Brazil

A Venezuelan family at the Simon Bolivar International Bridge in the Colombian border city of Cucuta on January 10. (Schneyder Mendoza/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s Why Colombia Opened Its Arms to Venezuelan Migrants—Until Now

For years, Colombians fleeing violence left for Venezuela. Now mass migration flows the other way.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban (left) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands after making a joint statement in Jerusalem on July 19, 2018. (Debbie Hill/AFP/Getty Images)

Nationalists of the World, Unite!

Yoram Hazony's work provides a global scaffolding for the new far-right.

President Jair Bolsonaro waves a Brazilian flag while addressing supporters during his inauguration ceremony in Brasilia on Jan. 1, 2019. (Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Love Affair With Diplomacy Is Dead

A leader in liberal internationalism is about to turn its back on the world.

A view of an 800-hectare solar farm in Pirapora, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, on Nov. 9, 2017. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil Was a Global Leader on Climate Change. Now It’s a Threat.

Jair Bolsonaro’s government could roll back decades of progress on clean energy and reducing deforestation.

Worshipers at an evangelical church in Brasília, Brazil, on Sept. 21, 2018, pray for the recovery of then-presidential contender Jair Bolsonaro after he was injured in a knife attack. (Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro’s Christian Coalition Remains Precarious

A loose alliance of Catholic and evangelical conservatives helped Brazil’s new president to power. But their continued support is far from certain.

Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Are Brazilians Ready for Bolsonaro?

On the podcast: The era of the strongman returns to Brazil.

Brazilian Judge Sergio Moro gestures as he leaves the house of Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro after a meeting, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on November 1, 2018. (MAURO PIMENTEL/AFP/Getty Images)

Judging Bolsonaro

Brazil’s judiciary will be a major check on the country’s far-right president-elect.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro walks with Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 7, 2015. (Andy Wong/Getty Images)

How to Respond to Chinese Investment in Latin America

The United States can compete without making things worse.

Jair Bolsonaro, the president-elect of Brazil, casts his vote in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28. (Ricardo Moraes-Pool/Getty Images)

Bolsonaro Can’t Destroy Brazilian Democracy

Brazil’s new president is a throwback to its authoritarian past—but the country is more resilient than it used to be.

A man reads newspaper headlines announcing Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in the Brazil’s presidential election in São Paulo on Oct. 29. (Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil’s Military Is Not the Problem

Democracy will depend on whether civilians can exploit rifts between Bolsonaro and his base while regaining voter trust.

A single tree stands in a deforested area of Pará on Oct. 14. (Raphael Alves/AFP/Getty Images)

To Gut the Amazon, Bolsonaro Needs Local Help

The Brazilian president-elect can’t pursue his environmental policies on his own. After this weekend’s state elections, he’ll have the backing he needs.

Jair Bolsonaro waves to the crowd during a military event in São Paulo on May 3. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The Military Is Back in Brazil

From security to economic policy, under Jair Bolsonaro, the armed forces will be a major player in politics.

Brazilian Workers’ Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad campaigns on Oct. 27 in São Paulo. (Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)

‘Brazil Needs Peace and Not Hate’

Ahead of a runoff presidential election, Workers’ Party candidate Fernando Haddad spoke with Foreign Policy about Brazil’s future.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 20. (Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

How Women Could Win It for Bolsonaro

Brazil’s far-right presidential front-runner made hateful comments a hallmark of his political life. That hasn’t held him back.

A supporter of Brazil's far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a rally in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 21. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone.

Brazil’s populist firebrand is relying on conservative values, fear of crime, anger about corruption, and rampant fake news to gain support from across the political spectrum.

Brazilian far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro talks to the press in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 25. (Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

Investors Love Bolsonaro. Can He Deliver?

Markets are soaring ahead of Brazil’s runoff election—on what may turn out to be mere wishful thinking.

Street protests have erupted in Brazil in opposition to far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, right, who is leading in polls over his opponent, Fernando Haddad, left. (Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images/Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images/Fernando Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

FP’s Guide to the Brazilian Election

Ten things to read or listen to before the vote.

Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Flirting With Fascism

On the podcast: How Brazilians grew tired of democracy and rallied around a strongman.

Far-right Brazilian presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro at a press conference in Rio de Janeiro on Oct 11. (Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images)

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.

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