Cold War

The Fialka encryption system, part of the collection at the KGB Espionage Museum in New York City.

The Soviets’ Unbreakable Code

The hidden history of the Fialka espionage machine.

A nurse prepares a measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in New York on April 5. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

How Russia Sows Confusion in the U.S. Vaccine Debate

Not content to cause political problems, Moscow’s trolls are also undermining public health.

Election billboards of Angela Merke and Gregor Gysi, top candidate of the Left Party, on Sept. 16, 2005 in Berlin. (Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany’s Cold War Enemies May Become Partners

In eastern Germany, center-right Christian Democrats are considering teaming up with far-left former Communists.

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) bids farewell to South Korean President Moon Jae-in (R) on Moon's departure from North Korea at Samjiyon airport on September 20, 2018 in Samjiyon, North Korea. (Photo by Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images)

South Korea Is an Ally, Not a Puppet

Washington's image of Seoul is stuck in the 1970s. It's time to move on.

2018-books-lead

The Books We Read in 2018

Some of Foreign Policy’s favorite reads of the year.

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former President Barack Obama, former first lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton listen during a state funeral for former U.S. President George H. W. Bush at the Washington National Cathedral on Dec. 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Alex Brandon/Getty Images)

The Death of Global Order Was Caused by Clinton, Bush, and Obama

America’s post-Cold War presidents could have taken a road that didn’t end at Donald Trump.

U.S. President George H.W. Bush in the White House on Sept. 27, 1991 (Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images)

 George H.W. Bush’s Misunderstood Presidency

The late 41st U.S. president’s prudence was once derided as the wimp factor, but it has aged well.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan shaking hands with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev at the Kremlin Place prior to their last summit meeting on June 1, 1988.

What Would Reagan Do on Iran?

If Washington wants to pressure Tehran, the White House should stop alienating allies, empowering hard-liners, and harming regular Iranians.

Joan Wong illustration for Foreign Policy; David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images/Dirck Halstead/Liaison via Getty Images/AFP/Getty Images/Corbis via Getty Images

Thank You, Jimmy Carter

Restoring the reputation of America’s most underrated foreign-policy president.

Photograph of Judith Shklar, March 1972. UAV 605.295.11, Box 3.  Harvard University Archives.

Who’s Afraid of Judith Shklar?

Meet the American philosopher who showed that Western politics could only move forward by first taking a step backward.

Russian Matryoshka dolls depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Donald Trump are on sale in the Ruslania book store in Helsinki on July 9. (Timo Jaakonaho/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump-Putin Summit’s Potential Nuclear Fallout

When the U.S. and Russian presidents meet in Helsinki, the biggest risk won't be on everyone's radar.

Foreign Policy illustration

What a Secret Cold War Game of Nuclear Hide-and-Seek Teaches Us About North Korean Verification

Making sure that Pyongyang actually destroys its nuclear weapons may be impossible.

Vladimir Putin talks to former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev before a press conference in Germany. (JOCHEN LUEBKE/AFP/Getty Images)

I Knew the Cold War. This Is No Cold War.

Everyone's favorite historical analogy makes for disastrous foreign policy today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin on a computer screen in an internet cafe in Moscow. (DENIS SINYAKOV/AFP/Getty Images)

I’m Sorry for Creating the ‘Gerasimov Doctrine’

I was the first to write about Russia’s infamous high-tech military strategy. One small problem: it doesn't exist.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at the United Nations on Dec. 15, 2017. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The State Department Needs Rehab

American diplomacy is losing its battle with the Trump administration — but it can still win the war.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks at the opening session of the 19th Communist Party Congress in Beijing on Oct. 18, 2017. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Globalization Has Created a Chinese Monster

Xi Jinping's dictatorship isn't what the end of history was supposed to look like.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with National Security Advisor Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster on February 20. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Grand Strategy Is Overrated

Why President Trump shouldn’t necessarily heed the long-term vision of his own National Security Strategy.

TOPSHOT - Visitor looks the names on the wall of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, May 28, 2017. 
Motorcyclists are in Washington for the traditional annual Rolling Thunder ahead of Memorial Day, May 29. / AFP PHOTO / Jose Luis Magana        (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Great Powers Are Defined by Their Great Wars

Even the most rational leaders are influenced by the power of collective memory.

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