Asia

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

The Asia Group  chairman and CEO Kurt Campbell attends the China Development Forum in Beijing on March 23, 2019.

Biden Makes His First Bold Move on Asia

The appointment of Kurt Campbell as Biden’s right hand on Asia will supercharge the incoming administration’s policy to counter China.

A French Rafale fighter jet prepares to land on the aircraft carrier "Charles de Gaulle" during a joint Indo-French naval exercise off Goa, India, on May 9, 2019.

The Quad’s Malabar Exercises Point the Way to an Asian NATO

India, Japan, Australia, and the United States have a good model if they want to keep the peace without threatening China.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waits for the arrival of Nepalese Prime Minister K.P. Sharma Oli for a ceremonial reception at the Indian presidential house in New Delhi on April 7, 2018.

Why India Refused to Join the World’s Biggest Trading Bloc

New Delhi chose protectionism over the RCEP. History suggests it made the wrong call.

A worker presents a domestically developed chip at the stand of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. during the China International Semiconductor Expo in Shanghai on Oct. 14.

U.S. Plan to Save Semiconductors Misses the Mark, Defense Firms Say

Companies that make microelectronics for the Pentagon argue that the current bill could maintain U.S. defense dependency on China rather than fix it.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves at the crowd during celebrations of the country's 73rd Independence Day, at the Red Fort in New Delhi on Aug. 15, 2019.

Asian Nationalists Hold the Key to a More Effective U.S. China Strategy

Missing in the current U.S. debate on China is the question of Asian nationalism and how the United States could profitably align with it.

Indian Minister of External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne, and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo before their meeting in Tokyo on Oct. 6.

Team Biden Should Start With an Asia Pivot 2.0

U.S. policy to contain China will require a lot more continuity with Trump than Biden’s backers would like to admit.

Footage of a North Korean military parade seen on television.

North Korea’s Huge New Missile Sends a Message to Washington

In the military parade celebrating the 75th anniversary of the founding of the ruling communist party, Pyongyang showed its claws and sought to bolster domestic support for the regime.

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto welcomes Russian President Vladimir Putin

Our Top Weekend Reads

Finland’s president carves a diplomatic niche, the coronavirus pandemic sounds alarm bells about genetic engineering, and Donald Trump seeks to actualize his dictatorial dreams.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware on July 28.

Why We Joined Over 70 Former Republican National Security Officials to Support Biden

A Trump empowered with a second term would be a threat to the United States, especially in Asia.

Indian security forces stand guard at a roadblock.

Kashmir’s Year of Hopelessness

One year on from New Delhi’s decision to revoke Kashmir’s autonomous privileges, the region remains ignored and underinvested. It’s difficult to see what could change the status quo.

The flags of the United States and India adorn a conference table during a meeting between representatives of the two countries.

India and the United States Need Each Other Mostly Because of China

Just 50 years ago, Washington was trying to intimidate New Delhi so it could cozy up to Beijing. China’s rise has brought the world’s two largest democracies closer.

Reenactors dressed as Greek hoplites attack Persians during an event  to commemorate the 2,500-year anniversary of the Battle of Marathon in Marathon, Greece, on Sept. 10, 2011.

Oh God, Not the Peloponnesian War Again

Western strategists need to learn some new history. Here are eight suggestions from Asia.

U.S. President Donald Trump visits China.

U.S. Closes Chinese Consulate in Houston Amid Surge in Chinese Espionage Cases

It’s the latest escalation in an increasingly tense bilateral relationship.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo shakes hands with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during their meeting at the prime minister's residence in New Delhi, India, on June 26, 2019.

To Fight China, India Needs to Forget Russia

The best way for New Delhi to modernize its military and protect itself from Beijing’s aggression is to forget its old relationship with Moscow and build closer ties to Washington.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) welcomes Russian President Vladimir Putin prior to their meeting in New Delhi on Oct. 5, 2018. During the visit, India signed a $5 billion deal to buy Russian S-400 surface-to-air missile systems despite a U.S. law ordering sanctions on any country trading with Russia’s defense and intelligence sectors.

Why India and Russia Are Going to Stay Friends

Conventional wisdom holds that New Delhi will turn to Washington as it increases competition with Beijing. But Moscow’s importance cannot be ignored.

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