Bosnia-Herzegovina

A plaque depicting Alfred Nobel at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony 2008 in Oslo City Hall on Dec. 10, 2008.

‘This Is a Stain on the Nobel Prize Organization’

A conversation with Riada Asimovic Akyol, a Bosnian writer based in Washington D.C., about new Nobel laureate Peter Handke, who receives the prize on Tuesday.

A migrant walks among tents at the Vucjak camp on the outskirts of Bihac in Bosnia and Herzegovinia on  Nov. 20.

Croatia Is Abusing Migrants While the EU Turns a Blind Eye

The evidence of Croatian police violence toward migrants is overwhelming, but Brussels continues to praise and fund Zagreb for patrolling the European Union’s longest external land border.

Bosnian women flee Jajce, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on Oct. 31, 1992.

For Bosnian Women, No Justice—and No Seats

In the Balkan wars, women were targets. In postwar governments, they’ve been pushed out of sight.

Supporters of Greece's far right Golden Dawn party protest against the construction of a mosque in central Athens on September 5, 2018.

The Balkan Wars Created a Generation of Christian Terrorists

War radicalized the far-right — and nobody stopped them at home.

On the First Person podcast: Stephen M. Walt talks with George Packer about Richard Holbrooke, America’s long-serving diplomat.

How Richard Holbrooke Represented America’s Best and Worst Impulses

On the podcast: George Packer, in conversation with Stephen M. Walt, on America’s long-serving diplomat.

Richard Holbrooke at the Joint Summit on Business and AIDS in China on March 18, 2005 in Beijing, China.

Once Upon a Time, Americans Believed in America

A new biography of Richard Holbrooke is a portrait of an era when the United States was at the center of the world—and assumed it should be.

A woman mourns over a relative's grave at the Srebrenica-Potocari Memorial and Cemetery on Nov. 22, 2017. (Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images)

The Butcher of Bosnia on Trial

On the podcast: A film on the war in Bosnia probes the psychology of genocide and justice.

Milorad Dodik, president of Bosnia and Herzegovina's Republika Srpska entity, addresses media after casting his vote, on September 25, 2016, at one of local voting stations in Western-Bosnian town of Laktasi.

Journalists Are Living in Fear in Republika Srpska

Bosnia has a thriving media sector, but those who refuse to become mouthpieces for the government increasingly find themselves in exile or under police protection.

Migrants camp on the road in the vicinity of the Maljevac border crossing with neighboring Croatia, near the northern Bosnian town of Velika Kladusa, on Oct. 24, 2018. (Elvis Barukcic/AFP/Getty Images)

In Bosnia, a Migrant Way Station Is Becoming a Winter Prison

For years, the country remained untouched by the global migrant crisis, but now, even in a place where many people were once refugees, tensions are on the rise.

People gather to celebrate the return of the formerly banned anti-government group the Oromo Liberation Front at Mesquel Square in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on Sept. 15, 2018.

Don’t Let Ethiopia Become the Next Yugoslavia

Federations of ethnonational states can become explosive during moments of political liberalization. Abiy Ahmed must tread carefully to avoid a Balkan nightmare.

Milorad Dodik delivers a speech in the northern Bosnian town of Doboj on Oct. 7. (Elvis Barukcic AFP/Getty Images)

One of Bosnia’s New Presidents May Want to Break the Country Apart

Dodik campaigned on independence for Republika Srpska. Will Putin help him get his way?

Bosnian Serb supporters of leftist parties hold up images of Russian President Vladimir Putin during a rally in support of the government in Banja Luka on May 14, 2016. (Elvis Barukcic/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Is Building a Bosnian Paramilitary Force

With elections approaching in October, Russia has ramped up its support for Bosnia's Serb separatists.

Bosnian lovers Admira Ismic (L) and Bosko Brckic, who were shot dead while trying to escape the besieged capital last week and whose bodies lay embraced in a riverfront no-man's land for 5 days, are pictured in a photograph taken on Sarajevo's Miljacka River just after their high school graduation in 1985 - PBEAHUNJDBR

In Bosnia, Forgetting Could Mean a Brighter Future

The debate over whether to build an official memorial to Sarajevo's Romeo and Juliet, murdered in 1993, exposes the pain and peril of dwelling on the past.

Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wave the Turkish national flag during a pre-election rally in Sarajevo, on May 20. (Oliver Bunic/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan Is Making the Ottoman Empire Great Again

Turkey is leveraging tradition to expand its power in Europe — but the history cuts both ways.

Syrians walk amid the rubble of destroyed buildings following reported air strikes by regime forces in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, on August 30, 2015. More than 240,000 people have been killed since Syria's conflict began in March 2011, and half of the country's population has been displaced by the war. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY / AFP / ABD DOUMANY        (Photo credit should read ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)

There Are No Real ‘Safe Zones’ and There Never Have Been

Recent history shows that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s plan to create “interim zones of stability” in Syria won’t actually help save civilian lives.

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Around the World in 40 Books

Headed to Rio, Paris, or Cape Town this summer? We asked distinguished writers and thinkers to pick their favorite books about 20 of the world’s great cities.

Ljubljana, SLOVENIA:  Andreja Bajuk, Slovenian Finance Minister, shows Euros just changed at a bank machine from Slovenian Tolars into Euros, in Ljubljana 01 January 2007. Slovenia became the 13th member of the eurozone adopting the Euro today, as a first former communist state which joined the European Union?s common currency.  AFP PHOTO/ Stringer    (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

Bosnian Man: I Will Kill Myself if Slovenia Does Not Pay Back Its Debt

Slovenia owes Bosnians a lot of money. But threatening suicide on the roof of a government building might not be what prompts it to pay up.

Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic appears in the courtroom for his appeals judgement at the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague, The Netherlands, on July 11 2013. AFP PHOTO/ POOL/MICHAEL KOOREN        (Photo credit should read )

Criminal in the Hague, but Not in Republika Srpska

The autonomous Serbian government in Bosnia is questioning the war crimes verdict against its former president.