Africa

Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Bishoftu, Ethiopia on Oct. 1, 2017. (Zacharias Abubeker/AFP/Getty Images)

Ethiopia’s Great Rift

Will a power struggle within the ruling party lead to reform — or more repression?

South African President Jacob Zuma wipes his face with his hand as he answers hostile questions at the South African parliament in Cape Town on August 6, 2015.

Zuma Has Fallen

South Africa's president weathered scandal after scandal while driving his country’s economy and reputation into the ground. His luck has finally run out.

A man collects drinking water from taps in Cape Town, South Africa, on May 15, 2017. (Rodger Bosch/AFP/Getty Images)

What Happens When a Major World City Runs Dry?

As Cape Town counts down to Day Zero, South Africans worry about severe unrest and outbreaks of disease.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway during an interview at the White House on Aug. 3, 2017. (Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)

African Ambassadors Express Disappointment After Meeting with Kellyanne Conway

When the president's advisor didn't discuss Africa, some participants were confused.

African leaders and U.S. President Donald Trump pose during the G-7 Summit on May 27, 2017 in Taormina, Sicily. (Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images)

American Sh*thole

The biggest problem with many African countries is that they're led by men like Trump.

U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe Harry K. Thomas Jr. in his Harare office on Dec. 7, 2017. (Cynthia Matonhodze for Foreign Policy)

An Emissary to Tyranny

Serving as a U.S. diplomat in Zimbabwe is tough. Life for African-American diplomats there is even harder.

President Donald Trump attends a luncheon with U.S. and African leaders at the 72nd United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 20, 2017 in New York. (Brendan Smialowski      /AFP/Getty Images)

African Ambassadors to Convene in Wake of Trump’s ‘Shithole’ Outburst

U.S. diplomats worry the president’s comments will set back relations. Others wonder why it took the “shithole” comment to get Washington to finally notice Africa.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, currently under construction, on May 15, 2016.  (DigitalGlobe via Getty Images)

Egypt-Sudan Spat Muddies Prospects for Deal on Big Nile Dam

Talks are stalled over how to deal with the impact of a $5 billion dam that could threaten Egypt’s lifeblood.

Oromo protesters demonstrate in the Ethiopian town of Bishoftu on October 1. (Zacharias Abubeker/AFP/Getty Images)

Ethiopia Is Falling Apart

Tepid reforms and halfhearted concessions won't save the country's authoritarian government from its existential crisis.

Protesters in the Zimbabwean capital of Harare cheer a military vehicle during a demonstration demanding President Robert Mugabe's resignation on Nov. 18. (Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images)

Africa’s Generational War

Last year was a good one for the continent’s autocrats. But young Africans have launched a democratic revolution — and they’ve got the numbers on their side.

Migrants rest at a detention center in the Libyan city of Zawiyah on June 17. (Taha Jawashi/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Is Shocked — Shocked — By Libya’s Slave Markets

The continent is finally admitting what it has known all along: that its migration policies are complicit in crimes against humanity.

Cyril Ramaphosa in a press conference in London on September 25, 2017. (Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images)

Cyril Ramaphosa Isn’t South Africa’s Savior

The newly elected leader of the African National Congress is being treated like a messiah. But he might not even win the next election.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Donald Trump wait for a luncheon with African leaders on Sept. 20, 2017 in New York. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Diplomat’s Resignation Signals Wider Exodus From State Department

One diplomat’s stinging resignation letter offers a glimpse into declining morale at the State Department under Trump.

Former President Robert Mugabe during a speech on Nov. 8 in Harare, Zimbabwe. (Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images)

Mugabe Is a Goner, But His Looting Machine Is Here to Stay

Zimbabwe’s military didn’t topple the regime. It just restored the ruling party’s corrupt old guard to power.

Soldiers deployed to the streets of Zimbabwe's capital, Harare, on Nov. 15 as the military appeared to seize control. (AFP/Getty Images)

Zimbabwe’s Military Says There’s Nothing to See Here

Robert Mugabe is under house arrest, and the generals are in charge. But the top brass still insist there hasn’t been a coup.

Load 10 More Articles

You have read 0 of 5 free articles

Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover