Africa

How Africans Are Dealing With Everyday Corruption

When accessing basic services, more than 1 in 4 people are still being squeezed for bribes.

Sudanese protesters demand civilian rule in Omdurman on June 29.

From Camel Herder to Dictator

With the rise of Hemeti, Sudanese politics has been turned on its head.

Sudanese protesters sit on a bridge during a demonstration outside the army headquarters in the capital of Khartoum on April 19.

Seeking to Secure Power, Sudan’s Military Ruler Hires Lobbying Help

Top general brokers a multimillion-dollar deal with a Canadian firm and hosts a former U.S. congressman.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani gives a press conference in Tehran on June 12.

Iran Pushes Uranium Limit

Plus: North Korea and the U.S. talk about a third summit, political maneuvering heats up in Israel, and the other stories we’re following today.

An asylum-seeker from Mauritania looks through the bars of a fence at a U.S.-Mexico border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, on May 31.

Why Record Numbers of African Migrants Are Showing Up at the U.S.-Mexican Border

Europe’s failure to help refugees in Libya is driving them across the Atlantic.

A man reads the Reporter, an Ethiopian newspaper, depicting the portraits of Ambachew Mekonnen, the president of the country’s Ahmara region, and of Gen. Seare Mekonnen, the chief of staff of the Ethiopian National Defense Force, in Addis Ababa on June 24.

Ethiopia Is at a ‘Very Critical Juncture’

After high-level assassinations, the country may still be in danger, says Human Rights Watch expert Felix Horne.

A man carries South Sudan's national flag at Mangateen Internal Displaced persons (IDPs) center during the visit of South Sudan's vice president in Juba on Nov. 17, 2018.

The Old Guard Are Killing the World’s Youngest Country

South Sudan was born amid great hope but has since descended into war. It will take a new generation of leaders to make it a successful state.

Sudanese supporters of the ruling Transitional Military Council chant slogans and wave national flags during a rally in Khartoum on May 31.

Sudan Talks Resume, Hong Kong Protests Continue

Plus: Russia releases a journalist, Botswana decriminalizes gay sex, and the other stories we're following today.

A flag is waved over protests in Khartoum, Sudan, on May 3.

Accused of Inaction, Trump Team Set to Appoint Sudan Advisor

Former U.S. diplomat Donald Booth expected to address the bloody impasse between military and protesters as U.N. officials warn of spiraling violence.

Document of The Week: Sudan’s Paramilitaries Are Seizing Abandoned U.N. Outposts in Darfur

The United Nations halts withdrawal of peacekeepers amid fear that Sudan’s notorious Rapid Support Forces are filling the security vacuum.

A protester waves a Sudanese flag in Khartoum on May 17.

Washington Is Turning Its Back on Sudan

The United States should not abandon the Sudanese in their greatest hour of need.

A Sudanese protester walks past burning tires as military forces tried to disperse a sit-in outside army headquarters in Khartoum, Sudan, on June 3.

Arab States Foment Sudan Chaos While U.S. Stands By

American officials are unhappy over the role of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE but say their hands are tied.

Document of the Week: Nixon’s Little-Known Crusade Against Genocide in Burundi

A 1972 memo downplaying the slaughter of Hutus in Burundi stirred an angry scrawled response from the president.

Members of the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo stand guard after an alleged attack by the Allied Democratic Forces rebels in Beni on Nov. 11, 2018.

In Africa, All Jihad Is Local

The rush to link regional groups to the Islamic State could make militancy worse.

Gen. Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, the deputy head of Sudan’s military council, speaks at a news conference in Khartoum on April 30.

The Man Who Terrorized Darfur Is Leading Sudan’s Supposed Transition

The interim vice president, Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, was in charge of the brutal janjaweed militias. Now he is calling the shots in Khartoum.

Jacob Zuma (right), the then-president of South Africa, and Ace Magashule, the then-premier of the Free State, ready to release white doves during the unveiling of the Nelson Mandela statue in Bloemfontein, South Africa, on Dec. 13, 2012.

The Man Who Stole South Africa

Cyril Ramaphosa has pledged a new dawn as president, but the secretary-general of his own party has built a web of corruption that thrives on darkness.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa (R) toasts with former President Jacob Zuma (C) and African National Congress (ANC) Secretary-General Ace Magashule (L) during the ANC's 107th anniversary celebrations in Durban on Jan. 12.

A Clean President Can’t Govern From Atop a Tainted Party

Voting for the ANC in the hope that its leader can clean house is a leap of faith. Those who looted South Africa’s government won’t give up so easily.

An ISIS billboard in the middle of the road on Nov. 8, 2016 in Qaraqosh, Iraq.

Welcome to the Post-Middle East ISIS

The Islamic State has a newly expanded geographic focus—and the results will be worse than the original.

Personnel in the South Sudan People's Defence Forces, formerly named the Sudan People's Liberation Army, take part in a drill at their barracks south of Juba, South Sudan, on April 26. (Alex McBride/AFP/Getty Images)

Former U.S. Diplomats Lobby to Stop South Sudan War Crimes Court

The move sparked anger among experts, who see the court as critical to peace.

Two paramilitary police officers secure an area along a street during the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 25.

FP’s Guide to China’s Belt and Road

The best pieces to read as leaders meet in Beijing.

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