Argument

A family watches Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's address to the nation on a television at their home in Amritsar on March 24.

Leaders Can’t Lift Lockdowns Without Public Trust

Germany's reopening is working because Angela Merkel treats citizens like adults; China's is succeeding because people see results. In India, there's no trust—and little evidence of progress.

Riot police in Hong Kong

China’s Crackdown in Hong Kong Won’t Spare Foreigners

Business as usual is over in the city, whether companies like it or not.

Protesters take part in a march on International Women's Day in Madrid on March 8.

Spain’s Right Wing Sees Coronavirus Crisis as Opportunity

Conservatives have framed women’s rights rallies in March as a source of contagion, threatening to undermine the surging feminist movement.

Dominic Cummings, a special advisor to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, looks on during Johnson's press conference about the ongoing situation with the coronavirus outbreak in London on March 17.

The Decline and Fall of British Lying

In Britain’s hierarchical culture, the crime for the upper classes isn’t telling lies—it’s getting caught.

A portrait of Charles-Alexandre de Calonne (1734-1802), French politician and economist.

Forget Hamilton. This Is Europe’s Calonne Moment.

The EU is still muddling through its post-pandemic recovery—and 18th-century history suggests that disaster could await.

South Korean warplanes at at U.S. Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek

Want to Fix the Deficit? Bring Home the Troops.

As U.S. federal spending surges amid the coronavirus pandemic, it’s time to trim the real fat.

Shipping containers at the Port of Los Angeles

All Roads to a Better Trade Deal Lead Through the WTO

In Washington, efforts to withdraw from the trade body are gaining momentum. That would be a big mistake.

Riot police stand guard during a protest against a planned national security law in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on May 27.

China’s Surging Nationalism Has Claimed Hong Kong

The new national security measures won’t be the end of Beijing’s belligerence.

A cotton grower looks on as she works in a cotton plantation.

It’s Not Time to End the Uzbek Cotton Boycott Yet

Companies should not buy Uzbekistan’s cotton until labor protections and responsible sourcing are guaranteed.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro

Brazil Is Suffering. Bolsonaro Isn’t.

The Brazilian president is proving that right-wing populism has ways of overcoming self-inflicted disasters.

A woman and child walk past riot police standing guard on a street in the Mongkok district of Hong Kong on May 27, as the city's legislature debates over a law that bans insulting China's national anthem.

In Hong Kong, Xi Plays a Dangerous Game of Chicken

With its new security law, China risks massive economic and political consequences. Xi’s lack of concern should worry democratic nations everywhere.

Milos Zeman and Xi Jinping

No, China Has Not Bought Central and Eastern Europe

While some Central and Eastern European governments have taken pro-Beijing positions, their considerations are far more domestic than international.

The flags of Nova Scotia and Canada fly at half-staff outside the Nova Scotia Royal Canadian Mounted Police headquarters in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, on April 19.

Canada’s Gun Laws Are Only as Good as Its Neighbor’s

The country’s worst mass shooting in decades shows that U.S.-sourced weapons still pose a problem, even if Trudeau tightens regulations.

France Hotel Homeless Coronavirus

Are Hotels the Solution to Homelessness?

A commonsense solution to the housing crisis has gained backers amid the pandemic—but can the political will remain?

Kenya Face Shields

If African Governments Won’t Act, the People Will

With frustration rising over haphazard responses to the coronavirus, community networks are filling the void across the continent.

Prisoners charged with belonging to the al Qaeda-affiliated MUJAO armed group are taken out of a jail at the gendarmerie in the northern Malian city of Gao while they wait to be transferred on a military flight to Bamako on Feb. 26, 2013.

Al Qaeda and ISIS Had a Truce in Africa—Until They Didn’t

The Sahel region was inching toward stability, but conflict between local jihadi groups is threatening to bring back chaos.

Prince William of Britain scans in a drawing of himself onto a screen so he can make a cartoon character of himself dressed in a traditional Japanese costume during his visit to Tsutaya bookshop in Tokyo on Feb. 28, 2015.

Japan Doesn’t Want to Become Another Casualty of English

English skills bring status, but the public remains stubbornly bad at learning.

An Indian soldier communicates with colleagues on a walkie talkie at Nathula Gate, leading to the Nathu La border crossing between India and China.

Why We Should Worry About China and India’s Border Skirmishes

Three decades ago, the two countries reached an understanding not to fight. But Beijing is now a much stronger power.

Economic stimulus checks are prepared for printing.

Why the White House Should Propose More Economic Stimulus

While a wait-and-see approach is usually wise, unusual times require unusual playbooks, writes a former Trump administration economic advisor.

The pro-democracy lawmaker Wu Chi-wai is removed by security during a scuffle with pro-Beijing lawmakers at the House Committee's election of vice chairpersons, presided by pro-Beijing lawmaker Starry Lee Wai-king at the Legislative Council  in Hong Kong on May 22.

Beijing Has Lit Hong Kong’s Funeral Pyre

Hong Kongers will fight the imposition of mainland security measures fiercely but alone.

A MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft is parked in an aircraft shelter at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada, on Nov. 17, 2015.

Trump Inherited the Drone War but Ditched Accountability

Only a single formal check remains on U.S. killings worldwide.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel poses with a toy wind wheel during the opening of the Arkona wind park in Sassnitz, northern Germany, on April 16, 2019.

Has the Coronavirus Disappeared Climate Politics?

Europe’s pandemic bailouts are trying to save the continent’s economy. Less clear is if they can save the planet.

Japanese diplomat Yukio Okamoto

Yukio Okamoto’s Death Is a Tragic Loss for U.S.-Japan Relations

The master Japanese diplomat helped keep a complicated alliance on the rails.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and Britain's Queen Elizabeth II listen as Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during a state banquet at Buckingham Palace in London on Oct. 20, 2015.

Britain’s Conservatives Sold Out to Beijing Too Cheaply

Years of obeisance to Beijing have done nothing for Britain.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left) greets Benny Gantz, the leader of Blue and White party, at a memorial ceremony for the late Israeli President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem on Sept. 19, 2019.

Israel’s Cease-Fire Government Should Promote Healing, Not Division

Netanyahu and Gantz could use their unity government to speed Israel’s economic recovery rather than entrenching political deadlock.

A statue of the ancient Greek goddess Athena is illuminated under a full moon in central Athens on July 27, 2018.

Strategists Have Forgotten the Power of Stories

The arts are invaluable to national security policymakers facing an ever-changing future.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Donald Trump, and Chinese President  Xi Jinping at the first session of the G-20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017.

In the Post-Pandemic Cold War, America Is Losing Europe

In the growing confrontation with China, Europe is starting to take sides—just not America’s.

Iraqi Prime Minister-designate Mustafa al-Kadhimi makes a speech before the Iraqi Parliament in Baghdad on May 6.

Iraq’s New Prime Minister Is Taking Things Slow

After nearly 20 years of political chaos in Baghdad, Mustafa al-Kadhimi is trying incremental reform.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen

Beijing Is Pushing the Taiwanese Toward Independence Hard and Fast

If Chinese leaders really want peaceful unification, they need a mutually respectful approach.

A health psychologist in Spain during the coronavirus pandemic

The Next Pandemic Crisis Is Mental Health

The psychological harm of lockdown hits people with existing conditions hardest.

Employees of the state guesthouse set up the flags of China and the United States for the arrival of U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice ahead of her meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in Beijing on June 29, 2008.

The 5 Ways U.S.-China Competition Is Hardening

The pandemic has accelerated preexisting tensions—and there’s no slowdown in sight.

Chinese President Xi Jinping

The Sane Way to Challenge Xi Jinping’s China

The new nationalism and repression is a real challenge, but the United States needs to be smart.

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