Africa

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed holds a press conference in Addis Ababa on Aug. 25, 2018. (Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images)

Abiy Ahmed Should Be a Natural Friend for Donald Trump

Seeking the right partners is just as important as avoiding the wrong ones.

A staff member of Huawei uses her mobile phone at the Huawei Digital Transformation Showcase in Shenzhen, in China's Guangdong province, on March 6. (Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images)

For Africa, Chinese-Built Internet Is Better Than No Internet at All

The need for web access has driven African countries to Huawei despite U.S. concerns.

Ben Shephard and Fearne Cotton pose with people in Hoima, Uganda, on Nov. 29, 2009 . The British TV personalities were revisiting Africa to see how money they raised over Red Nose Day is being spent, as well as helping to hand out malaria nets. (Des Willie/Comic Relief via Getty Images)

Comic Relief’s Vision of Africa Isn’t Funny

The perennial British charity is sticking with poverty porn in its fundraising efforts.

Prime Minister of the Netherlands Mark Rutte and Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel at the EU-League of Arab States summit, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt on Feb. 24, 2019. (Laurie Dieffembacq/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Isn’t Realistic. It’s Weak.

The EU has committed to outsourcing its dirty work to authoritarians in the Middle East and Africa—and to confusing dependence for maturity.

Children use a tire to cross a flooded street in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines on Sept. 16, 2018. (Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images)

There’s More Bad News Than You Think

A new study finds some of the world’s biggest humanitarian disasters go virtually uncovered.

Kenyan LGBT activists attend a court hearing in Nairobi on Feb. 20. (Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images)

LGBT Kenyans’ Patience Has Gone Unrewarded

The Kenyan High Court has delayed deciding on decriminalizing homosexuality.

Jaston Khosa, a Zambian in his late 90s and a veteran of Britain’s colonial military, on Nov. 27, 2018. Earlier that day, he spoke with Britain’s Prince Harry at a veterans meet-and-greet to coincide with Armistice Day commemorations, before returning to his home in a shantytown on the edge of the capital, Lusaka. (Jack Losh for Foreign Policy)

Britain’s Abandoned Black Soldiers

More than 600,000 Africans fought for Britain in World War II. Now they want a fair deal.

A Nigerian man walks on plastic waste in the Mosafejo area of Lagos on Feb. 12. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)

Growth Alone Won’t Help the Poor

Nigeria shows that economic growth combined with rising inequality won’t lift people out of poverty. The country’s next government should heed the lesson.

Pro-Biafra supporters shout slogans in Aba, southeastern Nigeria, during a protest calling for the release of a key activist on Nov. 18, 2015. (Pius Utomi Ekepi/AFP/Getty Images)

Slouching Toward Secession in Nigeria

Apathetic voters are planning to boycott this weekend’s election—and may inadvertently boost the country’s most fervent separatists.

The United Nations General Assembly Hall on May 12, 2006. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Haley Tried to Block Appointment of Chinese Diplomat to Key U.N. Post. He Got the Job Anyway.

As the United States pulls back from the world body, experts say it is ceding influence to China.

President Andry Rajoelina reviews the troops during his inauguration ceremony  Mahamasina Stadium in Antananarivo, Madagascar, on Jan. 19.

Labeling Elections ‘Good Enough’ Lets African Leaders Get Away With Fraud

Setting the bar too low for African democracies, as the international community did in Madagascar, encourages electoral manipulation and bad governance.

Nigerian President  Muhammadu Buhari (left) and Peoples Democratic Party presidential candidate Atiku Abubakar (right) shake hands during a meeting in Abuja on Feb. 13. (Sodiq Adelakun/AFP/Getty Images)

Nigeria’s Election Is Shattering Political Taboos

The issue of restructuring the country’s delicate federal system has long been off limits. Both candidates have now put it front and center, ensuring that reforms are on the way.

A woman carries a pot of water on her head in Rann in north-east of Nigeria close to the Cameroonian border on July 29, 2017.

Cameroon Used to Welcome Refugees. Now It Forcibly Expels Them.

Nigerians fleeing violence at home are being kicked out of northern Cameroon and being sent back to areas terrorized by Boko Haram.

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari arrives to speak at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum at the Plaza Hotel on Sept. 21, 2016 in New York City. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Nigeria’s President Isn’t a Democrat. He’s a Liar.

Twenty years after its return to democratic rule, Nigeria is on the verge of re-electing a dictator.

Supporters of Felix Tshisekedi, the newly elected president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, hold his portrait and cheer during his inauguration in Kinshasa on Jan. 24. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

How Washington Got on Board With Congo’s Rigged Election

The State Department endorsed Felix Tshisekedi’s unlikely presidency, taking some U.S. officials by surprise.

Soldiers carry the coffin of one of the victims during the funeral ceremony of the seven members of the security forces killed after their vehicle struck a roadside bomb in eastern Burkina Faso, on Aug. 31, 2018 in Ouagadougou. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

Terrorism Threatens a Former Oasis of Stability in West Africa

Burkina Faso managed to avoid the violence that plagued its neighbors, but a combination of poverty, unstable neighbors, and weak security forces has opened the door for extremists.

U.S. Consul General F. John Bray (third from right) takes part in the closing gong ceremony at the Nigeria Stock Exchange in Lagos on Jan. 29, 2018. (Sunday Alamba/AP)

American Markets Can Beat Chinese Money in Africa

For Prosper Africa to work, it needs to unleash the power of U.S. investors.

Demonstrators arrive to protest against a request to release former Ivory Coast's president Laurent Gbagbo in front of the Conseil National des Droits de l'Homme on Jan. 14, in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. (Sia Kambou/ AFP/Getty Images)

Peacebuilding’s Poster Child Is Losing Its Shine

Ivory Coast is often held up as a post-conflict success. That could all fall apart.

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