Australia

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves to supporters during an election rally on April 16.

Indian Exit Polls Predict Modi Win

India’s Narendra Modi appears set for second term, Austria’s ruling coalition collapses ahead of the EU elections, and what to watch in the world this week.

People check their mobile phones next to Huawei advertising in Shanghai, China, on May 10.

Huawei Ban Takes Effect

The U.S. ban of Huawei escalates the trade war with China, government and opposition representatives for Venezuela return to the negotiating table, and U.S. lawmakers fear skewed intelligence on Iran.

Iranian demonstrators raise placards as they chant anti-US slogans during a rally in Tehran on May 10.

Iran’s Rhetoric Heats Up

Iran responds to U.S. military presence in the Gulf, China and the United States reach a deadlock in the trade war, and what to watch in the world this week.

People lay flowers and notes to pay tribute to those killed in a shooting the day before at Al Noor Mosque and Linwood Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 16. (Recep Sakar/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Christchurch Has Seen Trauma Before—Just Not Like This

The quiet New Zealand city has endured natural disaster. But until March 15, it had never faced an unnatural one.

Hakeem al-Araibi, a former Bahrain national team soccer player with refugee status in Australia, is escorted by immigration police to a court in Bangkok on Dec. 11, 2018.

FIFA Cares About Cash, Not Players

By allowing a refugee soccer player to remain stranded in Thailand, soccer’s governing body is scoring another own goal.

Members of the environmental group Greenpeace hold up a sign calling for Australia to allow refugee children to stay in the country in Sydney on February 14, 2016, after a hospital in Brisbane refused to send an asylum-seeker baby back to detention on Nauru.

Australia’s Draconian Refugee Policy Comes Home to Roost

The government has gone to great lengths to keep asylum-seekers from its shores. Now it might have to accept some of them after all.

A Japanese soldier walks past amphibious assault vehicles during an amphibious landing exercise at the beach of the navy training center in Zambales province, north of Manila, as a part of a joint military exercise with the United States and the Philippines on Oct. 6. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images)

The Quad Is Not Enough

Trump has revived a four-way security dialogue among the United States, India, Australia, and Japan, but if it's going to make China pay attention, it will need some new members.

Demonstrators march in Sydney during a protest to demand humane treatment of asylum-seekers and refugees on July 21. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s First Immigration Economy

Australia’s economy is addicted to immigration, requiring ever-increasing infusions of new people to stave off an inevitable collapse.

An image released November 13, 2017, shows detainees staging a protest inside the compound at the Manus Island detention center in Papua New Guinea.

There’s No Escape From Australia’s Refugee Gulag

One branch of Canberra's notorious offshore detention system has closed. But the men who were imprisoned there are now stranded on a remote Pacific island that doesn't want them.

With the U.S. bailing out, the remaining 11 countries forged ahead and signed a revised Pacific trade pact in Santiago, Chile, Mar. 8, 2018. (Claudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Wants Back in the TPP? Good Luck With That.

Asia is moving on without America when it comes to trade — and could be better off for it.

A sea turtle swims over bleached coral at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland, Australia, in February 2016. (The Ocean Agency/XL Catlin Seaview Survey/Richard Vevers)

The Guardians of the Great Barrier Reef

Australia’s scientists are working against time and climate change politics to save their beloved coral reef.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, U.S. President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during the South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Manila on Nov. 13. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Australia Is Worried About America’s Ability to Lead

The West needs a strong, committed, engaged White House to hedge against China’s inexorable rise.

Australian troops in New Guinea during WWII. (Wikimedia Commons)

Finally, the Australian military explained to the rest of us: It’s a sentimental outfit

It is not surprising that a style of warfare characterized by aggression, individual initiative, and a distinctly impertinent attitude towards authority was celebrated.

Members of a police SWAT team lineup outside the main Olympic Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest, during security drill rehearsals on July 23, 2008 in Beijing. The 2008 Olympics' security chief has said that Beijing can stage a fun Olympics as well as a safe one, in response to charges that a massive security clampdown was squeezing the joy out of the Games. More than 110,000 troops and police were engaged in security and were joined by hundreds of thousands of volunteers and that millions of Beijing residents had also been roped into the operation. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

Hostage Taking Is China’s Small-Claims Court

Everyone in China — including the police — treats kidnapping as just the price of doing business.

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Australian Brig. Ryan: Russ Glenn gets our mission command right — but we still have lots of work to do, especially in professional military education

Tom challenged me to reflect on Russ Glenn’s recent article in Parameters, about the theory and application of mission command in the Australian Army.

The national flags of Australia and China are displayed before a portrait of Mao Zedong facing Tiananmen Square, during a visit by Australia's Prime Minister Julia Gillard in Beijing on April 26, 2011. The trip is Gillard's first to China, Australia's top trading partner, and comes at a time when the communist country is waging its toughest crackdown on dissent in years. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

Is China Pulling the Strings Down Under?

Revelations about Chinese influence have rocked Australian media and politics. Should the U.S. have the same debate?

TO GO WITH US-shooting-guns-Australia,FOCUS by Martin Parry
(FILES) This file photo taken on September 8, 1996 shows Norm Legg, a project supervisor with a local security firm, holding up an armalite rifle which is similar to the one used in the Port Arthur massacre and which was handed in for scrap in Melbourne after Australia banned all automatic and semi-automatic rifles in the aftermath of the Port Arthur shooting. When Martin Bryant massacred 35 people with semi-automatic weapons at Port Arthur in 1996, then-Australian prime minister John Howard reacted swiftly by pushing for tough new national gun laws. Within a year gun licences had been tightened, a weapons buy-back was enacted and an amnesty launched for anyone holding illegal arms, moves that took more than 600,000 guns out of action.     AFP PHOTO / FILES /  William WEST        (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

To Fight Terror, Will Aussies Give Up Their Guns?

After recent attacks, the first national gun amnesty since 1996 encourages people to turn in unregistered weapons.

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Listen: Behind Closed Doors, Malcolm Turnbull Roasts Trump

The media ball was supposed to be off record, but audio of the joking prime minister leaked.

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