Bolivia

An Iraqi protester clad with the national flag takes part in anti-government demonstrations at Tahrir square in the capital Baghdad, on Dec. 30.

Governments Can Kill Protesters—but Not Protest

The people want more democracy, even if their leaders want less.

Supporters of China's Muslim Uighur minority and Turkish nationalists wave the flag of East Turkestan during an anti-China protest.

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The international community responds to the detention of Uighurs in Xinjiang, Pope Francis's visit to indigenous communities angers right-wing Bolivians, and Russian mercenaries are on the ground in Libya.

Protesters burn items in Hong Kong

Violence Is Sometimes the Answer

Protesters get slammed by critics whenever they use force. But for the state, it’s normalized.

Pope Francis receives a plant offered by an indigenous woman from the Amazon as he celebrates the closing mass of the Synod on the Amazon on October 27, 2019 at Saint Peter's Basilica in the Vatican.

Catholicism’s Civil War Spills Into Bolivia

The pope is reaching out to indigenous people, and the right aren’t happy.

U.S. Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee Nov. 20, 2019 in Washington.

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Impeachment drama on full display in Washington, fallout of the U.S. recognition of Israeli settlements, and the legacy of Bolivian President Evo Morales.

A supporter of former Bolivian President Evo Morales

Evo Morales’s Chaotic Departure Won’t Define His Legacy

History won’t remember him for the ongoing unrest, but for the enfranchisement of Bolivia’s indigenous population.

Bolivia's interim President Jeanine Áñez (center) speaks during a press conference at the presidential palace.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Uncertainty in Bolivia after the resignation of President Evo Morales, a resurgence of Iraqi nationalism challenges long-term U.S. interests, and the United States is using diplomacy to crack into Greenland.

Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra (right) shakes hands with his Bolivian counterpart, Evo Morales, during their fifth joint staff meeting in Peru on June 25.

Latin America Is Too Polarized to Help Stabilize Bolivia

Riven by ideological divisions and facing a lack of adequate regional mechanisms, neighboring countries cannot even agree on whether Evo Morales’s ouster constitutes a coup.

Workers fill sacks with lithium carbonate at the state-owned lithium extraction complex in the southern zone of the Uyuni Salt Flat, Bolivia.

Bolivia’s Lithium Isn’t The New Oil

A popular theory around Evo Morales’s removal is completely mistaken.

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales speaks during a press conference after being granted asylum in Mexico City on Nov. 13.

Who Wants to Be the Next Former President of Bolivia?

Evo Morales’s successor faces an unenviable set of challenges to stabilize the country.

Then-Bolivian President Evo Morales speaks at a press conference in La Paz, Bolivia, on Oct. 24.

Why Is Evo Morales Suddenly No Longer President of Bolivia?

The ousted leader is calling it a “coup,” but he entered dangerous legal territory in pushing for an unprecedented fourth term.

A demonstrator waves a Chilean flag at a barricade during a protest against the government's economic policies in Santiago on Oct. 29.

Latin America’s Protests Are Likely to Fail

The popular uprisings in Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, and Haiti have many different causes and one thing in common: If history is any indicator, the outlook for genuine, lasting change is grim.

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The Diplomatic Dust-Up Between France and Bolivia — Over a Video Game

Bolivia's not happy with its portrayal in a new action-packed video game.

Bolivian members of the transsexual, gay and lesbian community take part in a march during the International Day Against Homophobia in La Paz on May 17. 2013. AFP PHOTO/Aizar Raldes        (Photo credit should read AIZAR RALDES/AFP/Getty Images)

Transgender Bolivians Get an Unlikely Bit of Good News

Bolivia is on the verge of passing a law that will allow trans people to legally change their name and gender.

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Rock Bottom

Despite a sinking summit, 15,000 laborers continue to claw at the mines in a Bolivian mountain.

"No Evo" graffiti in El Alto, Bolivia on Feb. 21. (Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images)

The Limits of Evo Morales’s Identity Politics

Not all of Bolivia’s indigenous people are happy with the country’s first indigenous president.

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