Business

Turkish soldiers stand guard at the Silivri Prison and Courthouse complex in Silivri, Turkey, on Feb. 18, 2020. Turkish businessman Osman Kavala has been held in the prison since 2017.

Erdogan’s Power Plays Turn to Profit Margins

The Turkish president is willing to tank the economy if it means he can quash his ideological opponents.

Workers construct a double-decker suspension bridge across the Yangtze River in Wuhan, China on May 8, 2018.

The Shrinking Chinese State

A look at Beijing’s spending suggests that Western fears of its influence may be misdirected.

People visit the Nokia stand at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona on Feb. 26, 2019.

The West Needs Champions

With China strongly backing its big national firms, the West should consider doing the same.

Activist Irade Kashgary waves a flag of the Uighur region as she takes part in a protest outside of the Apple Store on K Street on July 30, 2020 in Washington.

Why Western Companies Should Leave China

Consumers will punish brands that rely on forced Uighur labor. While abandoning the Chinese market might hit profits, it will bolster reputations.

The Wave sculpture by Wren Miller commissioned to launch Brita’s sustainability campaign is on display in London on June 15, 2016.

How to Keep Activist CEOs Honest

New sustainable finance regulations in Europe will raise the bar for green investment.

Workers raise a giant Ericsson signboard on top of a building in Beijing on Nov. 25, 1997.

How China Took Western Tech Firms Hostage

And what the United States and Europe can do about it.

Workers walk by the perimeter fence of what is officially known as a vocational skills education center in Dabancheng in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018.

In Rare Unanimity, Biden Could Double Down on Trump’s Uighur Sanctions

A bipartisan crackdown on Chinese forced labor has put Western corporations on notice—and could pave the way for Washington to finally support the International Criminal Court.

Soldiers practice administering swab tests at a tennis center in Liverpool on Nov. 6.

National Business Corps to the Rescue

In the United Kingdom, an obscure partnership between business leaders and the military pulled the country back from the brink. The United States and other countries should replicate the model now.

Employees eat in a cafeteria during the coronavirus pandemic

South Korea’s Corporate Hierarchies Are Breaking Down

A new generation of familial leadership is relaxing business culture.

Posters at the European premiere of Disney's "Mulan"

Disney’s ‘Mulan’ Disaster Highlights Dangers of China Deals

The cost of doing business with Beijing has risen sharply and swiftly.

The logo of Chinese video app TikTok is seen on the side of the company's new office space at the C3 campus on August 11, 2020 in Culver City, California.

Chinese Acquisitions of Western Firms Threaten National Security

If the invisible hand won’t produce buyers at home, governments will need to step in.

Tel Aviv's city hall is lit up in the colors of the United Arab Emirates' national flag on Aug. 13.

How 9/11 and the Coronavirus Pushed the UAE and Israel Together

The backstory of the UAE’s deal with Israel is a 20-year tale of business, technological, and personal ties.

Demonstrators wear masks of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Benny Gantz as they protest against plans to annex parts of the West Bank, on June 23 in Tel Aviv.

Corporations Will Be Complicit if Israel Goes Through With Annexation

Annexation will raise their legal risk of being held accountable for human rights violations and war crimes.

Employees eating lunch at a Dongfeng Honda auto plant in Wuhan, China, shortly after returning to work, on March 23.

As Economies Reopen, It’s the Law of the Jungle for Workers

Governments and companies are returning to business at many different speeds. All worry that something might go wrong.

Riot police in Hong Kong

China’s Crackdown in Hong Kong Won’t Spare Foreigners

Business as usual is over in the city, whether companies like it or not.

A participant stands near a screen during the ethical hacking contest Insomni'hack in Geneva on March 21, 2014.

Want to Avoid the Next Pandemic? Hire a Devil’s Advocate.

Forcing governments and businesses to institutionalize doubt—by putting hackers and red teams on the payroll—would stop groupthink and could prevent catastrophes.

Employees of the Gabonese pharmaceutical factory Sogafam

The Remaking of Big Pharma in a Post-Pandemic World

COVID-19 has bucked conventional wisdom on how the industry must operate.

Li Shufu, the chairman of China's Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, poses for photographs in front of Volvo cars in Tiananmen Square during the opening session of the National People's Congress in Beijing on March 5, 2011.

China Is Bargain Hunting—and Western Security Is at Risk

Beijing could use the coronavirus-induced economic crisis to go on a buying spree. The U.S. and European governments must restrict the purchasing of distressed companies in sensitive sectors.

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