Corruption

Supporters of opposition leader and newly elected Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan celebrate in the streets of Yerevan on May 8. (Karen Minasyan/AFP/Getty Images)

Armenia’s Post-Revolution Party Is Over

The country’s new government wants to root out corruption—but the ancien régime isn't giving up without a fight.

Bulgarians light candles during a vigil in memory of Bulgarian television journalist Viktoria Marinova in the city of Ruse on Oct. 8. (Photo by Dimitar Dilkoff /AFP/Getty Images)

When Killing the Messenger Becomes the Norm

More journalists are assassinated than die in war zones.

South African President  Cyril Ramaphosa addresses the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Sept. 25.

‘Where There Has Been Wrongdoing There Will Be Accountability’

South Africa’s president tells Foreign Policy about his plans to tackle corruption, redistribute land, and restore the country’s moral leadership.

Italys Interior Minister and deputy PM Matteo Salvini (R) and Italys Labor and Industry Minister and deputy PM Luigi Di Maio gesture during the swearing in ceremony of the new government led by Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte at Quirinale Palace in Rome on June 1, 2018. (ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Been 25 Years Since Anyone in Italy Trusted the Government

Italian populism is still fueled by corruption scandals that are over two decades old.

Somali soldiers patrol Sanguuni military base south of Mogadishu, Somalia, on June 13. (Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images)

Somalia Is a Country Without an Army

The United Nations and foreign powers claim they are dedicated to building up the Somali National Army. Instead, they have become complicit in its dysfunction.

Protesters hold a banner reading "Stand up for decent Slovakia" during a protest in Bratislava, Slovakia, on June 22, 2018, four months after the murder of journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiancee.

Press Freedom Is Still Under Attack in Slovakia

A journalist’s murder shocked the country in February, but it hasn’t led to a more independent media.

Corruption_0725_twitterHP

The One Thing Modern Voters Hate Most

Charges of corruption are toppling leaders at a growing clip. That's a good thing for global politics.

Flags with the logo and the World Cup 2018 mascot Zabivaka are seen in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow on June 30, 2018 during the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament. (Photo by Vasily MAXIMOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of the 2018 World Cup

War is politics by other means — and so is the World Cup.

Croatia and Real Madrid midfielder Luka Modric appears in court to testify in a corruption trial in Osijek, Croatia, on June 13, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Croatia’s Soccer Stars Should Be Heroes. Instead, They’re Hated.

A corruption scandal involving the country’s top club and the national team’s captain has enraged Croatian fans.

Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan plays soccer during an exhibition match at the Basaksehir stadium on July 26, 2014, in Istanbul. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Captain Erdogan Can’t Help the Turkish Soccer Team

With so much political, social, and financial capital invested in its national squad, why can’t Turkey qualify for a World Cup?

Brazilian congressman and presidential candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, waves to the crowd during a military event in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 3, 2018.

Latin America’s Center Cannot Hold If It Doesn’t Exist

Mainstream establishment parties across the continent have been replaced by populists offering easy and empty answers.

Catalan Socialist party candidate Miquel Iceta (L) and Spanish Socialist party leader Pedro Sánchez attend a campaign meeting in Barcelona on December 17, 2017.

Can Pedro Sánchez Put Spain Back Together Again?

The 2017 crisis in Catalonia tore the country apart. The new Spanish prime minister will need to fend off rivals and manage alliances to stay in power long enough to heal the wounds.

Indonesian officials boarded the luxury yacht 'Equanimity', reportedly worth some $250 million and owned by Jho Low, a former unofficial adviser to the Malaysian fund 1MDB, at Benoa Bay in Bali on February 28, 2018.
(RULLY PRASETYO/AFP/Getty Images)

Malaysia’s $6.5 Billion Scandal Almost Sank Its Democracy

The cover-up of the 1MDB affair was taking the country toward autocracy — until the people won the day.

Bharatiya Janata Party supporters take part in an campaign rally in Bangalore on May 3. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Democracy Is More Delicate Than It Seems

After scrambles, fights, and bribes in Karnataka, the stage is set for a tough 2019 vote.

election_lead_smooth

How to Steal an Election in Broad Daylight

Autocrats and counterfeit democrats have perfected the art of rigging polls to stay in power — without breaking any laws.

Former Malaysian prime minister and opposition candidate Mahathir Mohamad celebrates in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on May 10. (Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images)

Everyday Anger Brought Down Malaysia’s Government

Corruption and incompetence pushed Malaysians to end decades of one-party rule.

Supporters of former Malaysian prime minister and opposition candidate Mahathir Mohamad celebrate in Kuala Lumpur on May 10. (Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images)

Malaysia’s Elites Ride The People’s Tsunami

Amid a democratic triumph, the new boss is still literally the old boss.

Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gestures to supporters at the headquarters of the Metalworkers' Union on April 7, 2018 in the Sao Bernardo do Campo section of Sao Paulo, Brazil after a warrant for his arrest was issued. The  former president told the crowd "I will comply with their warrant."

Lula Lost, But Brazil’s Democracy Has Won

By going to jail, the former president signaled his respect for the rule of law.

Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomes Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev ahead of an informal Commonwealth of Independent States leaders summit at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on Dec. 26, 2017. (Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images)

Azerbaijan’s Election Is a Farce

The United States should be condemning Ilham Aliyev’s corrupt regime rather than condoning it.

An activist of the new centrist-liberal Momentum party over-pastes an anti-migration billboard on March 28 in Budapest, Hungary. (Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images)

Hungary’s Strongman Has a Weak Spot

Viktor Orban may have won, but a narrow loss in the countryside suggests that corruption could one day be his undoing.

Load 10 More Articles

Want unlimited access? Subscribe today.