Brexit

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pictured.

Parliament Is Skeptical About Boris’s Brexit Deal

Still, if the new agreement fails to gain approval, the public may not blame Johnson at the polls.

Motorists pass an anti-Brexit Irish Unity banner as they drive in Dundalk, Ireland on Oct. 16, 2019.

Will Brexit Stumble Over Northern Ireland Again?

The Democratic Unionist Party’s statement on the latest deal with the European Union.

Scottish National Party Member of Parliament Ian Blackford joins celebrations marking five years since Scotland's independence referendum.

Scotland Could Leave the United Kingdom Over Brexit—and Green Energy

The debate over how to best marshal the country's alternative energy sources may affect a new independence referendum.

A British flag flies in front of the Big Ben clock tower in London.

Brexit Means Britain Needs a Constitution

British citizens will no longer be covered by EU law, and courts won’t have the power to protect minorities from the will of the parliamentary majority. Only a codified constitution can ensure basic rights.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson following his keynote speech at the 2019 Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, on Oct. 2.

Johnson Shifts His Political Calculations on Brexit

The prime minister now expects there will be a delay, but he thinks voters will reward him at the polls for trying.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses conference in his keynote speech on September 24, 2019 in Brighton, England.

The Labour Party Can’t Govern Itself, Much Less Britain

If you thought the Tories were a mess, you should have seen Labour's annual conference.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives for a meeting with United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres at the U.N. General Assembly in New York on Sept. 24.

Now It’s Really ‘Do or Die’ for Boris Johnson

Following a high court ruling that his suspension of Parliament was unlawful, the lame-duck British prime minister will have to confront a hostile Commons.

The British Bill That Slows a Hasty Brexit

Parliament delivers a blow to Boris Johnson’s power grab.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves No. 10 Downing St. to address the Houses of Parliament in London on July 25.

Boris Johnson’s Make-Believe Brexit Negotiations

He hasn’t just been rejected by Parliament—the British prime minister doesn’t even have a full team talking to Brussels anymore.

Queen Elizabeth II attends a service for the Order of the British Empire at St Paul's Cathedral on March 7, 2012 in London, England.

Britain Can’t Afford the Queen’s Weakness Anymore

In times of crisis, political legitimacy inevitably depends on practical power.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson appears on television ahead of bilateral meetings at the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Aug. 25.

Shutting Down Parliament Is Worse Than a Coup. It’s a Mistake.

If Boris Johnson is hoping to pressure Europe to accept his preferred Brexit outcome, he has badly miscalculated.

Queen Elizabeth II welcomes the newly elected leader of the Conservative party, Boris Johnson on July 24, 2019 in London, England.

The Queen Can’t Do Anything About Brexit

The suspension of Parliament is outrageous—but it’s all Boris Johnson’s fault.

A demonstrator, wearing a mask depicting Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, protests outside the gates to Downing Street in central London on Aug. 28.

King Johnson vs. Parliament

By proroguing Parliament at a crucial moment, Britain’s prime minister is following in the footsteps of King Charles I. The result won’t be as bloody, but it will do violence to the country’s democratic institutions.

Then-London Mayor Boris Johnson holds a brick aloft as he addresses the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham, England, on Sept. 30, 2014.

Boris Throws a Brick Through Parliament’s Window

The prime minister’s statement about proroguing the United Kingdom’s legislative assembly.

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