historical artworks from Africa remain outside the continent, including (clockwise from top left): an Oduduwa helmet mask made of bronze from Benin City in Nigeria, housed at the British Museum in London; the “Royal Seat of the Kingdom of Dahomey” from Benin Republic, at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris; an ivory receptacle with figurative relief and stopper from the Loango coast, part of modern-day Republic of Congo, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; a Central African power figure from the coast of Congo and Angola, now at the Met; a Mbangu mask from southern Bandundu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, housed at the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren, Belgium; a head of a royal ancestor from the former Benin Kingdom, a part of modern-day Nigeria, displayed at the Quai Branly; and a carved ivory pendant mask of Queen Idia, inlaid with iron and bronze, from Benin Kingdom, now at the British Museum.

Is It Time to Repatriate Africa’s Looted Art?

Protests have strengthened calls for Western institutions to repatriate priceless cultural artifacts. Museums in Africa are ready to receive them.

The construction of an Ethiopian dam on the Nile river is seen.

Trump Mulls Withholding Aid to Ethiopia Over Controversial Dam

The massive Ethiopian dam is a flash point for tensions in Africa—and is now sowing confusion and discord within the U.S. government, with many officials concerned Washington is too much in Egypt’s corner.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi leaves after a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

IMF Loans Will Further Entrench Corruption in Egypt

Recently disbursed IMF funding will only help the Sisi regime and entrench its rule.

A lab technician works in Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on Nov. 3, 2014.

How Canadian Bureaucracy Botched a Critical Ebola Treatment

A Chinese Canadian researcher’s breakthrough could have saved thousands of lives.

Nairobi, Kenya, which has seen rapid economic expansion in recent years, is seen through a crisscross of electrical lines on May 16, 2019.

Kenya’s Road to Dictatorship Runs Through Nairobi County

The handover of municipal services to military officers makes clear how the president wants to wield power.

Economic Freedom Fighters supporters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, on June 8 in solidarity with the global Black Lives Matter movement.

The Legacy of American Racism at Home and Abroad

Domestic racism has long impacted U.S. foreign policy. It’s time to open up about it.

A Nigerian police officer

As the World Marches for American Victims, Police Brutality in Africa Goes Unnoticed

A spate of killings in Nigeria under lockdown has produced little but hashtag activism.

Burundi's national flag is set at half-mast at the state house as Burundi mourns the death of Burundian President Pierre Nkurunziza, in Bujumbura on June 10.

Will Burundi’s New President Seize the Moment?

The sudden death of the outgoing president, the coronavirus pandemic, and an ailing economy mean that wide-ranging reforms are needed more than ever.

People wait in line to vote on June 9, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia.

To Save Its Democracy, the United States Needs a Dose of Its Own Medicine

Americans have long worked abroad to promote democratic practices and institutions. Now, more than ever, those lessons must be applied at home.

Members of the Nigerian and U.S. military stand next to some of the 24 armored vehicles donated to the Nigerian government in Lagos on Jan. 7, 2016.

America’s Disdain for Black Lives Extends to Africa

Increased militarization on the continent under Trump is part of a long history of institutionalized racism in U.S. foreign policy.

Indian Malaria Fumigation

Malaria May Still Be 2020’s Biggest Killer

The coronavirus has shut down large-scale treatment and prevention programs around the globe, which could send malaria deaths skyrocketing this year.

City of Tshwane health officials are seen during a testing drive for COVID-19 at the Bloed Street Mall in Pretoria Central Business District on June 11.

In South Africa, Racial Tensions Simmer Amid a Pandemic

A swift government response has kept the coronavirus at bay, for now, but stark inequalities, heavy-handed security forces, and racist rhetoric are threatening the country’s hard-won unity.

Children gather in Bangui, Central African Republic

Child Soldiers Are Helping End a Forever War

Children are at the center of the Central African Republic’s efforts to fight the coronavirus pandemic—and to break the country’s cycles of violence.

Protesters face police in Minneapolis.

African Leaders, Joined by U.S. Embassies, Condemn Police Killing in Minneapolis

In highly unusual move, U.S. diplomats in Uganda and Kenya issue public pronouncements expressing distress over the death of George Floyd.

Kenya Face Shields

If African Governments Won’t Act, the People Will

With frustration rising over haphazard responses to the coronavirus, community networks are filling the void across the continent.

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