Argentina

Chinese fishing boats set off after being moored for more than three months in Taizhou, China, due to the annual fishing ban on the East China Sea on Sept. 16, 2014.

China’s Monster Fishing Fleet

Though not alone in its destructive practices, Beijing’s rapacious fleet causes humanitarian disasters and has a unique military mission.

Argentinian soccer star Diego Armando Maradona talks to then-Cuban President Fidel Castro in October 2005.

Maradona, Soccer’s Brilliant, Troubled Superstar, Dead at 60

The Argentine legend is remembered both for his on-field prowess and his off-field political activism, especially in Latin America.

Argentina's President Mauricio Macri chats with U.S. President Donald Trump during a G20 Summit on June 29, 2019 in Osaka, Japan.

Trump’s Argentine Plan for Transition Sabotage

There’s a clear precedent for the president’s post-election scheming. It’s not a coup—but it’s bad enough.

A man walks by a sign opposing debt repayments to the IMF during the coronavirus lockdown in Buenos Aires on May 22.

How to Fix Argentina’s Recurrent Debt Crises

Why President Fernandez is hoping for Joe Biden to win the U.S. election.

Abandoned houses in Seoul

Our Top Weekend Reads

Skyrocketing housing prices threaten South Korea, the plight of LGBTQ people in Kashmir, and rapidly deteriorating economic conditions in Argentina. 

A volunteer church worker delivers a box with food supplies at the Villa 31 shantytown, amid the lockdown in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on July 25.

Argentina’s Economy Crumbles as Buenos Aires Lockdown Continues

The nation was already on the economic brink before COVID-19 hit.

People protest against corruption in Lima on January 3, 2019.

How to Tackle Coronavirus Corruption

Latin American governments have a chance to model a better version of the inspector general, with even greater autonomy, to address graft in the public health sector.

A protester holds a sign  during a protest against corruption and hunger amid the coronavirus pandemic outside the presidential palace in Panama City, on June 25.

Latin America’s Wave of Protests Was Historic—Then the Pandemic Arrived

The coronavirus and lockdowns have worsened the region’s economic divides—and set the stage for more political upheaval.

Posters against the International Monetary Fund in Buenos Aires

Argentina’s Friendships Could Jeopardize Its Debt Relief

Facing a coronavirus-aggravated economic downturn, Argentine President Alberto Fernández is walking a foreign-policy tightrope between Bolivia, Venezuela, and the United States.

Argentine President-elect Alberto Fernández

U.S.-Argentine Relations Can Survive Trump’s Tariff Threat

Since Alberto Fernández’s election, the U.S. president hadn’t antagonized the incoming leftist administration—until the announcement of new tariffs on steel and aluminum this week.

Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra (right) shakes hands with his Bolivian counterpart, Evo Morales, during their fifth joint staff meeting in Peru on June 25.

Latin America Is Too Polarized to Help Stabilize Bolivia

Riven by ideological divisions and facing a lack of adequate regional mechanisms, neighboring countries cannot even agree on whether Evo Morales’s ouster constitutes a coup.

Argentine President Mauricio Macri speaks during the second debate for presidential candidates in Buenos Aires on Oct. 20.

Mauricio Macri Was Bound for Disaster

Argentina’s president, who is widely expected to lose Sunday’s election, had no options to save the country’s economy that would have let him stay in power.

Women dressed like the former actress and first lady Eva Perón march to celebrate the anniversary of women’s suffrage and denounce the policies of Mauricio Macri’s government in Buenos Aires on Sept. 23.

Feminism Is Uniting Argentina’s Left and Right

Ahead of elections, politicians on both sides are acknowledging the need to empower women.

Activists with green handkerchiefs, which symbolizes the abortion rights movement, demonstrate to mark the revival of their campaign to legalize abortion, in front of the National Congress in Buenos Aires, on May 28.

Young Voters Care About Abortion Policy. Argentine Politicians Are Ignoring Them.

The youth vote is becoming increasingly important in Argentina, but the leading presidential candidates are deliberately avoiding the issue that matters most to them.

A woman walks past a currency exchange board in Buenos Aires on Aug. 12.

Argentina’s Stock Market Decline Is Among the World’s Worst Since 1950

Despite Monday’s drop, Argentine stocks have performed better than those in Pakistan and Oman this year.

Emergency personnel search for wounded people after a bomb exploded at the Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires on July 18, 1994.

Argentina, Iran, and the Enduring Mystery Surrounding the Death of a Special Prosecutor

On the podcast: Alberto Nisman accused Argentina’s president of covering up Iran’s role in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires. Then he was shot in the head.

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