Australia

Peter Dutton speaks in Australia's parliament.

Will Australia’s New Defense Minister Play Bad Cop to China?

Peter Dutton stopped the refugee boats. His next job is stopping Beijing’s maritime militia.

Supporters of the Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters in Sydney.

Australia Is Under Pressure to Implement Magnitsky-Style Laws

Both Washington and the Australian public want more sanctions on China.

A still from Pacific Rim: The Black.

Small Stories in an Age of Giant Monsters

The new Netflix show “Pacific Rim: The Black” finally lives up to the franchise’s internationalist potential.

U.S. President Joe Biden talks to the leaders of India, Japan, and Australia at the Quad summit.

Quad Summit’s Vaccine Deal Is Biden’s Bold First Move in Asia

It’s a smart step to counter China, but the next ones won’t be as easy.

Chinese aircraft carrier Liaoning arrives in Hong Kong.

Friday’s Quad Summit Will Show if It’s Just a Talking Shop

The fledgling Indo-Pacific alliance needs a mission—and its only meaningful one is maritime security.

Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne, and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pose for photographs before a Quad Indo-Pacific meeting in Tokyo on Oct. 6, 2020.

Getting the Quad Right Is Biden’s Most Important Job

The Quadrilateral Security Dialogue is the best hope for standing up to China.

A message is seen on the Facebook mobile app in Melbourne on Feb. 18.

Why Facebook Is Right to Pull the Plug on Australia

This isn’t about regulating Big Tech. It’s about fleecing foreigners for news that Australians no longer want to pay for.

The Sydney Morning Herald Facebook page is seen blank on February 18, 2021 in Sydney, Australia.

Facebook vs. Australia: What Happens When Big Tech Comes for the News?

Lisa Davies, the editor of the Sydney Morning Herald, talks to Foreign Policy about Facebook’s decision to block news for its users in Australia.

A woman passes the Google booth at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai on Nov. 5, 2018.

Australia Is Ground Zero in the Global Battle Against Google

A proposed law would shake the global internet—and put the Biden team’s Silicon Valley friendships to the test.

Protesters prepare to burn an effigy of Chinese President Xi Jinping during an anti-China protest in Siliguri, India, on June 17, 2020.

Why Attempts to Build a New Anti-China Alliance Will Fail

The big strategic game in Asia isn’t military but economic.

Pro-China activists in Australia

Biden’s First Foreign-Policy Crisis Is Already Here

China’s threats against Australia cannot go unanswered by the United States.

Winemaker Adrian Brayne handles wine stock in the processing building at Obsession Wines on Nov. 24, 2020 in Tumbarumba, Australia.

The United States Needs More Wine to Stand Up to Chinese Bullying

Strategic economic reserves can allow Washington to bolster smaller countries like Australia.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) summit in Bangkok on Nov. 4, 2019.

Cutting Through the Hype on Asia’s New Trade Deal

The RCEP truly is a China-style trade agreement: platitudinous and ineffective.

A French Rafale fighter jet prepares to land on the aircraft carrier "Charles de Gaulle" during a joint Indo-French naval exercise off Goa, India, on May 9, 2019.

The Quad’s Malabar Exercises Point the Way to an Asian NATO

India, Japan, Australia, and the United States have a good model if they want to keep the peace without threatening China.

Indian Minister of External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne, and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo before their meeting in Tokyo on Oct. 6.

Team Biden Should Start With an Asia Pivot 2.0

U.S. policy to contain China will require a lot more continuity with Trump than Biden’s backers would like to admit.

Chinese Premier Lie Keqiang and Australian then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during a state visit in Sydney on Mar. 25, 2017.

China Learns the Hard Way That Money Can’t Buy You Love

Few countries have soured more rapidly against China than Australia, as decades of influence-building by Beijing come to naught.

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