Bahrain

A visitor touches an interactive display showing a projection of Aziz Kaddan, an Israeli Arab entrepreneur and the CEO of Myndlift, at the Peres Center for Peace and Innovation in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Sept. 3, 2019.

For Arab Israelis, the New Peace Treaties Spell Opportunity

The Abraham Accords are spurring Israel’s Arab entrepreneurs to bridge cultures.

An airplane from Israel's El Al airline arrives in Abu Dhabi

How Arab Ties With Israel Became the Middle East’s New Normal

Though Israel remains opposed to Palestinian independence, 2020 marked the year of its acceptance in the region.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, U.S. President Donald Trump, and UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan at the signing of the Abraham Accords at the White House in Washington, DC, on Sept. 15.

Trump’s Parting Gift to Biden: A More Stable Middle East

He was successful because only an iconoclastic president could have rejected false assumptions and failed strategies.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, U.S. President Donald Trump, and UAE Foreign Affairs Minister Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan at the Abraham Accords signing ceremony at the White House in Washington, DC, on Sept. 15.

UAE, Bahrain Brace for a Chillier Biden Approach

Biden will shift focus in the Middle East, but Israeli-Arab normalization will continue.

Palestinians gather to commemorate the Second Intifada and to protest the Israeli normalization deals in the occupied West Bank on Sept. 28.

What Normalization?

How Israel’s agreements this year with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates made the Middle East more volatile.

An airplane of Israel's El Al is adorned with the Emirati, Israeli, and U.S. flags and the word "peace" in Arabic, English, and Hebrew on arriving at the Abu Dhabi airport in the first-ever commercial flight from Israel to the UAE on Aug. 31, 2020.

Welcome to a Brand-New Middle East

Israel’s pacts with the UAE and Bahrain go far beyond the tenuous “cold peace” with Egypt and Jordan. They could even help end the conflict with the Palestinians.

Bahrain Foreign Affairs Minister Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, U.S. President Donald Trump, and United Arab Emirates Foreign Affairs Minister Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan at the signing ceremony of the Abraham Accords at the White House on Sept. 15.

For Netanyahu, Normalization Deals Are a Long-Awaited Vindication

But the White House ceremony is marred by events back in Israel, including his mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Saudi Minister of State Mohammed al-Shaikh arrives for the second day of a U.S.-sponsored Middle East economic conference in Bahrain on June 26.

Gulf-Israel Ties Might Not Survive Trump’s Peace Plan

A political program that does not envision statehood for the Palestinians could reverse the Gulf Arab states’ tentative warming toward Israel.

Palestinian demonstrators carry caricatures during a protest against the  U.S.-led peace plan in Ramallah on June 24.

Wedge Politics Won’t Bring Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Kushner’s plan aims to divide Palestinians from their leaders but fails to recognize that the people already resent their corrupt leadership—while failing to place any similar pressure on an Israeli prime minister under indictment.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (R) meets with White House Advisor Jared Kushner (L), on Aug. 24, 2017 in Ramallah.

Economic Band-Aids Won’t Bring Peace to the Middle East

European leaders should not lend support to a Trump administration plan that dangles economic carrots to Palestinians while entrenching the Israeli occupation.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt attend the opening session of a conference on the Middle East on Feb. 14, in Warsaw, Poland.

Don’t Dismiss the Bahrain Conference. It Can Help Palestinians.

Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt’s peace plan may not be the deal of the century, but there are interim steps that U.S. officials and Arab leaders could take to help stabilize the West Bank and Gaza.

Israeli Culture and Sport Minister Miri Regev (C), Mohamed Bin Thaaloob al-Derai, President of UAE Wrestling Judo, and Kickboxing Federation (L) and International Judo Federation President Marius Vizer (R) chat during the Abu Dhabi Grand Slam Judo tournament in the Emirati capital Abu Dhabi on October 27, 2018.

How the Gulf States Got in Bed With Israel and Forgot About the Palestinian Cause

Benjamin Netanyahu is building ties with anti-Iran Arab leaders from Riyadh to Doha and betting that a peace deal is no longer a necessary prerequisite for normalizing diplomatic ties.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meets with Sudanese counterpart Omar al-Bashir in Damascus on January 12, 2008.

Shame on the Arabs

Many Arab rulers have revealed their moral bankruptcy by rekindling ties with Syria and embracing a war criminal.

Hakeem al-Araibi, a former Bahrain national team soccer player with refugee status in Australia, is escorted by immigration police to a court in Bangkok on Dec. 11, 2018.

FIFA Cares About Cash, Not Players

By allowing a refugee soccer player to remain stranded in Thailand, soccer’s governing body is scoring another own goal.

Bahraini men hold up a national flag and a placard reading in Arabic "Jerusalem is the compass of the revolutionaries" during a demonstration in the village of Diraz on July 10, 2015. (Mohammed al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty Images)

From Bahrain to Jerusalem

A Bahraini delegation's trip to Israel is the latest sign of the Gulf monarchies' burgeoning alliance with the Jewish state.

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01:  A youth waves Egyptian flags from a lamp post in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo.  (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Egypt Cracks Down, Again

Rainbow flags, political challengers, and citizenship laws are all in Cairo’s crosshairs.

Boot1

My Summer Holiday to the Forever War

America's military is scattered around the world fighting a battle they can't afford to lose — and don't have the resources to win.

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