Britain

A British flag flies in front of the Big Ben clock tower in London.

Brexit Means Britain Needs a Constitution

British citizens will no longer be covered by EU law, and courts won’t have the power to protect minorities from the will of the parliamentary majority. Only a codified constitution can ensure basic rights.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson following his keynote speech at the 2019 Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, on Oct. 2.

Johnson Shifts His Political Calculations on Brexit

The prime minister now expects there will be a delay, but he thinks voters will reward him at the polls for trying.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses conference in his keynote speech on September 24, 2019 in Brighton, England.

The Labour Party Can’t Govern Itself, Much Less Britain

If you thought the Tories were a mess, you should have seen Labour's annual conference.

HP-populism-Britain-France

The West Has a Resentment Epidemic

Across the West, the main trigger of populism has been the growing inequality—and hostility—between urban and rural regions.

Britain's opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home in north London on September 4, 2019.

Jeremy Corbyn Is a National Security Threat

The radical Labour leader is anti-Western, not pro-justice.

Britain's parliamentary mace is a powerful symbol of authority

The Weapon Britain’s Parliament Can’t Do Without

The mace is a symbol of royal power—and sometimes of lawmakers’ anger.

Election posters cover a mural of former President Robert Mugabe in Harare, Zimbabwe, on July 30, 2018.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Boris Johnson upends British politics, al Qaeda readies itself for the 18th anniversary of 9/11, and Mugabe is gone, but his legacy is still shaping Zimbabwe.

The British Bill That Slows a Hasty Brexit

Parliament delivers a blow to Boris Johnson’s power grab.

Protesters cover their right eyes as they gather in Hong Kong on Aug. 30.

Our Top Weekend Reads

Arrests in Hong Kong, a proroguing prime minister, and criticism of World Bank funding in Xinjiang.

Queen Elizabeth II attends a service for the Order of the British Empire at St Paul's Cathedral on March 7, 2012 in London, England.

Britain Can’t Afford the Queen’s Weakness Anymore

In times of crisis, political legitimacy inevitably depends on practical power.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson appears on television ahead of bilateral meetings at the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Aug. 25.

Shutting Down Parliament Is Worse Than a Coup. It’s a Mistake.

If Boris Johnson is hoping to pressure Europe to accept his preferred Brexit outcome, he has badly miscalculated.

Queen Elizabeth II welcomes the newly elected leader of the Conservative party, Boris Johnson on July 24, 2019 in London, England.

The Queen Can’t Do Anything About Brexit

The suspension of Parliament is outrageous—but it’s all Boris Johnson’s fault.

A demonstrator, wearing a mask depicting Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, protests outside the gates to Downing Street in central London on Aug. 28.

King Johnson vs. Parliament

By proroguing Parliament at a crucial moment, Britain’s prime minister is following in the footsteps of King Charles I. The result won’t be as bloody, but it will do violence to the country’s democratic institutions.

Then-London Mayor Boris Johnson holds a brick aloft as he addresses the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham, England, on Sept. 30, 2014.

Boris Throws a Brick Through Parliament’s Window

The prime minister’s statement about proroguing the United Kingdom’s legislative assembly.

A man walks past a mural marking unionist territory in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on May 4, 2016.

Northern Irish Politics Are Broken

The Good Friday Agreement is crumbling, and an Irish backstop may not be enough to save it.

Members of the anti-Brexit campaign group Border Communities Against Brexit, dressed up as British Army Soldiers and Customs officials, pose with a wall installed on a road crossing the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland, during a demonstration in Newry, Northern Ireland, on Jan. 26.

Brexiteers Bear All the Blame for the Irish Border Impasse

The European Union and Ireland are trying to preserve Northern Ireland’s fragile stability. The British government is playing with fire.

Paramedics remove an injured man suspected of being an undercover police officer and attacked during a protest at Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on Aug. 13.

Hong Kongers Can’t Always Tell Cops From Comrades

Police infiltration is an old tactic—and not just by autocrats.

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