al Qaeda

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo walks toward a plane to depart Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on June 24.

U.S. Intelligence Undercuts Trump’s Case on Iran-al Qaeda Links

Despite claims by Pompeo, Tehran and al Qaeda have been at odds more often than they've been aligned since 9/11.

A screen grab from a propaganda video released April 29 purportedly shows Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi for the first time in five years at an undisclosed location.

‘Let’s Kill This Baby in the Crib’

That’s what the CIA said when it had Osama bin Laden in its sights after 9/11. Instead, America veered off into Iraq, and the result is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who appeared in a new video this week.

A discarded Islamic State flag lies torn on the ground in the village of Baghouz, Syria, on March 24. (Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS’s West African Offshoot Is Following al Qaeda’s Rules for Success

The amorphous Boko Haram splinter group is taking inspiration where it can get it and bringing disaster to the Lake Chad Basin in the process.

A man prays at the burial of a friend on January 16, 2018 in Nairobi, Kenya after al-Shabab militants stormed the Dusit hotel complex.

Al-Shabab Wants You To Know It’s Alive and Well

The brutal attack in Kenya is designed to show Washington and the world that the terrorist group is still a force to be reckoned with in East Africa.

U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan's Nangarhar Province on July 7. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Needs an Afghanistan Exit Strategy

Washington should hand over U.S. military and political roles to other countries, including China.

(Illustration by Matt Chase for Foreign Policy)

The Future of War Will Be ‘Liked’

In the social media age, what you share is deciding what happens on the battlefield.

Yemeni mourners bury the bodies of Houthis killed in a car bomb attack which targeted a Shiite Muslim mosque in Sanaa during a group funeral procession in the Yemeni capital on July 22, 2015.

America Is Not an Innocent Bystander in Yemen

Washington has left a vacuum in the Middle East, letting U.S. allies do as they please—no matter how high the body count.

Rescuers work among the rubble after the bombing U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya on Aug. 7, 1998. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Bombings the World Forgot 

On the podcast: Ambassador Prudence Bushnell survived the 1998 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. Now she tells her story.

(JM Lopez/AFP/Getty Images/iStockphoto/Foreign Policy illustration)

Time for Peace Talks With ISIS and Al Qaeda?

With options limited for fighting terrorists, negotiations may be the best remaining alternative.

What can we learn from Bin Laden's diary? (Getty Images)

Among the Memes and YouTube Videos, What Do the Bin Laden Files Hold?

The CIA recently released hundreds of thousands of files seized from Osama bin Laden’s compound. What can we learn from them?

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U.S. Bombs Falling in Record Numbers In Three Countries

Trump’s looser authorities for airstrikes have unleashed huge increases in ordnance in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria.

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Book Talk: The Exile: The Stunning Inside Story of Osama Bin Laden and Al Qaeda in Flight.

Al Qaeda’s leader was in hiding for over a decade. A new account tells us what he was doing.

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The Bookshelf: FP Staffers Review the New Releases

Just in time for the holiday break, FP returns to reviewing new and upcoming titles on all aspects of international affairs.

On this episode of The E.R., Max Boot joins us to discuss his new book "The Road Not Taken."

Can Trump End the Never-Ending War?

Sixteen years into the war in Afghanistan, the Trump administration is preparing to finally win or go home trying.

A general view taken on June 11, 2017 shows portraits of Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani on the back of vehicles and text reading in Arabic: "Tamim the glorious" in Doha after the diplomatic crisis surrounding Qatar and the other Gulf countries spilled from social media to more traditional forms of media -- all the way back to billboards.

The diplomatic crisis surrounding Qatar and other Gulf countries has remained a peaceful one for now, but open warfare has been declared in the media -- both traditional and social. / AFP PHOTO / KARIM JAAFAR        (Photo credit should read KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Qatar Doesn’t Need a Blockade. It Needs an Audit.

This is Doha's chance to curtail its financial support for Al Qaeda – as long as it keeps the receipts.

A general view taken on June 11, 2017 shows portraits of Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani on the back of vehicles and text reading in Arabic: "Tamim the glorious" in Doha after the diplomatic crisis surrounding Qatar and the other Gulf countries spilled from social media to more traditional forms of media -- all the way back to billboards.

The diplomatic crisis surrounding Qatar and other Gulf countries has remained a peaceful one for now, but open warfare has been declared in the media -- both traditional and social. / AFP PHOTO / KARIM JAAFAR        (Photo credit should read KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Qatar Doesn’t Need a Blockade. It Needs an Audit.

This is Doha's chance to curtail its financial support for al Qaeda – as long as it keeps the receipts.

Armed police officers walk past newly installed barriers on London Bridge in London on June 8, 2017 following the June 3 terror attack that targeted members of the public on London Bridge and Borough Market. / AFP PHOTO / Paul ELLIS        (Photo credit should read PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Britain Still Keep Calm and Carry On?

With a government in crisis facing an increasingly dangerous terrorist threat, new options are on the table that could erode society’s resistance to further attacks.

An undercover Iranian policeman (L) holds a weapon outside the Iranian parliament in the capital Tehran on June 7, 2017 during an attack on the complex. 
The Islamic State group claimed its first attacks in Iran as gunmen and suicide bombers killed at least five people in twin assaults on parliament and the tomb of the country's revolutionary founder in Tehran. / AFP PHOTO / FARS NEWS / Omid VAHABZADEH        (Photo credit should read OMID VAHABZADEH/AFP/Getty Images)

What the Islamic State Wants in Attacking Iran

With a spectacular and bloody assault in central Tehran, the Sunni jihadi group is fanning the flames of a sectarian war.

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One Yemeni Governor Wants Trump to Know: You’re Fighting al Qaeda All Wrong

It's local forces and economic assistance that will defeat jihadism, Maj. Gen. Ahmed Saeed bin Bourek says, not drone strikes.

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