books

Berta Caceres Protest 2018

In Honduras, a Journalist Explores an Activist’s Murder

A conversation with Nina Lakhani, author of “Who Killed Berta Cáceres? Dams, Death Squads, and an Indigenous Defender’s Battle for the Planet”

A police officer watches television monitors showing a fraction of London's CCTV camera network.

4 Reads on a Frighteningly Plausible Vision of the Future

“Burn-In” fascinated and scared me as a cop, spy, writer, and citizen.

India’s high commissioner in London, V.K. Krishna Menon, signs the oath of allegiance to the Indian Constitution at India House in London in front of paintings of Jawaharlal Nehru and Mohandas Gandhi on Jan. 26, 1950.

Dismantling the World’s Largest Democracy

A new book recounts the inspiring story of how India’s constitution introduced democracy to people who had never experienced it before. Those freedoms are now in jeopardy.

Thomas Piketty at the Paris School of Economics in May 2014. Christopher Morris/VII/Redux

The Tyranny of Property

Thomas Piketty’s new book argues that rising inequality is explained by politics, not economics, and offers some radical solutions.

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Books in Brief

FP staff review recent releases on Chinese industrial espionage, the dissent channel in American diplomacy, and British anti-colonialism.

Nick Timothy (L), waits at haulage and logistics company Davies Transport during British Prime Minister Theresa May's visit on May 12, 2017 in Darlington, United Kingdom.

Putting Lipstick on a Bigotry

Former British Prime Minister Theresa May’s top advisor wants to remake conservatism. Instead he’s written a rousing defense of Little England xenophobia.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Patriarch of Russia Kirill lay flowers at a monument in Moscow's Red Square on Nov. 4, 2018.

Selling Your Soul to the Kremlin

A new book chronicles the Faustian bargain that Russians—from holy men to human rights activists—have made with Vladimir Putin’s government.

Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed (R) and his wife, Zinash Tayachew, wave to the crowd from the balcony of the Grand Hotel in Oslo on Dec. 10, 2019

Will Abiy Ahmed’s Bet on Ethiopia’s Political Future Pay Off?

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning prime minister has disbanded Africa’s largest political party in an effort to reinvent the country’s politics—but some powerful players stand to lose, and they won’t go quietly.

A Turkish bombardment on Syria's northeastern town of Ras al-Ain.

Is the World Getting Safer?

New research debunks the theory that wars are becoming less deadly and less frequent.

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Books in Brief

Vaclav Smil’s encyclopedia on growth and new releases on economics in hard times and diplomacy in war zones.

The Austrian writer Peter Handke poses in Chaville, in the suburbs of Paris, on Oct. 10, after he was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in literature.

Why Trolling Can Win You a Nobel Prize for Literature

Peter Handke’s greatest aesthetic strength is his biggest intellectual weakness: the absence of all political and psychological depth.

The Hungarian-born author Arthur Koestler, best known for his novel "Darkness At Noon," at his home in Alpbach, Austria.

‘Darkness at Noon’ Revisited

A new translation of Arthur Koestler’s classic dystopian novel reveals what’s relevant to our age—and what isn’t.

Frames of Chinese President Xi Jinping, US President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin are display in a photo shop in Beijing on April 17, 2017.

Democracy Is Fighting for Its Life

Around the world, political freedom isn’t just slipping away—it’s getting dragged down by fervent enemies.

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Books in Brief

Reviews of the latest releases on mosquitoes, the Islamic State, and Kim Jong Un.

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Europe’s Ever Closer Confusion

A newly translated novel portrays the European Union’s search for meaning as a historical reckoning—and a comedy of manners.

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Who Will Win the Self-Driving Future?

China and the United States have drastically different visions for autonomous transportation.

Document of the Week: Facebook Disappoints Authorities—Again

The doctored Nancy Pelosi video hardly marks the first time the social media giant has faced backlash. Consider Germany in 2015.

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Books in Brief

Recent releases on Richard Holbrooke, America’s hidden empire, and the untold story of Chernobyl.

Odette Sansom served as a courier spy in Britain’s Special Operations Executive during World War II. (PA Images via Getty Images)

Writing Women at War

A slate of new releases reexamine gender in conflict.

Helen McKendry, eldest daughter of Jean McConville, holds a family photograph showing her mother Jean McConville (left) and some of Jean's children including Helen herself (second from right), at her home in Northern Ireland on May 3, 2014. (Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images)

Almost Five Decades on From a Notorious Murder, ‘The Past Doesn’t Stay Buried’

A Q&A with Patrick Radden Keefe, the author of "Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland."

American prisoners of war captured by North Korean forces await liberation at the 38th parallel on Oct. 5, 1950. (Soviet Photo Agency/Bettmann/Getty Images)

Brainwashed

A new book on interrogation during the Korean War sheds light on how the 20th century imagined prisoners of war.

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