Argument

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and China's President Xi Jinping attend a meeting in Shanghai on May 22, 2014.

Iran’s Pact With China Is Bad News for the West

Tehran’s new strategic partnership with Beijing will give the Chinese a strategic foothold and strengthen Iran’s economy and regional clout.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and Chinese President Xi Jinping review troops during a welcoming ceremony.

Trump Has Pushed Iran Into China’s Arms

Hard-liners in Tehran have called for closer ties to China for years. The U.S. withdrawal from the nuclear agreement gave them what they wanted.

Brent Scowcroft testifies during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology on Feb. 8, 2012.

Scowcroft Trusted America

Washington’s honest broker built a National Security Council that placed a lot of power in the hands of a trusted few—despite the chance that those hands might belong to someone like Trump.

Saudi-led coalition soldiers deploy to the outskirts of Aden, Yemen, on Aug. 3, 2015, during a military operation against Houthi rebels and their allies.

Give Up on Proxy Wars in the Middle East

The United States has the opportunity to reshape its alliances and bolster lasting stability in the region—but only by ending a failed approach.

Crowds gather for an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus, on Aug. 6.

Europe Must Stand Up for Belarus

The crisis has come at the worst possible time, but red lines must be set.

An undated photo taken in April 2018 shows J15 fighter jets on China’s sole operational aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, during a drill at sea.

Slaughter in the East China Sea

What happens if China fights the United States and Japan? A mutual disaster, wargame predicts.

Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the G20 Summit on September 4th, 2016, in Hangzhou, China.

India Doesn’t Want to Be a Pawn in a U.S.-China Great Game

Beijing’s belligerence is driving New Delhi closer toward Washington—but with strings attached.

A boy herds sheep in the Nineveh Plains of northern Iraq on Nov. 11, 2016.

Iraq’s Indigenous Peoples Can’t Face Another Conflict

Despite the Islamic State’s retreat, Assyrians fear for their security in the Nineveh Plains. They need stronger support from Washington and Baghdad.

Hassan Ayad sticks his hand through concrete blocks as he is congratulated by a friend on his recent engagement while the two Palestinian men stand on opposite sides of Israel's security wall in East Jerusalem on September 23, 2003.

Oslo Is Dead, the Two-State Solution Isn’t

A two-state solution remains the only politically viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—and, with the right Israeli and U.S. leaders, it can be achieved outside the Oslo framework.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping

Washington Needs a Better Plan for Competing With China

U.S. China policy is heavy on rhetoric and light on goals. Articulating a clear set of objectives—from trade to defense—will help policymakers focus their efforts.

A woman carries a small Russian flag with the lettering reading "Freedom for Sergei Furgal", during an unauthorised rally in support of Sergei Furgal in the Russian far eastern city of Khabarovsk on Aug. 1.

Normal Is Over for Russia’s Hinterland

The ongoing protests in Russia’s far east aren’t a one-off—they’re a preview of the future of the country’s periphery.

Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi visits Kirkuk to follow operations against the Islamic State on June 2.

Iraq’s New Prime Minister Wants to Control the Iran-Backed Militias. It Won’t Be Easy.

Mustafa al-Kadhimi is better placed than many of his predecessors to cement the Iraqi state’s authority, but independent armed groups are pushing back.

A man wearing a face mask walks along a street of Havana on July 29.

Coronavirus Victories May Not Be Enough for Cuba

Health care success could inspire economic change, but the future still looks bleak.

The Qatar flag seen at the Opening Ceremony of the 15th Asian Games at the Khalifa stadium in Doha on Dec. 1, 2006.

How Israel Emerged as an Unlikely Peacemaker in the Middle East

By playing a productive role mediating between Qatar and its foes, the country has carved out a position as the one actor that could ease regional tensions.

Indian schoolchildren prepare for their Central Board of Secondary Education senior school certificate examinations in New Delhi on March 1, 2012.

Modi’s Textbook Manipulations

Under cover of the pandemic, the administration has removed chapters on democracy, secularism, and citizenship from schoolbooks.

Russian President Vladimir Putin talks to his Kazakh counterpart Nursultan Nazarbayev in Baku, Azerbaijan in December 2003.

Putin Is Ruling Russia Like a Central Asian Dictator

The Kremlin didn’t invent term limit resets and constitutional referendums. The autocratic leaders of Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan blazed the trail.

A U.S. serviceman bids farewell to his friend prior to the departure of a detachment of U.S. military police by train from the Coleman Barracks in Mannheim, Germany to Bosnia via Hungary in 1995.

Auf Wiedersehen to a Mostly Successful, Sometimes Rocky Arranged Marriage

From economic woes to racial strife, America’s troop presence in Germany hasn’t always been easy. But it always made an impact.

A Kashmiri boy looks out from his damaged family house after cross border shelling.

Kashmiris Lament the Loss of Their Youth

While much of India opened up to the world after the country’s 1991 reforms, Kashmir instead became the world’s most militarized zone. A generation of young people have suffered.

A Lebanese couple inspect the damage to their house in an area overlooking the destroyed Beirut Port on Aug. 5, in the aftermath of a pair of massive explosions in the Lebanese capital.

The Beirut Blast Is Lebanon’s Chernobyl

Negligence and corruption have caused a devastating disaster.

Soviet Red Army soldiers march in downtown Kabul during a military parade in October 1986.

Russia Is Winning the Information War in Afghanistan

The country’s former occupier is using Kremlin-backed media to fuel anger toward the United States.

Police officers stand guard outside the headquarters of Russia's Federal Security Services (FSB) in central Moscow on July 7, 2020.

Putin’s Security Forces Are Increasingly Unsure About Putin

Anti-government protests are growing, and the Kremlin doesn’t have stormtroopers willing to mount a crackdown.

In this photo illustration, a mobile phone featuring the TikTok app is displayed next to the American flag.

Beijing’s Retaliation on TikTok Could Hurt U.S. Firms

A forced sale may create another hurdle for U.S. companies operating in China.

An Al-Jazeera channel's journalist stands inside the defendants cage with his colleagues during their trial for allegedly supporting the Muslim Brotherhood at Cairo's Tora prison on March 22, 2014.

Arab Dictators Are Learning to Love Collective Punishment

Middle Eastern regimes increasingly aren’t just targeting dissidents—they’re going after their entire families.

A health care worker gives a COVID-19 test to a medical staff near Halyk Arena in Almaty on July 5, as Kazakhstan imposed a second round of nationwide restrictions to counter a huge surge in coronavirus cases.

COVID-19 Heats Up the New Great Game in Central Asia

Washington has a golden opportunity to counter China’s gains.

A volunteer disinfects an area inside Santa Marta Favela in Brazil

Latin America Can’t Survive the Coronavirus Crisis Alone

Countries are too rich to access conventional aid, but they can’t cope by themselves.

A satellite image shows Gaza City and the Jabalia Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 10, 2018.

Israel Can’t Hide Evidence of Its Occupation Anymore

For more than 20 years, an obscure U.S. law concealed satellite imagery of Israel’s activities in the occupied territories. Because of an abrupt reversal, satellite technology can now be used to defend Palestinians’ human rights.

Coal heavers wear sandwich boards to protest against low wages in 1921.

When Everything Is a Crisis, Nothing Is

Invoking crisis is a favorite tactic of dictators—and widespread misuse of the word robs it of its power. 

Artists perform on stage at the end of the opening ceremony of the 36th Summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, held online due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in Hanoi on June 26.

Vietnam Steps Up to Take ASEAN Leadership Role

Hanoi’s strong position on China and COVID-19 success bolster its status.

A man leaves the Menoyia immigration detention center near the town of Kofinou in Cyprus on May 29.

The End of Immigration Detention Doesn’t Mean the End of Fortress Europe

The coronavirus pandemic temporarily ended the practice of detaining and deporting asylum-seekers in many countries, but harsher border controls could make reaching Europe and the United States harder than ever.

A branch of the German bank Commerzbank

Trans-Atlantic Ties Should Put Finance, Not Security, First

Biden will need a progressive Europe policy for a post-Trump age.

Protestor holds a Black Lives Matter sign in Italy

As Europe Reckons With Racism, Italy Still Won’t Confront Its Colonial Past

Italian forces used chemical weapons and committed war crimes in Africa—but the country’s sordid history is not taught in schools and is rarely discussed by politicians or intellectuals.

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