Asia

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Dec. 4, 2013.

How Democrats Can Get Tough on China—Without Imitating Trump

The current White House has legitimate concerns but counterproductive solutions.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives at the railway station in Vladivostok, Russia, on April 24.

Kim Jong Un Wants It All

Anna Fifield on how the North Korean leader uses class divisions to stay in power.

A general view shows Harcourt Road after it was cleared in Hong Kong early on June 22 after protests on June 21.

In Hong Kong, the Freedom to Publish Is Under Attack

If the extradition law is eventually forced through the Hong Kong legislature, censorship of books will become commonplace in what has long been a bastion of publishing freedom.

Students from Beijing University during a massive demonstration at Tiananmen Square on May 18, 1989, before they began a hunger strike as part of the pro-democracy protests against the Chinese government.

30 Years After Tiananmen: How the West Still Gets China Wrong

Washington once mistakenly thought the crackdown would be temporary. It was wrong then, just as it’s wrong about a new Cold War now.

A Chinese paramilitary officer stands near Tiananmen Square during the Communist Party’s 19th Congress in Beijing on Oct. 22, 2017.

China’s Complacent Generation

Thirty years after Tiananmen, the CCP has largely triumphed over history. But its failure to recognize that could spell trouble.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and Russian President Vladimir Putin walk past a portrait of founder of the Islamic Republic Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini as they arrive for a press conference after meeting in Tehran on Sept. 7, 2018.

Iran Is Scaring Off Its Friends, Too

Even Tehran’s sympathizers in Europe and Asia are leery of its latest shifts in policy.

A woman points to a screen with menu items in Corsican on a Facebook page on October 1, 2016.

Big Tech Is as Monolingual as Americans

The biggest barrier to policing social media is language.

Chinese students march with banners reading “Down with the traitors who buy Japanese goods” during demonstrations in Shanghai in 1919.

The Birth of Chinese Nationalism

Chinese students marched into Tiananmen Square 100 years ago in a movement that is still shaping attitudes in the country today.

Students salute their teacher after finishing rifle training at the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force High Technical School in Yokosuka on Sept. 17, 2014.

With Little Fanfare, Japan Just Changed the Way It Uses Its Military

In a first since 1945, the country is sending self-defense forces to a non-U.N. mission abroad.

An ISIS billboard in the middle of the road on Nov. 8, 2016 in Qaraqosh, Iraq.

Welcome to the Post-Middle East ISIS

The Islamic State has a newly expanded geographic focus—and the results will be worse than the original.

People play drums during a ceremony to celebrate the accession to the throne of the new emperor in Tokyo on May 1.

The Ancient Rites of the World’s First Postmodern Society

Why Japan clings so tightly to its traditions—including the monarchy.

A peatland forest burns to make way for a palm oil plantation on Nov. 1, 2015, on the outskirts of Palangkaraya, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Whoever Wins Indonesia’s Presidential Election, Indigenous People Will Lose

Millions of Indonesians lack basic protections. The presidential contenders don’t seem to care.

An Indonesian election commission worker arranges ballot boxes in preparation for the upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections in Surabaya on March 18. (Juni Kriswanto/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s at Stake in Indonesia’s Elections?

The world’s third-largest democracy goes to the polls.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) leaves after an inspection of a mock-up F35A fighter  during a review ceremony at the Japan Air Self-Defense Force's Hyakuri air base Ibaraki prefecture on Oct. 26, 2014.

The Japanese Air Force Needs an Upgrade

Faced with China’s increasing aggression, Japan must invest in fifth-generation fighter jets to deter Beijing’s expansion.

South Korean television shows footage of the public demolition of a North Korean cooling tower at the Yongbyon nuclear complex on June 27, 2008. (JUNG Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images)

The Push for a Trump-Kim Nuke Deal Is Far From Over

When it comes to an agreement between Washington and Pyongyang, doing it right beats doing it fast.

U.S. President Donald Trump departs his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi on Feb. 28. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Was Right to Walk Away

In resisting the temptation to make a bad deal, he avoided failure at the Hanoi summit.

Pakistani Wing Commander Bilal presents sweets to Indian Border Security Force Commandant Sudeep during a ceremony to celebrate Pakistan's Independence Day at the India-Pakistan Wagah border post on Aug. 14, 2018. (Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images)

New Delhi and Islamabad Don’t Want Fire and Fury

As hostilities between India and Pakistan escalate, leaders in both countries are very aware of the risks of a nuclear catastrophe.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe walk at the White House in Washington on June 7, 2018. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Hanoi Summit Has Tokyo Feeling Left Out

Japan worries its interests will be ignored in deal between U.S. and North Korea.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security Adviser John Bolton listen to President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, DC, on Oct. 11, 2018. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

The Real North Korea Summit Is Inside the Trump Administration

It’s clear by now what North Korea is willing to offer in nuclear negotiations. The question is what the United States makes of it.

Children use a tire to cross a flooded street in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines on Sept. 16, 2018. (Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images)

There’s More Bad News Than You Think

A new study finds some of the world’s biggest humanitarian disasters go virtually uncovered.

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