Chile

A volunteer records the people who voted at his table during constitutional assembly elections on May 16 in Santiago, Chile.

Chilean Voters Have Turned Their Backs on Traditional Coalitions. What’s Next?

In a blow to the groups that have governed since democratization, voters chose independent candidates and alternative coalitions to draft a new constitution.

A woman walks past electoral posters ahead of this weekend’s elections in Santiago, on May 12.

Chile’s New Founding Mothers

Chile prepares to elect constitutional authors with 50 percent being women, a global milestone.

Demonstrators hold a Chilean flag that reads 'Constituent Assembly to recover sovereignty' during the sixth day of protests on Oct. 23, 2019 in Santiago, Chile.

Meet the Candidates Who Might Write Chile’s New Constitution

Many Chileans are hopeful that the upcoming constitutional drafting process can address long-standing issues.

A photo from the film “The Mole Agent.”

Octogenarian Sherlock Holmes

Oscar-nominated “The Mole Agent” is a film noir take on life in a Chilean nursing home.

Wind turbines run by the Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) are seen along a ridge line in Guanacaste, Costa Rica on March 26, 2015.

A Green Recovery in Latin America

Stimulus cash in the region aims to create environmentally friendly jobs, but there is room for far more.

Women take part in a demonstration during the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women in Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 25, 2020.

Why Chile’s New Constitution Is a Feminist Victory

Activists built on years of organizing to achieve a groundbreaking gender-parity requirement in the upcoming drafting process.

A demonstrator supporting ousted President Martín Vizcarra holds a Peruvian flag during a protest against the government of then-interim President Manuel Merino in Lima on Nov. 14.

Peru Needs a New Constitution

The country went through three presidents in a week in November—and it might soon have another if it doesn’t pursue a constitutional referendum like neighboring Chile.

Residents of the Galápagos Islands hold a demonstration outside the court where the crew of a Chinese-flagged ship confiscated by the Ecuadorian Navy is attending a hearing, on Aug. 25, 2017.

China’s Hunger for Seafood Is Now Latin America’s Problem

Massively in debt to Beijing, countries in the region can’t stand up to China to protect their coasts.

People with Chilean flags take part in a rally ahead of Sunday's referendum, in Santiago, on Oct. 22. Chileans will be asked two questions: if they want a new constitution and who should draft it.

A Year After Protests Began, Chile’s Constitutional Referendum Goes Ahead

On Sunday, after months of protests, voters can choose to keep or begin a process of replacing the current constitution.

chile-FACHO-fascism-pinochet-MAURO-ANDRÉS-illustration-02

In Chile, One Word Defines the Political Revolution

The Chilean term “facho” evokes the image of Chile’s fascist past—but also of present-day tenacity that thumbs its nose at institutional power.

A Chilean demonstrator holds a Mapuche Indigenous flag

Toppling Statues Isn’t Enough in Latin America

Rethinking the past is a tough challenge when colonial structures run deep.

A protester holds a sign  during a protest against corruption and hunger amid the coronavirus pandemic outside the presidential palace in Panama City, on June 25.

Latin America’s Wave of Protests Was Historic—Then the Pandemic Arrived

The coronavirus and lockdowns have worsened the region’s economic divides—and set the stage for more political upheaval.

Cheerleaders perform at the opening game of the Korea Baseball Organization League at a crowdless ballpark in Incheon, South Korea, on May 5.

Tales From the Lockdown: How COVID-19 Has Changed Lives Around the World

In South Africa, people are brewing beer at home. Muslims in India are celebrating Ramadan alone. And city streets everywhere are vacant.

An Iraqi protester clad with the national flag takes part in anti-government demonstrations at Tahrir square in the capital Baghdad, on Dec. 30.

Governments Can Kill Protesters—but Not Protest

The people want more democracy, even if their leaders want less.

Protesters burn items in Hong Kong

Violence Is Sometimes the Answer

Protesters get slammed by critics whenever they use force. But for the state, it’s normalized.

Demonstrators take cover as clashing with riot police during a protest against President Sebastian Piñera on November 19, 2019 in Santiago, Chile. (Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images)

From Model to Muddle: Chile’s Sad Slide Into Upheaval

Chile’s government has sought for years to fix inequality problems that date to free market reforms under Pinochet. It just wasn’t nearly enough.

Demonstrators march through Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 12.

Chile’s Protesters Have Won a Path to a New Constitution

Here’s why they want to replace the dictatorship-era document.

Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra (right) shakes hands with his Bolivian counterpart, Evo Morales, during their fifth joint staff meeting in Peru on June 25.

Latin America Is Too Polarized to Help Stabilize Bolivia

Riven by ideological divisions and facing a lack of adequate regional mechanisms, neighboring countries cannot even agree on whether Evo Morales’s ouster constitutes a coup.

A demonstrator waves a Chilean flag at a barricade during a protest against the government's economic policies in Santiago on Oct. 29.

Latin America’s Protests Are Likely to Fail

The popular uprisings in Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, and Haiti have many different causes and one thing in common: If history is any indicator, the outlook for genuine, lasting change is grim.

Load 10 More Articles