Africa

Members of the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo stand guard after an alleged attack by the Allied Democratic Forces rebels in Beni on Nov. 11, 2018.

In Africa, All Jihad Is Local

The rush to link regional groups to the Islamic State could make militancy worse.

Gen. Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, the deputy head of Sudan’s military council, speaks at a news conference in Khartoum on April 30.

The Man Who Terrorized Darfur Is Leading Sudan’s Supposed Transition

The interim vice president, Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagolo, was in charge of the brutal janjaweed militias. Now he is calling the shots in Khartoum.

Jacob Zuma (right), the then-president of South Africa, and Ace Magashule, the then-premier of the Free State, ready to release white doves during the unveiling of the Nelson Mandela statue in Bloemfontein, South Africa, on Dec. 13, 2012.

The Man Who Stole South Africa

Cyril Ramaphosa has pledged a new dawn as president, but the secretary-general of his own party has built a web of corruption that thrives on darkness.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa (R) toasts with former President Jacob Zuma (C) and African National Congress (ANC) Secretary-General Ace Magashule (L) during the ANC's 107th anniversary celebrations in Durban on Jan. 12.

A Clean President Can’t Govern From Atop a Tainted Party

Voting for the ANC in the hope that its leader can clean house is a leap of faith. Those who looted South Africa’s government won’t give up so easily.

An ISIS billboard in the middle of the road on Nov. 8, 2016 in Qaraqosh, Iraq.

Welcome to the Post-Middle East ISIS

The Islamic State has a newly expanded geographic focus—and the results will be worse than the original.

Personnel in the South Sudan People's Defence Forces, formerly named the Sudan People's Liberation Army, take part in a drill at their barracks south of Juba, South Sudan, on April 26. (Alex McBride/AFP/Getty Images)

Former U.S. Diplomats Lobby to Stop South Sudan War Crimes Court

The move sparked anger among experts, who see the court as critical to peace.

Two paramilitary police officers secure an area along a street during the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 25.

FP’s Guide to China’s Belt and Road

The best pieces to read as leaders meet in Beijing.

A Libyan woman hits a photo of strongman Khalifa Haftar with her shoe during a demonstration in Tripoli on April 19.

Trump’s Support for Haftar Won’t Help Libya

The United States should be working to help negotiate peace rather than fanning the flames of another failed war. 

Former Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubeye Maiga (2L) is received in Mopti on his visit to Mali's central region on October 14, 2018. (Photo by Michele Cattani/ AFP/Getty Images)

Dumping One Government Won’t Fix Mali

March’s deadly massacre exposed the lack of progress since the country’s peace accords—and the many political and security reforms that are needed.

A miner stands on a mound of dirt at an abandoned industrial mine March 28, 2006 in Mongbwalu, Congo. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Your Cell Phone Is Spreading Ebola

A deadly outbreak in Congo has become a global emergency because of a raging conflict over valuable minerals.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

Sudanese demonstrators gather in central Khartoum after the toppling of President Omar al-Bashir on April 11. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

In Sudan, a Transition to Democracy or a Military Power Play?

Omar al-Bashir’s three-decade rule is over, but demonstrators reject the army’s plan.

Sudanese protesters wave a national flag atop a military vehicle next to soldiers near military headquarters in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 7. (AFP/Getty Images)

How Two U.S. Presidents Reshaped America’s Policy Toward Sudan

As thousands protest the Bashir regime, Washington has helped legitimize it.

A member of the Malian Army at the military base in Anderamboukane, Menaka region, on March 22. (Agnes Coudurier/AFP/Getty Images)

Radical Islamists Have Opened a New Front in Mali

Local grievances are behind the recent violence in the country. Jihadis are hoping to exploit them to build a caliphate.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed holds a press conference in Addis Ababa on Aug. 25, 2018. (Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images)

Abiy Ahmed Should Be a Natural Friend for the United States

Seeking the right partners is just as important as avoiding the wrong ones.

A staff member of Huawei uses her mobile phone at the Huawei Digital Transformation Showcase in Shenzhen, in China's Guangdong province, on March 6. (Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images)

For Africa, Chinese-Built Internet Is Better Than No Internet at All

The need for web access has driven African countries to Huawei despite U.S. concerns.

Ben Shephard and Fearne Cotton pose with people in Hoima, Uganda, on Nov. 29, 2009 . The British TV personalities were revisiting Africa to see how money they raised over Red Nose Day is being spent, as well as helping to hand out malaria nets. (Des Willie/Comic Relief via Getty Images)

Comic Relief’s Vision of Africa Isn’t Funny

The perennial British charity is sticking with poverty porn in its fundraising efforts.

Prime Minister of the Netherlands Mark Rutte and Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel at the EU-League of Arab States summit, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt on Feb. 24, 2019. (Laurie Dieffembacq/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Isn’t Realistic. It’s Weak.

The EU has committed to outsourcing its dirty work to authoritarians in the Middle East and Africa—and to confusing dependence for maturity.

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