Argument

Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias (right) meets with Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar (left) in Athens, Greece, on Jan. 17, 2020, ahead of a peace conference in Berlin aimed at ending the civil war in Libya.

Russia’s Role in the Libyan Civil War Gives It Leverage Over Europe

Russia has played all sides in the conflict to get a seat at the negotiating table. Now it wants an end to sanctions.

Iraqi mourners gather at the Shaheed Mohammed Baqir al-Sadr Bridge in Basra, Iraq, on Jan. 7, 2019, as they welcome the body of Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the slain chief of Hashed al-Shaabi, an Iraqi paramilitary force with close ties to Iran.

Qassem Suleimani Wanted U.S. Troops Out of Iraq. If They Go, ISIS Will Be Back.

The slain Iranian general helped defeat the Islamic State in Iraq, but his death is likely to unleash the sort of sectarian strife that Sunni extremists thrive on.

Then-Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in 2010

Putin Is Planning a Partial Retirement

The Russian president may never leave the political stage—but he's now ready to take a step back.

Taiwanese navy personnel salute during a drill near the Suao naval harbor in Yilan, eastern Taiwan, on April 13, 2018.

Taiwan Needs More Than Election Victories to Fend Off China

The growing threat from the mainland can only be deterred by a public willing to make sacrifices.

Businesspeople and shoppers walk along Madison Avenue in New York City on Nov. 1, 2011.

The Left and Right Are Wrong About Inequality

The problem isn’t trade or corporations—it’s the monopolization by professional groups of high-profit services.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) with Britain's then-Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (R), France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L), Germany Foreign Minister Heiko Maas (2nd L) at the EU headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018.

Europe Is Running Out of Time to Save the Iran Deal

After initiating a dispute resolution process, European leaders have a limited window to provide Iran with meaningful economic relief and seek to reduce tensions between Tehran and Washington.

A BMW employee works at the new BMW car production plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, on June 6, 2019.

NAFTA’s Replacement Gives Labor Some Shelter From Globalization’s Storms

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement sets new standards for workers — but can’t stand alone.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Jean-Claude Juncker, then-president of the European Commission, in Brussels on Oct. 17, 2019.

Avoiding Autarky

For some nations, trade and cooperation are becoming less attractive. But the world needs more coordination, not less.

Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi stands before the UN International Court of Justice on Dec. 10, 2019, in the Hague.

Myanmar Has Blazed a Path to Democracy Without Rights

Aung San Suu Kyi’s persecution of the Rohingya paved the way for Modi.

Children learn how to use an insecticide-treated net to prevent malaria exposure in South Sudan on April 2, 2009.

How to Reverse the World’s Trust Deficit Disorder

Public-private partnerships can solve the planet’s most vexing problems—but they need to focus on systemic change rather than single issues to succeed.

Then-Omani leader Sultan Qaboos and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani review the honor guard during a welcome ceremony in Muscat, Oman, on March 12, 2014.

Why Oman Loves Iran

The special relationship between the two countries traces back to a personal debt incurred by Sultan Qaboos.

A picture taken during a press tour organized by the U.S.-led coalition shows U.S. soldiers clearing rubble at Ain al-Assad military airbase in Anbar province, Iraq, on Jan. 3.

The Iraqi Military Won’t Survive a Tug of War Between the United States and Iran

Sectarian tensions have already hobbled the force. The competition between Washington and Tehran could break it.

socialism-why-it-wont-work-allison-schraeger-daniel-brokstad-illustration-foreign-policy-article

Why Socialism Won’t Work

Capitalism is still the best way to handle risk and boost innovation and productivity.

Pro-nationalist university students shout during a protest against the U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen and his followers during a demonstration in Ankara on July 21, 2016.

Erdogan’s Purges Have Replaced One Islamic Sect With Another

Turkey expelled alleged sympathizers of Fethullah Gulen from government jobs after the 2016 coup attempt. Other Islamic sects, and one in particular—the Menzil—are now filling the vacuum.

Chloe Cushman illustration for Foreign Policy

How Climate Change Has Supercharged the Left

Global warming could launch socialists to unprecedented power—and expose their movement’s deepest contradictions.

Prisoners walk through an atrium at HMP Pentonville in London on May 19, 2003.

Radical Islamists Are Still a Threat Behind Bars

The rise of prison emirs and radicalization among incarcerated extremists means that governments must be as vigilant with prisoners as they are with fundamentalists on the street.

Daniel Brokstad illustration for Foreign Policy

The World After Capitalism

The future depends on a social democracy that doesn’t reshape capitalism but transcends it.

Supporters celebrate the victory of Tsai Ing-wen

Taiwan Deserves to Be a Normal Country

It’s time to stop playing games about the nation’s status.

Prince Harry chats with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Toronto Mayor John Tory

Canadians’ Royal Fever Doesn’t Run That Hot

Canada might welcome Prince Harry and Meghan—but the monarchy itself is looking shaky.

Relatives of victims of the Iranian Airbus shot down by a U.S. Navy cruiser in 1988 over Persian Gulf waters stand under a painting depicting the scene during a ceremony in the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 3, 2003.

The Secret History of How a Downed Airplane Rekindled U.S.-Iranian Ties

A previous disaster, and its aftermath, suggests now is the perfect time for Washington to start talks with Tehran.

An AfD election brochure in Russian and German

Immigrants Are Big Fans of Germany’s Anti-Immigrant Party

The fiercest devotees of the far-right AfD aren’t native Germans but migrants from Russia.

The overseas Chinese student Helen Zhou, from Chengdu, heads to choir practice on campus at Linfield Christian School in Temecula, California, on March 23, 2016.

China Is Winning the Race for Young Entrepreneurs

Trump’s restrictive immigration policies—along with generous incentives from Beijing—have pushed Chinese students in the United States to return to China.

Oman’s Sultan Qaboos bin Said sits during a meeting with the U.S. secretary of state at the Beit al-Baraka royal palace in Muscat, Oman, on Jan. 14, 2019.

Oman’s Renaissance—and What Will Follow

Thanks to Qaboos’s legacy, Oman is better placed than many of its neighbors to confront the challenges that will continue to bedevil the Middle East.

Mexico's Andrés Manuel López Obrado

Mexican Diplomacy Has Gone Feminist

Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s administration has boldly reoriented its foreign policy toward gender equality.

A woman walks past a mural depicting a koala and firefighters in Melbourne, Australia

Australians Are Ready to Break Out of the Cycle of Climate Change Denial

Catastrophic fires make it hard for media to stick to old narratives.

Bishop Sahak Masalyan (center), the chairman of the Religious Council of the Armenian Patriarchate in Istanbul, addresses the congregation at Surp Asdvadzadzin Patriarchal Church on Nov. 11, 2019.

Turkey Must Stop Meddling in Armenian Church Affairs

The Turkish government is imposing its political preferences when it comes to selecting the leaders of the country’s minority groups—and posing a threat to religious freedom.

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