Brazil

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is surrounded by supporters while visiting  Brasilia on Aug. 23, 2020.

Tackling Disinformation in Brazil

Journalist Patrícia Campos Mello has faced some of the worst disinformation campaigns in Brazil. Now she’s raising awareness to fight back.

People protest against corruption in Lima on January 3, 2019.

How to Tackle Coronavirus Corruption

Latin American governments have a chance to model a better version of the inspector general, with even greater autonomy, to address graft in the public health sector.

“Mom told me what happened, what a scare!” Fran, the digital influencer, says to her aunt over a video call. Her uncle and their family’s maid contracted COVID-19 from guests, who came over for a birthday celebration. The family “spared no expense” on medical care for the uncle, who survived after 12 days in an intensive care unit. The aunt is categorical: It wasn’t the guests who infected him; she blames the maid. “You know how it is in the favela, everyone crammed in,” she says. “She brought COVID to us.” The maid dies in a run-down public hospital and is replaced by another one right after. “New maid—I have to teach her everything. How annoying,” the aunt laments. “Hahaha, I know how it is. But thank God the worst is over now,” Fran says. “Life carries on.”

A New Comic Exposes Racism Amid the Pandemic in Brazil

“Confinada” critiques the disproportionate toll the coronavirus has taken on poor and Black Brazilians—on top of ongoing systemic inequality in the country.

A man paints a sign during a protest against the killing of Black people during police operations in favelas in Rio de Janeiro on May 31.

Brazil Halts Police Raids in Favelas

It is only temporary—and poorly enforced—but the move does represent a first step in overcoming decades of brutality.

A call center supervisor talks with a telemarketing co-worker in Rio de Janeiro on Feb. 5, 2013.

The Brutality of Brazil’s Pandemic Call Centers

Call centers are a mainstay of the Brazilian economy—and a growing menace to its workers.

Manifestantes carregam cruzes com os nomes das vítimas —que inclui João Pedro Mattos Pinto, 14, morto em casa pela polícia em Maio—nas ruas de São Gonçalo. Brasil, 5 de Junho.

A polícia violenta e racista do Brasil

Apesar de constituírem mais de metade da população, pessoas negras continuam lutando pelo seu direito de viver.

U.S. President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he arrives for an Independence Day event at the Mount Rushmore National Memorial in Keystone, South Dakota on July 3, 2020.

Trump’s Mount Rushmore Speech Is the Closest He’s Come to Fascism

The world just lost its leading historian of fascist ideology. The late historian Zeev Sternhell would have recognized the president’s lies as propaganda in the tradition of Mussolini.

Protesters hold crosses bearing the names of victims—including that of João Pedro, 14, who was killed at home by police in May—in the streets of São Gonçalo, Brazil, on June 5.

Brazil Must Address Its Own Racist Police Violence

Afro-Brazilians make up over half of the country’s population, but they are still fighting for their right to live.

President of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro reacts during the swearing in ceremony for newly appointed Minister of Communications Fábio Faria amidst the coronavirus pandemic at the Planalto Palace on June 17, 2020 in Brasilia.

Bolsonaro’s Failed Diplomacy Leaves Brazil Isolated as Pandemic Rages

Ideological fixations have been a diplomatic and a public health disaster.

A protester holds a sign  during a protest against corruption and hunger amid the coronavirus pandemic outside the presidential palace in Panama City, on June 25.

Latin America’s Wave of Protests Was Historic—Then the Pandemic Arrived

The coronavirus and lockdowns have worsened the region’s economic divides—and set the stage for more political upheaval.

A resident of the Aglomerado da Serra Favela, carries food supplies on June 4, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

For Brazil’s Poor, the Pandemic Is Far From Over

As coronavirus cases there exceed 1 million, the country’s poorest are struggling to access medical care.

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