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A Rwandan soldier watches fishermen as they come back to the shore in Mocímboa da Praia, in the Cabo Delgado province, Mozambique, on Sept. 27, 2022.
A Rwandan soldier watches fishermen as they come back to the shore in Mocímboa da Praia, in the Cabo Delgado province, Mozambique, on Sept. 27, 2022.

How Rwanda Became Africa’s Policeman

From Benin to Mozambique, President Paul Kagame is flexing his small country’s military muscle—and transforming the continent’s security landscape.

Benin's President Patrice Talon at a press conference in Paris.
Benin's President Patrice Talon at a press conference in Paris.

Benin’s King of Cotton Makes Its Democracy a Sham

Talon’s procedural reforms have hollowed out fair elections and are a master class in entrenching autocracy.

Two French army armored personnel carriers patrol a rural area during the Bourgou IV operation in northern Burkina Faso on Nov. 14, 2019, as part of a joint effort with the multinational force of the G5 Sahel.
Two French army armored personnel carriers patrol a rural area during the Bourgou IV operation in northern Burkina Faso on Nov. 14, 2019, as part of a joint effort with the multinational force of the G5 Sahel.

West Africa Is Increasingly Vulnerable to Terrorist Groups

By working collectively and innovatively, the region can prevent the next security and humanitarian disaster.

Ghana - Fuveme - During the high tide the ocean level reaches the same level as the land causing regular floods in the village.

Nestled between the ocean and the Volta river estuary, the village of Fuvemeh has seen its territory reduced from several kilometers to few hundred meters. Nowadays, the villages sits on a narrow strip of land which separates the coastline from the adjacent lagoon. Haunted by coastal erosion, its 1,000 inhabitants have literally nowhere to move.
Ghana - Fuveme - During the high tide the ocean level reaches the same level as the land causing regular floods in the village. Nestled between the ocean and the Volta river estuary, the village of Fuvemeh has seen its territory reduced from several kilometers to few hundred meters. Nowadays, the villages sits on a narrow strip of land which separates the coastline from the adjacent lagoon. Haunted by coastal erosion, its 1,000 inhabitants have literally nowhere to move.

The Waves Will Take Us Away

Climate change is destroying thousands of miles of West Africa's coastline. It's only a matter of time before it knocks out the region's economy, too.

Ghana - Fuveme - A villager carries the roof of his house on his shoulder as the high tide has started and the waves are quickly entering the village and destroying houses on its way.

Nestled between the ocean and the Volta river estuary, the village of Fuvemeh has seen its territory reduced from several kilometers to few hundred meters. Nowadays, the villages sits on a narrow strip of land which separates the coastline from the adjacent lagoon. Haunted by coastal erosion, its 1,000 inhabitants have literally nowhere to move.
Ghana - Fuveme - A villager carries the roof of his house on his shoulder as the high tide has started and the waves are quickly entering the village and destroying houses on its way. Nestled between the ocean and the Volta river estuary, the village of Fuvemeh has seen its territory reduced from several kilometers to few hundred meters. Nowadays, the villages sits on a narrow strip of land which separates the coastline from the adjacent lagoon. Haunted by coastal erosion, its 1,000 inhabitants have literally nowhere to move.

West Africa Is Being Swallowed by the Sea

Encroaching waters off the coast of Togo, Ghana, Mauritania, and others are destroying homes, schools, fish, and a way of life.

Soldiers of the Chadian hold a Chadian national flag as they patrol in armoured vehicles on January 21, 2015, at the border between Nigeria and Cameroon, some 40 km from Maltam, as part of a military contingent against the armed Islamist group Boko Haram. Chad, seen as having the most capable military in the region, sent on January 17-18, 2015 a convoy of troops and 400 military vehicles into neighbouring Cameroon to battle Boko Haram. AFP PHOTO / ALI KAYA        (Photo credit should read ALI KAYA/AFP/Getty Images)
Soldiers of the Chadian hold a Chadian national flag as they patrol in armoured vehicles on January 21, 2015, at the border between Nigeria and Cameroon, some 40 km from Maltam, as part of a military contingent against the armed Islamist group Boko Haram. Chad, seen as having the most capable military in the region, sent on January 17-18, 2015 a convoy of troops and 400 military vehicles into neighbouring Cameroon to battle Boko Haram. AFP PHOTO / ALI KAYA (Photo credit should read ALI KAYA/AFP/Getty Images)

Nigeria Scores Rare Victory Against Boko Haram

A mass surrender in a strategic fishing village indicates Buhari’s counterterrorism might have hope afterall.

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