assad

Syrian police show seized drugs and Captagon pills in Damascus on Jan. 4, 2016.

The Islamic State Isn’t Behind Syria’s Amphetamine Trade

After a record seizure, Italian police blamed the terror group. It’s more likely the Syrian regime has a hand in production and trafficking.

Syrians displaced by pro-regime strikes, join a convoy driving toward the Deir al-Ballut checkpoint in Syria on April 11, 2020.

How to Aid Syria Without Aiding Assad

U.N. agencies have submitted themselves to government control and approval. Donors must demand higher humanitarian standards or send their money through other channels.

A portrait of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad hangs in old Damascus, Syria, on June 16, 2020.

Sanctions Against Syria Will Help, Not Harm, Civilians

The Caesar Act is an overdue effort to starve the Assad regime of the resources that fuel its atrocities.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma arrive at the Elysee palace on July 14, 2008 in Paris.

The War Has Arrived Inside the Assad Family


Syria’s dictator crushed an uprising—but the ground may be crumbling beneath his feet.

Displaced Syrian children stand by the Turkish border wall at an informal camp in Kafr Lusin village in Syria's northwestern province of Idlib on Feb. 21.

The U.N. Won’t Save Idlib. The EU and NATO Can.

It’s too late to defeat the Assad regime, but a humanitarian intervention by the EU and NATO could prevent countless deaths and another massive refugee crisis.

An aerial view taken on Feb. 6, 2020, shows smoke billowing from tires burnt by Syrians in an attempt to hinder air strikes.

Turkey’s Intervention in Syria Will Slow Assad, But It Won’t Stop Him

Ankara's latest move might slow the Syrian regime's Russian-backed onslaught on Idlib, but the tyrant will remain on the throne so long as the world turns a blind eye.

A Russian military police armored personnel carrier drives past an equestrian statue of Bassel al-Assad, the late brother of President Bashar al-Assad, in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli on Oct. 24.

Russia Is the Only Winner in Syria

With Washington’s policy in chaos and Erdogan moving into Putin’s orbit, Moscow has come out on top.

An election campaign poster for President Bashar al-Assad.

Assad Is Now Syria’s Best-Case Scenario

The ruthless Syrian dictator is guilty of countless war crimes—and regrettably represents his country’s least bad remaining option.

A Syrian woman walks with a boy past a banner showing Russian President Vladimir Putin shaking hands with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, after arriving in a convoy carrying displaced people into government-controlled territory at Abu al-Zuhur checkpoint in the western countryside of Idlib province, on June 1, 2018.

The United States Still Needs a Syria Strategy

Leaving the refugee crisis unresolved while legitimizing the brutal Assad regime will only do further harm to U.S. interests in the Middle East.

A refugee camp near Suruc in southern Turkey, across the border from Kobani in February 2016. Many Kurds fled Kobani and other areas of Syria in 2014 to escape the Islamic State. Now, with a new war launched by Turkey near their homes, people are fleeing again.

Turkey’s War in Syria Was Not Inevitable

U.S. strategy in Syria has long been plagued by short-term thinking, while Russia, Turkey, and Iran played a long game. Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds is just the latest chapter in Washington’s bungled approach to the region.

Russian soldiers line up in front of their commander at the Russian military base of Hmeimim near the city of Latakia on Sept. 26.

The Rise and Fall of a Russian Mercenary Army

After a deadly debacle in Syria, Vladimir Putin has put the Wagner Group in its place—but plenty of other private security firms remain, and they could pose a threat to security in Russia and beyond.

Syria refugees walk after they crossed the Evros river, the natural boundary with Turkey in northeastern Greece, in the village of Pythio, on April 28, 2018.

Europe’s Fear of Refugees Is the Only Thing That Can Save Syria

Bashar al-Assad is on the verge of victory after massacring his population with Russian help. But the EU’s fear of yet another refugee influx could spur action to stop the carnage.

Syrian children at a tent camp in Sanliurfa, Turkey, on Jan. 9, 2018.

Turkey Can’t Host Syrian Refugees Forever

Voters across the political spectrum have become hostile toward the millions of people who fled Bashar al-Assad’s regime. Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his opponents are now responding with tough talk on repatriation.

Syrians gather amidst destruction in Zardana, in the mostly rebel-held northern Syrian Idlib province, in the aftermath of air strikes in the area late on June 8, 2018.

The U.N. Helps Syria Bomb the Opposition

A United Nations program passes on rebel coordinates to Russia. Its bombs do the rest.

Syrian refugee Nidal Hussein Hussein, one of those suddenly deported from Turkey, rides in a bus transporting him through the Bab al-Hawa crossing between Turkey and Syria's northwestern Idlib province, as he re-enters Syria on July 24.

Turkey’s Deportation Policy Is Killing Syrian Refugees

Ankara once welcomed millions of Syrians as “guests.” Now, as anti-refugee sentiment rises, they are being sent back across the border, where they face danger and death.

Syrian youths walk past a billboard showing a picture of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad wearing sunglasses while dressed in a Field Marshal's camouflage fatigues, on display in the centre of the capital Damascus on July 9, 2018, with a caption below reading in Arabic: "If the country's dust speaks, it will say Bashar al-Assad."

Assad Hasn’t Won Anything

After years of bloody warfare, it’s time to recognize what the Syrian dictator rules over: a chronically violent and chaotic failed state.

A truck carrying Islamic State fighters who surrendered to Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), as they are transported out of  Baghouz in Syria's northern Deir Ezzor province on Feb. 20, 2019.

ISIS Has Not Been Defeated. It’s Alive and Well in Southern Syria.

While Washington celebrates victory, the Islamic State is regrouping, and the Assad regime is letting it happen.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Federica Mogherini, the European Union's foreign-policy chief, in Munich on Feb. 7, 2015. (Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Doesn’t Even Agree on Assad Anymore

The latest issue to divide the EU is whether to recognize the legitimacy of Syria’s dictator and help him rebuild his country.

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