Africa

A police officer removes tires set by protesters during a demonstration in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Jan. 14. (Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images)

Zimbabwe Crackdown Saps Hopes of Reform

The violence is a blow to Zimbabweans who hoped for greater freedom of expression in the post-Mugabe era.

A member of the medical staff of the Ebola Treatment Unit at the Bwera General Hospital in western Uganda on Dec. 12, 2018. (Isaac Kasmani/AFP/Getty Images)

Ebola Has Gotten So Bad, It’s Normal

Africa isn’t just dealing with an outbreak anymore—and that’s bad news for everyone.

Demonstrators during a march commemorating victims of Gambia's former regime, in Serekunda, on April 10, 2017.

Truth First, Reconciliation Later

After decades of dictatorship, Gambia has launched a truth commission. But in a country where some victims were also perpetrators, delivering justice to all won’t be easy.

President Omar al-Bashir appears at a rally with his supporters in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is the Uprising Sudan’s Genocidal Dictator Always Feared

The country’s current protests include all sections of society—and may soon topple Omar al-Bashir’s entire regime.

Opposition candidates Felix Tshisekedi (right), Martin Fayulu (second from right), and the head of the African Union Election Observation Mission, former interim Malian President Dioncounda Traoré (second from left), leave after a joint meeting on Jan. 2 in Kinshasa. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

African Leaders Must Act to Stop Electoral Fraud in Congo

South Africa and Angola have influence. They must use it to ensure that the Congolese government respects the will of voters.

(Musonda Kabwe for Foreign Policy)

Street Smart

Why South Africa’s formerly segregated townships are still central to its imagination.

Michée Yolona Selenga of the Independent National Electoral Commission tests an electronic voting machine during a voter information session in Mbenzale near Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 21. (Holly Pickett for Foreign Policy)

Congo Wanted an Election. This Isn’t What It Meant.

The country will vote for a new government, and then brace for a violent aftermath.

Zaida Catalán at work with U.N. colleague Michael Sharp. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Morseby)

U.N. Report Links Congolese Government to Murder of American and Swede

Suspect’s death in prison suggests authorities might be suppressing evidence.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed on October 30, 2018 in Berlin.

Abiy Ahmed Is Not a Populist

The Ethiopian prime minister’s opponents fear that he’s an African Erdogan. His rhetoric and policies suggest he’s more of a liberal democrat.

Zaida Catalán at work with U.N. colleague Michael Sharp. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Morseby)

Former Senior U.N. Official Defends Handling of Congo Murder Investigation

Responding to a Foreign Policy story, official says panel that probed the murder of two U.N. experts focused mainly on preventing future incidents.

South Sudanese anti-government forces display ammunition which they say was confiscated from government forces during fighting in September, in Panyume, South Sudan. (Sumy Sadurni/AFP/Getty Images)

How European and Chinese Arms Diverted to South Sudan Fueled Its Civil War

A new study, four years in the making, details the secret global supply chain sidestepping international arms embargoes on South Sudan.

Zaida Catalán and Michael Sharp were United Nations experts working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (Family photos/Foreign Policy illustration)

Congolese Cover-Up

The U.N. concluded two of its investigators, an American and a Swede, were killed in a random ambush in Congo. But evidence suggests they may have walked into a government trap.

Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to press at the State Department in Washington on Oct. 23. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Pompeo to Tap New Envoy for Troubled Central African Region

Pompeo has reversed his predecessor’s policy of eliminating special envoy posts.

Sudanese Foreign Minister Al-Dirdiri Mohamed Ahmed gives a press conference in Khartoum on June 24. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Administration Gives Sudan a Way to Come in From the Cold

The United States should stop listing Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism, Sudanese foreign minister tells FP, as Khartoum seeks to boost its crumbling economy.

Italy's populist Five Star Movement leader Luigi Di Maio (R) with party members Roberto Fico (L) and Alessandro Di Battista (C) after an election campaign meeting in Piazza del Popolo in Rome on March 2, 2018.

Italy’s Left-Wing Populists Won’t Stop the Far-Right. They’ll Strengthen It.

The Five Star Movement’s most prominent leftist, Alessandro Di Battista, is returning to politics, but don’t expect him to reverse the government’s anti-immigrant agenda.

Khoisan elders and activists prepare to honor the Khoisan activist Adam Mathysen at his grave on the outskirts of Johannesburg on April 27. (Nathan Siegel for Foreign Policy)

South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

As Pretoria prepares to confront the legacy of colonial and apartheid-era land theft, hardly anyone seems to care about the claims of the country’s earliest inhabitants—the Khoisan.

Three Congolese ride a motorbike and carry a cross for a grave in Mangina, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 23. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the First War Zone Ebola Crisis

The world thought it knew how to deal with Ebola outbreaks—but it’s never dealt with one like this before.

Ships in the Port Louis harbor in Mauritius on Dec. 25, 2015. (T. Vale/Getty Images)

African Governments Are Paying for the World Bank’s Mauritius Miracle

Ghost offices on the small island provide legal but questionable means of siphoning tax dollars away from poor countries and into the pockets of the global elite.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks in Beijing on May 14, 2017. (Damir Sagolj/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Reaches for Checkbook Diplomacy to Counter China

Washington ramps up development finance to offer countries an alternative to Beijing’s deep pockets.

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